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COURSE OVERVIEW

The emphasis of the programme is on business process analysis, specification of computer information systems solutions, and the client management, commercial, operational, human and organisational aspects of delivering information system development projects.

The theme of future-thinking is developed through a focus on researching, evaluating and achieving insights from trends in the technological and business environment. The programme incorporates a number of current and emerging subject areas such as cyber security and risk management, data analytics and insight management. There is an emphasis on management of business transformation projects and value creation by thought leadership, product-service development and intellectual property management.

Creativity and innovation are developed through the juxtaposition of future-oriented themes and a focus on the analysis of business processes; the design, development and implementation of computer information systems solutions; strategic brand management; and knowledge-based client relationships.

Students develop an appreciation of responsible management through a focus on the moral and ethical responsibilities of business. This includes awareness of the need to generate sustainable value for their own business and client organisations, and to work for an inclusive and sustainable global economy. This supports the University's commitment to the Principles for Responsible Management Education.

On completing the course, students are able to meet the commercial challenges of managing and leading information systems development projects, implementation programmes and IT services businesses in complex and changing global markets.

Careers

Through both theoretical and applied learning this programme seeks to develop professionals who are able to make effective contributions to the sponsoring organisation within an information systems management context, and to provide a platform for continued development and a future career within the sector.

At the University of Winchester, we are committed to ensuring all our students gain employability skills to enable you to enter graduate level jobs and pursue the profession of your choice, for more information please read the Employability Statement.

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degree with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK

Learning and teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market.

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc.), you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 1 (Level 4): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 264 hours
Independent learning: 684 hours
Placement: 252 hours

Year 2 (Level 5): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 228 hours
Independent learning: 720 hours
Placement: 252 hours

Year 3 (Level 6): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 156 hours
Independent learning: 1044 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course.

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on our King Alfred Campus or at West Downs, Winchester.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. For further details on assessment types contact our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 1 (Level 4)*:

81% coursework
13% written exams
6% practical exams

Year 2 (Level 5)*:

88% coursework
6% written exams
6% practical exams

Year 3 (Level 6)*:

95% coursework
0% written exams
5% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures

Entry requirements

Participants must be employed by a sponsoring business. Programme-specific entry requirements apply, as agreed with the sponsoring business.

Candidates for the Degree Apprenticeship should normally have a minimum of 104-112 points* at A2 (Grades BCC) or an equivalent for example BTEC DMM. You will also require Maths and English Language GCSE grade A*- C. We will individually evaluate candidates who do not meet these requirements, but have workplace experience or recognised prior learning.

*Note: Different employers will identify their specific entry requirements

To secure an apprenticeship you will need to gain a place on this degree apprenticeship you will have been successful on application and interview as conducted by the sponsoring business in conjunction with the University of Winchester.

Alternatively, you may be seeking career enhancement within your current role. In this case you will need your employer to support you by offering a Degree Apprenticeship with the University of Winchester.

In the absence of formal learning qualifications applications are welcomed from persons who can demonstrate relevant work experience, including work in a voluntary capacity. The course structure actively supports claims for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL).

Additional requirements

Candidates are invited to attend an interview or assessment centre organised by the business in conjunction with the University of Winchester.

Course enquiries and applications

Programme Leader: Stella McKnight
Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 826478
Email: Stella.McKnight@winchester.ac.uk

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester at one of our Open Days.


Year 1 (Level 4)

Semester 1 Credits

Managing Finance 15

The module focuses on the fundamental roles of management accounting, with particular reference to small businesses. The module will involve students in the gathering of information for budgeting, cost analysis and monitoring purposes.  Students will develop knowledge and skills related to planning, controlling and monitoring activities to improve the efficiency of a business, and will develop an appreciation of the ethical and responsible considerations associated with the financial management of a sustainable business. Skills in project appraisal will be developed though activities which seek to assess the viability of a range of business projects.

Information Systems and Organisations 15

The aim of the module is to introduce the application of information, information systems and information technologies within organisations and understand the impact of such systems on organisational performance. Students will develop an understanding of the project lifecycle focussing on the importance of the customer and will look at the process involved in creating information systems by learning how to investigate and define customer requirements and understand future needs. Undertaking this module gives students an introduction to information systems and organisations, giving them the skills to work effectively within an IS organisation on projects and giving them the base for understanding other IS modules within the degree programme.

Introduction to Academic and Professional Studies 15

The aim of this module is to develop student understanding of the skills and competencies required in both academic and professional environments.  Students will work individually and in teams to develop the knowledge and skills required to plan, design and conduct a research project.  Students will have the opportunity to engage in a range of activities which will build industry awareness at a national and international level; enhance communication and negotiation skills; and increase awareness of the importance of evidence based thinking and reflective practice.  This module provides the foundation for continuing personal and professional development building confidence to provide students with the potential to maximise academic and career aspirations.

Work Based Studies – Professional Development 15

Semesters 1 and 2

The aim of this work-based learning module is to help the employee develop a deeper-understanding of how their organisation operates, and to help them to recognise how their own contribution can form the foundations of a successful career within the company.  To achieve this, students will reflect on themselves, their skills and how they fit within the company.   With support from a work based mentor the employee will identify their development needs, manage their own development and reflect critically on their learning. They will become aware of how certain processes and policies within the workplace contribute to this and how they can operate effectively to enhance job satisfaction, career development and personal fulfilment.   This module provides the foundation for continuing personal and professional development building confidence to provide students with the potential to maximise academic and career aspirations.

Semester 2 Credits

Work Based Studies – Organisational Functions in Context 15

Semester 2 and summer

This module is designed to allow flexibility of study, to enable employed students to gain credit for work based activities, and to contribute to the continued development of academic and professional skills. The module aims to develop student understanding of the relationships and dependencies that exist between different functions within an organisation, and their contribution to the overall performance of the business, with particular reference to the key functions within the organisation in which they are employed.

Students will work individually, in groups and with their workplace mentor to develop the knowledge and skills required to analyse, and present, ideas and coherent arguments both orally and in writing. Students will build on their communication, negotiation and reflective practice skills, to support their on-going personal, academic and professional development.

IS Security 15

The aim of this module is to introduce concepts of IT security in order to understand the security threats to an IT system and the operational impact of these threats on an organisation. The module will explore different protection methods for data and develop knowledge of security policies and procedures, including risk assessments, and how these procedures can be implemented and maintained. This module will introduce topical case studies of attacks on organisational information systems, highlighting the business consequences.

Understanding Markets 15

An understanding of markets is central to the study of business.  This module takes a sociological perspective of markets and market economics, encouraging discussion of how individual consumers, industrial firms, governments, and other networks and organisations affect consumer culture and shape market dynamics. Students will consider current consumer trends and the circumstances in which markets succeed or fail.  Consumer dependence on social and economic structures will be explored, along with trends towards increasing consumer power, consumer participation and political consumerism.  The implications of new and emerging markets will also be discussed, as will historical and cultural aspects of the move towards consumerism.  The module provides an introduction to a range of data sources and analytical tools concerning market and consumer trends.

Responsible Management 15

This module introduces the principles of responsible management including those in the United Nations PRME and Global Compact frameworks. The module draws on and engages with on-going debate concerning the social, economic, environmental, moral and ethical dimensions of business in a global world. Students will identify key stakeholders in organisations, and how responsible management is applied in different industry sectors. They will begin to reflect on their own personal and professional values and their contribution to creating future sustainable business value.

Work Based Studies – Professional Development 15

Semesters 1 and 2

The aim of this work-based learning module is to help the employee develop a deeper-understanding of how their organisation operates, and to help them to recognise how their own contribution can form the foundations of a successful career within the company.  To achieve this, students will reflect on themselves, their skills and how they fit within the company.   With support from a work based mentor the employee will identify their development needs, manage their own development and reflect critically on their learning. They will become aware of how certain processes and policies within the workplace contribute to this and how they can operate effectively to enhance job satisfaction, career development and personal fulfilment.   This module provides the foundation for continuing personal and professional development building confidence to provide students with the potential to maximise academic and career aspirations.

Year 2 (Level 5)

Semester 1 Credits

Work Based Studies – Applied Project Management 15

Semesters 1 and 2

This module is designed to allow flexibility of study, to enable employed students to gain credit for work based activities, and to contribute to the continued development of academic and professional skills.  The aim of this work-based learning module is to build on the student’s existing knowledge of Project Management and Project Management documentation. Through undertaking research into their own organisation students will develop both a theoretical and practical understanding of project management.  In completing this module students will draw upon learning from other modules, and reflect on how this module can support the students’ professional development and enhance their performance as effective practitioners. The module will encourage students to demonstrate the use of different management and communication styles within a team and project environment.  Students will build upon previous personal and interpersonal skills and assess the impact of their own communication styles and team member’s styles on team dynamics. Students will reflect on the challenges of managing a project for themselves with the view to developing students’ awareness of application in the contemporary business world.

Introduction to Project Management 15

This module teaches key aspects involved in project management. The range of perspectives in project management studies are analysed both in theory and in practice. Students will explore roles and responsibilities of those involved in project management and explore documentation from planning to reporting used and how to deliver a successful project. The module will look at the management of projects including lifecycles and investigate the importance of relationship management focussing on stakeholders and teams.  

Risk Management and Cyber-security 15

The aim of this module is to further develop student understanding of IS Security.  The main focus of this module will be to explore key themes, trends and issues in cyber-security, policing and governance of the internet and business vulnerabilities.  The module provides students with an opportunity to analyse risk management, information risk assessment, risk mitigation, management standards and methodologies, implementing a risk management strategy and business continuity planning.

Management and Leadership 15

The pressures on managers and leaders in today’s complex organisations are immense.  The emphasis on performance, efficiency and effectiveness together with the global competition for managerial jobs places a premium on managerial and leadership skills.  This module introduces some of the latest ideas in the field whilst simultaneously evaluating them from a practical, ethical and international perspective. Students will explore the role of power in organisations and critically evaluate how power and influence is exercised in the managerial role. The module is also aimed at helping students to develop some of the skills involved in managing and leading people, thereby cultivating the self-awareness that characterises outstanding managers and leaders.    The aim of the module therefore is to develop informed, critical and responsible managers who have the confidence to lead others in a way that is effective, ethical and consistent with their values.  

Semester 2 Credits

Work Based Studies – Applied Project Management 15

Semesters 1 and 2

This module is designed to allow flexibility of study, to enable employed students to gain credit for work based activities, and to contribute to the continued development of academic and professional skills.  The aim of this work-based learning module is to build on the student’s existing knowledge of Project Management and Project Management documentation. Through undertaking research into their own organisation students will develop both a theoretical and practical understanding of project management.  In completing this module students will draw upon learning from other modules, and reflect on how this module can support the students’ professional development and enhance their performance as effective practitioners. The module will encourage students to demonstrate the use of different management and communication styles within a team and project environment.  Students will build upon previous personal and interpersonal skills and assess the impact of their own communication styles and team member’s styles on team dynamics. Students will reflect on the challenges of managing a project for themselves with the view to developing students’ awareness of application in the contemporary business world.

Information Management and Data Analytics 15

Generating the right information and insight for decision-makers is a major challenge for many organisations. The challenge lies in coping with a burgeoning amount of multifarious data, analysing data and ensuring it reaches decision-makers in a timely and meaningful manner. Information Management and Data Analytics encapsulate the challenges faced in deriving insights from data to underpin fact-based decisions.  This module examines the different types of systems and data that can flow into organisations. It evaluates the characteristics and value of these different data sources. With an awareness of the nature of data, a model of how data may be creatively integrated and analysed to deliver insights will be explored. Data analytics will then be explored given the demands of decision makers to: segment and target markets, predict the development of markets, assess customer profitability and the lifetime value of customers and to understand social and network relationships.

Applied Management Research in Practice 15

This module aims to provide a foundation for students to develop their understanding and application of research methods for academic and professional purposes. Students will explore a variety of research approaches and will develop practical research skills including problem definition and scope; effective research design; and data collection and analysis.  In addition, students will develop an appreciation of ethical implications of the research process to facilitate responsible research practice.

Work Based Studies – Management and Leadership 15

This module will further explore leadership and management to place them as future leaders of the business. BSc students will focus on technical management and BA students will focus on business management. Students will also understand differences between management and leadership and recognise any inter-relationships between them. The module is also aimed at helping students to develop some of the skills involved in managing and leading people, thereby further cultivating the self-awareness that characterises outstanding managers and leaders.    

Creativity, Design and Innovation 15

Successful and sustainable organisations depend upon their ability to generate creative new products and services, and finding new ways of doing business. Entrepreneurial ventures rely upon new ideas to establish themselves in the market. Without creativity, design and innovation established organisations would lose sources of advantage to competitors. The processes through which creativity, design and innovation occur, and how these can be encouraged at individual, team and organisation level, are, therefore, important concerns for management. Creativity, design and innovation can be seen from different perspectives, including responsible management, marketing, leadership, knowledge and learning, finance, operations, and strategy. As such, study of creativity, design and innovation helps to develop a broad appreciation of the interconnections between apparently diverse business and management subject areas.

Year 3 (Level 6)

Semester 1 Credits

Sustainability Strategy in Practice 15

This module considers the process of strategic management under the aegis of the principles of responsible management. It includes the analysis of the external business environment; internal competences and cultures; choices available to enterprises, given their cultures and stakeholder expectations and business opportunities; and the implementation of strategic change within organisations. The module draws upon current academic theories and debates, providing students with a holistic appreciation of the environmental, ethical and economic sustainability issues associated with strategic decision making and a platform for discussion of the conflicting approaches to the management of the strategic process, with a critical appraisal of sustainable management in particular.

Students will have the opportunity to work collaboratively in considering strategy both at corporate and operational levels and, through the use of an interactive business simulation tool, will be able to test their own business decisions on a variety of complex business issues.

Insight Management 15

This module will provide students with an understanding of the insight management function of an organisation and will equip them with key skills in insight generation and delivery for business decision-making.  The module will develop students’ ability to critically evaluate approaches to generating ideas and insight through creative thinking techniques, within both divergent and convergent thinking processes.   It will provide them with the knowledge and skills to identify and evaluate an organisational problem, and then to effectively draw and interpret insights so that they have an impact at both managerial and board levels of organisations. The ethical implications of the use of insight management techniques will recur throughout the module.

Strategic Brand Management 15

This module takes a strategic approach to branding management.  It considers a broad range of tools, techniques and theories that help build equity and so drive brand performance. Students are encouraged to adopt a strategic brand perspective, involving a detailed understanding of the role brands play for organisations in creating customer value.  The module is broadly structured around four main areas; i) brand management challenges; the internal and external forces that create barriers for managers in their brand building initiatives;  ii) the impact, cultivation and measurement of brand equity and the inter-related strategies for building effective brand identities; iii) managing brand portfolios and assessing alternative brand leveraging strategies and finally iv) how brand performance is tracked and measured within organisations using a variety of performance metrics to assess the effectives of strategic brand management efforts.

IT Portfolio 30

Semesters 1, 2 or summer

You can choose from either the Dissertation, IT portfolio module, or Consultancy Project.

The Design Portfolio provides a vehicle for students to demonstrate the extent to which they have managed the final transition from a tutor-led approach to student centred learning. A software design project is chosen, designed, curated in the context of other software design projects completed throughout the degree and then critically evaluated, with the support of a supervisor. It enables students to demonstrate their capacity for sustained independent thought, learning and critical reflection in a major piece of work.

The chosen software design challenge will normally be set in the context of a sponsoring organisation. Agreement will be reached between the sponsoring organisation and a supervisor as to what would constitute a relevant software design challenge. The student would be expected to set this challenge in the context of a number of previously completed software designs, undertaken in their sponsoring organisation. A ‘document’ would be produced made up of:

• Summary descriptions of previous software design challenges.
• A demonstration of the current software design challenge.
• An evaluation of the software design decisions made with the current software design challenge.
• A justification of the qualities of their current software design challenge in terms of innovation, effectiveness, applicability and quality*.

*Definitions of these terms:

Innovation: viewed through the development of new software design, or improvements to existing software design.

Effectiveness: as experienced by substantial improvements being enjoyed by the beneficiaries of the software design.

Applicability: so that others may benefit from the software design.

Design Quality: in that the software design and any user interfaces are designed to a high standard, consider fully the needs of those who will use the software and offer an efficient, clear and reliable solution.

 

Consultancy Project 30

You can choose from either the Dissertation, IT portfolio module, or Consultancy Project.

This module aims to provide the opportunity for students to carry out a consultancy project in a relevant field. The practical project will enable students to demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills gained in their programme either with an external organisation, or using an internal client as a detailed case study. Students will be required to work towards a tangible and timely outcome. The students operate in effect as trainee management consultants for their external organisation or internal client and are expected to undertake relevant research and present conclusions and recommendations that are intended to benefit the organisation. Students are expected to take a high degree of responsibility for their own learning and will negotiate the structure of the project with their supervisor, and the organisation, where appropriate.

Dissertation 30

Semesters 1, 2 and summer

You can choose from either the Dissertation, IT portfolio module, or Consultancy Project.

The module provides the opportunity for students to research an area of particular interest to them and is relevant to their studies. For students undertaking a yearlong work placement the dissertation will usually be set in the context of the host organisation. The module contributes to the continued professional and academic development of students in the application of research knowledge and skills acquired throughout their programme. As students are required to manage the research project, the dissertation provides a vehicle for them to demonstrate the extent to which they have managed the transition from tutor-led to student-centred learning.

Semester 2 Credits

Intellectual Properties and Information Rights 15

This module considers the different forms of intellectual properties created in the software development and information technology sectors, and how these might be utilised for commercial purposes.  Particular emphasis is given to the protection and utilisation of intellectual property rights in computer software programmes by copyright.  The module considers how an understanding of intellectual properties is vital to knowledge-based businesses, and needs to be incorporated into the conceptualisation, design and implementation of new information technologies.  Emerging information technologies create challenges in terms of information rights such as data protection and privacy, access to public information, and information sharing through social media.  Students will be introduced to information rights laws and the trends shaping real-time development of protections in this area.

Business Transformation and Process Re-design 15

Business transformation and process redesign, provides a hands on, skill building approach to student learning and application.  All organisations are engaged in change management and improvement activities.  The drive for efficiency and the need for customer centric activities being at the centre of this drive.  The aim of the unit is to provide students with the principles of improvement and business transformation, and the opportunity to apply those principles.  The unit will cover a variety of high performance methodologies such as operational excellence, lean, six sigma, and systems thinking.  These methodologies will be presented within a transformation cycle framework, providing students with an ability to analyse change situation using various business improvement systems, models and techniques.  Critical, Lateral and creative thinking skills/conceptual blockbusting will be applied to analyse and redesign situations. Systems thinking (to include Business process re-engineering) in the era of distributed organisation / cloud-based systems will be introduced.  To enable students to apply the methods, managing organisational change and process change, and the role of Change agents in the engagement of employees in business transformation will be explored.

Knowledge-based Client Relationships 15

Knowledge-based professional services firms in fields such as systems design, software programming and management consultancy achieve competitive advantage by creating and sharing knowledge within enduring and profitable client relationships.  It can be argued that whilst technology is important in delivering these professional services, effective client relationships are based on an understanding of the nature of knowledge, how to bring people together, and finding ways to interactively develop new knowledge.  This needs to be achieved against a background of rapid change and fragmentation of value chains into constellations or eco-systems.  This module considers how to add value to client decision making and capabilities, mechanisms for knowledge transfer and firm-wide relationship management, co-creation of knowledge, and how to price and profit from knowledge-based relationships.  The module draws upon cognitive learning theories and is broadly-scoped to be applicable to students at all stages of involvement in internal and external client relationships.

Consultancy Project 30

You can choose from either the Dissertation, IT portfolio module, or Consultancy Project.

This module aims to provide the opportunity for students to carry out a consultancy project in a relevant field. The practical project will enable students to demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills gained in their programme either with an external organisation, or using an internal client as a detailed case study. Students will be required to work towards a tangible and timely outcome. The students operate in effect as trainee management consultants for their external organisation or internal client and are expected to undertake relevant research and present conclusions and recommendations that are intended to benefit the organisation. Students are expected to take a high degree of responsibility for their own learning and will negotiate the structure of the project with their supervisor, and the organisation, where appropriate.

IT Portfolio 30

Semesters 1, 2 or summer

You can choose from either the Dissertation, IT portfolio module, or Consultancy Project.

The Design Portfolio provides a vehicle for students to demonstrate the extent to which they have managed the final transition from a tutor-led approach to student centred learning. A software design project is chosen, designed, curated in the context of other software design projects completed throughout the degree and then critically evaluated, with the support of a supervisor. It enables students to demonstrate their capacity for sustained independent thought, learning and critical reflection in a major piece of work.

The chosen software design challenge will normally be set in the context of a sponsoring organisation. Agreement will be reached between the sponsoring organisation and a supervisor as to what would constitute a relevant software design challenge. The student would be expected to set this challenge in the context of a number of previously completed software designs, undertaken in their sponsoring organisation. A ‘document’ would be produced made up of:

• Summary descriptions of previous software design challenges.
• A demonstration of the current software design challenge.
• An evaluation of the software design decisions made with the current software design challenge.
• A justification of the qualities of their current software design challenge in terms of innovation, effectiveness, applicability and quality*.

*Definitions of these terms:

Innovation: viewed through the development of new software design, or improvements to existing software design.

Effectiveness: as experienced by substantial improvements being enjoyed by the beneficiaries of the software design.

Applicability: so that others may benefit from the software design.

Design Quality: in that the software design and any user interfaces are designed to a high standard, consider fully the needs of those who will use the software and offer an efficient, clear and reliable solution.

 

Dissertation 30

Semesters 1, 2 and summer

You can choose from either the Dissertation, IT portfolio module, or Consultancy Project.

The module provides the opportunity for students to research an area of particular interest to them and is relevant to their studies. For students undertaking a yearlong work placement the dissertation will usually be set in the context of the host organisation. The module contributes to the continued professional and academic development of students in the application of research knowledge and skills acquired throughout their programme. As students are required to manage the research project, the dissertation provides a vehicle for them to demonstrate the extent to which they have managed the transition from tutor-led to student-centred learning.

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Course Tuition Fees 

Part-time: £1,200 per 15 credit module. The number of credits available per module may vary. Total cost: £9,000 per level of study.
The Government has committed to paying two-thirds of the cost of any tuition fees for degree apprentices. Employers are required to pay the remaining fees.

Costs to Student/Apprentice

  • Apprentices are full-time employees and will be entitled to a wage and paid time off to study
  • There are no tuition fees

Employer Information

How much will it cost an employing business per apprentice?

The apprentice will be an employee who will work for a business throughout the programme - a market-rate salary is anticipated. The funding you are eligible for is determined by the number of people you employ, the annual payroll of your company and the age of the learner.

  • Businesses with a wage bill below £3 million - The Government will pay 90% of the tuition fees for apprentices of any age, for business who will not be paying the apprenticeship levy
  • Businesses with a wage bill above £3 million - From May 2017 organisations will be able to use their Apprenticeship Levy contributions towards the cost of tuition fees

Employers who do not have sufficient levy payments to cover the full cost of tuition fees, will also be eligible for the 90% government funding

Additional support arrangements

  • Small businesses (fewer than 50 employees) hiring an apprentice under 19-years-of-age when the apprenticeship commences will pay no tuition fees at all
  • All businesses employing an apprentice under 19-years-of-age, a care leaver up to 24-years-of-age or an adult with additional needs will qualify for an extra support payment of £1,000

Additional costs

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Optional

Core text

Multiple copies of core text are held within the library and e-books are identified where possible, however due to limited availability students are recommended to purchase a copy for their own use. It is possible for students to purchase second-hand copies. Cost: £50 - £300 per year

Printing and binding

Students may be required to pay for the costs of dissertation printing and binding (if applicable). Cost: £10

Key course details

Duration
3 years part-time
Typical offer
104-112 points
Location
King Alfred Campus or at West Downs, University of Winchester