BA (Hons) Philosophy, Religion and Ethics

Philosophy, Religion and Ethics at Winchester explores the grand narrative of the philosophical tradition, from the ancient to the modern world. Importantly, the degree also gives students the opportunity to put their philosophy to work in thinking about religion, belief, and the ideas that underpin our history as a species.
*subject to revalidation

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BA (Hons) Philosophy, Religion and Ethics at University of Winchester

UCAS code: V520

Entry requirements*

Typical offer:

2016 Entry: 260-300 points

2017 Entry: 104-120 points

*UCAS has changed the way they calculate the tariff for courses starting in September 2017. Find out more about the new tariff.

Degree duration:

3 years full-time; 6 years part-time

International Baccalaureate:

26 points

If English is not your first language:

Year 1/Level 4: IELTS 6.0 (including 6.0 in writing) or equivalent

Course Tuition Fees and Additional Costs

UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man

2016 Entry (Full-time) | £9,000 p/a
Part-Time £1,125 per 15 credit module. The number of credits available per module may vary.  Students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will not exceed the government permitted rate of £6,750.
Total Cost £27,000 (3 years)

International Students

2016 Entry (Full-time) | £11,300 p/a
Part-Time £1,410 per 15 credit module. The number of credits available per module may vary.  Students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year.
Total Cost £33,900

For further details, click here

Additional costs:

Optional Field Studies for students on the Philosophy, Religion and Ethics pathway, in Year 2 and/or Year 3. Costs are dependent on location and duration, based on previous trips the costs have been between £800-£1200.

Optional costs - students are recommended to buy textbooks for modules. The costs are £100-£200 per year.

To find out what general costs are included or excluded in the course fees, such as textbooks and travel expenses, please click here

Other Information

Study abroad (optional):

USA

Field trips:

Students may undertake field studies to explore the diversity of religions, cultures and traditions - previous trips have included India, Istanbul and Jerusalem.

Location: 

Taught elements of the course take place on the King Alfred Campus or at West Downs, Winchester

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Fact:

Students have the opportunity to work with a variety of organisations or charities through the What's Next? module, which aims to help students think about employability.

Fact:

The University hosts a regular seminar series covering themes within Philosophy, Religion and Ethics.

Student satisfaction

This is a new course and so there are currently no subject specific data on student satisfaction from graduates, nor any employability statistics. The data supplied has been drawn from wider subject areas. In addition, information on learning, teaching and assessment for parts of the course, which have not yet been taught, is estimated.

Pre-approved for a Masters:

University of Winchester students studying Bachelor Honours degrees are pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible students must apply by the end of March in their final year and meet the entry requirements of their chosen Masters degree.

**Subject to revalidation

'Revalidation' is the process by which the University refreshes its existing provision. Revalidation assesses the quality and standards of the programme to ensure it continues to provide a distinct, high quality academic experience for students, enabling them to acquire the necessary academic knowledge, understanding, general and subject-specific skills required to pursue a graduate level career.

Terms and Conditions 

For more information about the University of Winchester's terms and conditions click here

As a Department, we deal with big questions. We ask questions about the nature of human existence and the human community, questions about the development and global impact of belief. We're interested in addressing the parts of our contemporary world that one usually wouldn't think to question. We're concerned with the ideas that underpin our history as a species.

BA (Hons) in Philosophy, Religion and Ethics will give you a grounding in the over-arching narrative of the philosophical tradition. From ancient Greece to existentialism and atheism, from Kant to Derrida, you'll encounter the thinkers who have shaped the way we see and understand our world. Each year you'll be able to examine new writers and ideas, each year you'll explore great philosophical works and what they mean. 

Importantly, our degree also gives you the opportunity to put philosophy to work. You'll be setting philosophical ideas in conversation with religious traditions, with sacred texts, with ethical debates about right and wrong, life and death, faith and politics. You'll develop critical viewpoints on scholarship, and you'll grow as writers, as debaters, and as thinkers in your own right.

Study in Year 1 is foundational and provides the basis for specialised study in Years 2 and 3. In Year 1, students are oriented in the core subject areas of their degree. They undertake year-long modules in theological tradition and religious studies, designed to develop study skills and enhance students' confidence in critical writing and reading. These sit alongside thorough introductions to university-level philosophy and ethics. 

In Years 2 and 3, students are able to build a profile of options around their philosophical studies to reflect their own academic interests; these reflect the range of specialisms offered in the Department. Optional modules tend to encourage students to think about the way religious ideas and practices interact with the contemporary world.

Some of our students arrive with destinations in mind (teachers, journalists, social workers, academics) while others discover their vocation while they're here. Wherever you're heading, we want to help you get there. A degree that develops you as an independent mind, as a problem solver, as a reader and a critic of society - that is a thrilling and fruitful place to begin.

Year 1

  • Great Theological Minds
  • Perspectives on Living Religions
  • Classical to Early Modern Philosophy
  • Ethics and Religion
  • Politics and Philosophy

Year 2

  • What's Next?
  • Kant and the Copernican Revolution
  • Atheism and its Critics

Optional modules:

  • Bioethics and Theology
  • Gender, Sexuality and the Bible
  • Hinduism and Modernity
  • Aspects of Islam
  • Religion and Peacebuilding
  • Science and Theology
  • Constructing Meanings: Bible as Literature
  • Religion in Contemporary Britain
  • The Many Faces of Jesus
  • Independent Study Module
  • Field Studies or Advanced Field Studies
  • Religion, Ethics and War
  • The Bible and Contemporary Culture
  • Buddhism: Traditions and Transformations
  • Judaism in the Contemporary World
  • Contemporary Christian Theology
  • Ancient Languages
  • Religion, Ritual and Society
  • Indigenous Religions
  • Church and Politics
  • Christians, Jews and the Holocaust
  • Christianity and Neoplatonism
  • Early Christian Mysticism
  • Orthodox Christianity
  • Seven Ecumenical Councils
  • Perspectives on Walter Benjamin
  • Hegel, Marx and Dialectical Thought
  • New and Alternative Religions

Year 3

  • Dissertation
  • Senior Seminar
  • Phenomenology, Existentialism and Identity
  • Contemporary Philosophy

Optional modules:

  • Bioethics and Theology
  • Gender, Sexuality and the Bible
  • Hinduism and Modernity
  • Aspects of Islam
  • Religion and Peacebuilding
  • Science and Theology
  • Constructing Meanings: Bible as Literature
  • Religion in Contemporary Britain
  • The Many Faces of Jesus
  • Field Studies or Advanced Field Studies
  • Religion, Ethics and War
  • The Bible and Contemporary Culture
  • Buddhism: Traditions and Tansformations
  • Judaism in the Contemporary World
  • Contemporary Christian Theology
  • Ancient Languages
  • Religion, Ritual and Society
  • Indigenous Religions
  • Church and Politics
  • Christians, Jews and the Holocaust
  • Christianity and Neoplatonism
  • Early Christian Mysticism
  • Orthodox Christianity
  • Seven Ecumenical Councils
  • New and Alternative Religions

For further information about modules, please view the course leaflet (see right hand side).

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions

The University aims to develop students as 'confident learners' by enabling them to acquire the knowledge and  skills to excel in their studies here and be transferable to further studies or the employment market. Staff and students form a community of learners who, together and independently, seek to generate and exchange knowledge. Over the duration of the course, students develop independent and critical learning, building confidence and expertise progressively through independent and collaborative research, problem solving, and analysis with the support of staff. Students take responsibility for their own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of learning resources available to them.

Teaching in Philosophy, Religion and Ethics is highly student centred and interactive. Through the course, we will help and encourage you to develop skills of independent learning and research, critical judgment and confident communication of your ideas and conclusions to others. Classes are relatively small and you will work with fellow students on group presentations, projects and website designs. These types of assessment are used alongside the more traditional essay, commentary and exams.

Programme Leader

Teaching team

Our undergraduate degrees are taught by highly qualified and creative staff, each of whom is internationally recognised in their chosen field. They include:

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures library 

The course employs a lot of 'formative' work through our lecture time to actively prepare students for formal, 'summative' assessments. We tend not to use old-style exams very often.

The University is committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to students on their academic progress and achievement, enabling them to reflect on their progress and plan their academic and skills development effectively. Students are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from their course tutors and lecturers.

At the University of Winchester validated programmes may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances. The University is committed to ensuring that all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used in the programme you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day/Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Graduates enter a wide range of careers in such areas as teaching (philosophy, religion or ethics), charity/Non-Governmental Organisation work, and employment in both the public and private sectors.

For more information about graduate employment visit Freshers to Future - what will yours be?

Employability

The Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) record collects information about what those completing university go on to do six months after graduation. The Careers Service undertakes DLHE on an annual basis through surveys and a data collection process. DLHE is designed and strictly controlled by HESA.

While DLHE provides accurate information about first destinations, the data need to be viewed with some degree of care. Six months after leaving university is often a time of much uncertainty and change for leavers; many will be unsure of their long-term career plans and may take a temporary job or time out. The destinations of graduates only six months out of university do not necessarily reflect longer term career success and are therefore a crude measure of employability. Therefore, DLHE data should be viewed as merely a 'snapshot' of one particular year's experiences at a specific point in time.

At the University of Winchester, we are committed to ensuring all our students gain employability skills to enable you to enter graduate level jobs and pursue the profession of your choice, for more information please read the Employability Statement.

Course Enquiries and Applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234
UK and EU Students:Send us a message

International Students

International students seeking additional information about this programme can send an email to International@winchester.ac.uk or call +44 (0)1962 827023

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