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COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Childhood Studies achieved 100% overall satisfaction as rated by final-year undergraduate students in the 2019 National Student Survey
  • Focus on children's development from conception to 11 years
  • Prepare for practice in Early Years settings with placements in years 2 and 3.
  • Combine academic and practical skills

The BA (Hons) Childhood Studies is for you if you are passionate about working with children and their families and accord importance to children’s social and emotional development and mental health. Your degree will take a holistic approach, focusing on children’s education, care and development from conception to 11 years and drawing on the disciplines of psychology, health, education, social policy and internationalisation perspectives to develop you as a reflective graduate ready to work in multi‐professional contexts.

A key feature of the programme is its emphasis on equipping you for high quality practice. There is preparation for practice in Year 1 and placements in Years 2 and 3 in Early Years settings and Reception classes in Primary Schools. These offer you the opportunity to relate theory to practice in a meaningful way. 

Year 1 will support you in orienting to University level study and introduces foundational topics within Childhood Studies. Years 2 and 3 gradually extend your knowledge and understanding, drawing on national and international research and practice and the extensive and wide‐ranging experience and research interests of the tutor team.

You will be helped to access cutting edge knowledge and to translate it into practical application on placement. By combining academic and applied skills, you will graduate in a strong position for finding employment in the sector.

Careers

There are a variety of opportunities for graduates in different Early Years settings including roles as Early Years Practitioners /Managers, Early Years Teaching (QTS), Primary Teaching, Teaching Assistants, social work and other allied professions working with children and families.

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Study abroad

For more information see our Study Abroad section.

Learning and teaching

A variety of learning and teaching methods will be used; lectures, seminars, tutorials, peer group and individual presentations. A particular feature of the programme concerns placements in the second and third years which allow you to develop and reflect on your own practice and relate theory to practice in a systematic way. Taught modules will draw on your placement experiences to highlight the interconnections and relevance of the different components of your degree. 

You will be supported in your study. The first module will include study skills and personal development planning. Over time, you will move towards more independent and self‐directed study, through strategies that include guided reading and taking part in discussions on the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

The emphasis is on placing graduates in a strong position to secure employment in a competitive market or to progress to further study.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 1 (Level 4): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 300 hours
Independent learning: 900 hours

Year 2 (Level 5): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 300 hours
Independent learning: 852 hours
Placement: 48 hours

Year 3 (Level 6): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 264 hours
Independent learning: 900 hours
Placement: 36 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course.

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester.

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

The University library is open seven days a week, 24 hours a day.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 1 (Level 4)*:

94% coursework
0% written exams
6% practical exams

Year 2 (Level 5)*:

100% coursework
0% written exams
0% practical exams

Year 3 (Level 6)*:

100% coursework
0% written exams
0% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.

 

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2020 Entry: 104-120 points

GCSE A*‐C or 9‐4 pass in English Language or a level 2 literacy qualification and GCSE A* ‐ C or 9‐4 pass in mathematics or a level 2 numeracy qualification is required

International Baccalaureate: 104-120 points to include a minimum of 2 Higher level IB certificates at grade 4 or above.

If English is not your first language: Year 1/Level 4: IELTS 6.0 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in writing or equivalent

Course Enquiries and applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234
Send us a message

International students

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by emailing our International Recruitment Team at International@winchester.ac.uk or calling +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Days.

Year 1 (Level 4)

Modules Credits

Higher Education and Early Years 15

Students will have the opportunity to address the study skills needed to work within a programme that will combine academic challenge and demanding, yet achievable expectations of practical competence. They will carry out activities considering the nature of evidence including electronic sources of information. Students will learn to reflect on their own development through self study.  Students will be introduced to needs analysis / self audit procedures in order to be able to set targets and use action planning to work towards updating their own knowledge and competencies.

Personal, Social and Emotional Development 15

This module explores social and emotional development as the bedrock for children’s development. An historical overview of theory is provided from this perspective before focusing on theories and concepts with particular contemporary significance. These will include attachment theory, sociocultural theories, ecological systems theory and ideas concerning the importance of ‘mindset’.  Students will be helped to think about topics from the child’s perspective and to reflect on the adult role in promoting children’s social and emotional development. The module draws on tutors’ research and knowledge exchange on these topics. 

Perspectives on Childhood 15

This module introduces the student to the idea that there are multiple perspectives for viewing childhood, and each different view leads to different emphases. Historical views of childhood will be explored, as will approaches used by different disciplines today.

Students will be helped to relate the standpoints of different disciplines to situations they may encounter in their future professional lives. They will begin to develop an understanding of how an awareness of different viewpoints may enrich understanding of the child and holistic child development.

Legislation on children’s rights will be covered. Contemporary ideas on the importance of children’s views will be discussed, along with methods of working with children to obtain their views. The importance of listening to the voice of the child and children’s agency will be considered.

Play and Learning Pedagogies 30

This module will introduce students to understanding how physical growth and learning develops in children aged 0-11 years. It will look at the historical development of knowledge and theoretical perspectives in this field, outlining both behaviourist and cognitive approaches.

It will look at the processes of learning across the age range: playing and exploring; active learning; and creating and thinking critically. Emphasis will be laid on what the adult can do to promote learning and this will include the creation of enabling environments.

 Students will engage in a range of creative workshops to explore the use of open ended materials and a range of learning contexts to support creativity in teaching and creativity in learning within the indoor and outdoor environment. Students will explore teaching strategies and resources used within other Early Years approaches such as Montessori, Reggio Emilia, Steiner, Forest School. The processes of learning will be examined. With regard to play, particular emphasis will be laid on Vygotsky’s ideas of imaginative play leading development in the young child. The links between imaginative play and both Theory of Mind and symbolic development will be outlined. Students will be encouraged to consider how these ideas are relevant to Early Years and Primary school aged children. The legislative frameworks for different age groups will be contrasted and the ways in which these promote or constrain learning through play and exploration will be discussed.

The Healthy Child 15

Good health is vital to the lives of children. It enables them to lead enjoyable and fulfilling lives and underpins achievements in early years, at school and in adult life. This module enables students to develop an understanding of the different dimensions of health and allows students to explore a holistic account of children’s development both in body and mind. This module will look at why health is an important theme for children’s wellbeing. Students will consider the socio-economic factors influencing child wellbeing. Students will be able to develop a deeper understanding of one specific health issue whilst considering theoretical models and health promotion approaches. Students will critique a chosen resource used to address these issues within a children’s setting.  This module enables students to consider recent research and government initiatives to address current health issues and ways of working with children to support their development of healthy lifestyles.

Early Years Foundations 15

This module explores a range of early years contexts and settings. Students will become familiar with the requirements of the statutory framework to ensure high quality provision and the importance of effective team work towards securing good outcomes for young children.  Theoretical perspectives and research will be explored to underpin knowledge, skills and understanding of curriculum provision and the identification of next steps in teaching and learning. Visits to settings will enable students to develop their understanding of the role of the adult in observation, planning, delivery and assessment in order to meet the holistic needs of all children.

The Unique Child 15

This module introduces models of need (e.g. medical/social/ educational) and key current legislation on equalities and inclusion. It begins to explore the implications for work with children and families.

Official achievement data for children will be examined so that students can identify groups of children who are achieving less well, examine factors thought to be behind this and initiatives designed to help.

The concept of implicit bias will be critically explored and research on the impact of teacher expectations presented.

Controversial cases that have been in the news recently will serve to help students begin to appreciate the evolving nature of ideas on equality and some of the tensions that may be involved. 

Year 2 (Level 5)

Modules Credits

Working with Parents, Carers and Families 15

This module aims to help students develop an understanding of the importance of building partnerships with parents and carers and families and of effective strategies for doing so. Research evidence for the impact of family involvement on outcomes for children will be examined.  The diversity of families will be central to the module. Issues of cultural differences and inclusion will be considered.

 Benefits and challenges of partnership working will be discussed together with ways to work with families who are hard to engage with.

Resilience in the Face of Challenges 15

This module builds upon the Level 4 module Social and Emotional Development and focuses on understanding the role of organisations including settings and schools in promoting children’s wellbeing and mental health. Statistics and reports that raise concerns about the mental health of children and young people will be reviewed. The concept of resilience will be examined and critically evaluated. Students will consider how the concept of resilience might help adults support children across a range of challenging life experiences and events, such as bereavement, having a parent in prison or the multiple moves and stress that might result from being in a military family. Children’s voices will feature strongly in the module. Students will also reflect on implications of the module for understanding and building their own resilience.

Policy and Provision 15

This module will look at current key early years, primary and inclusion policy initiatives and examine a range of influences on policy and strategy formation and the impact of policy on provision. Students will be helped to understand policy within social, historical, political and economic frameworks.  The focus will be principally on policy and strategies relating to the United Kingdom and England in particular, but wider perspectives will be addressed through international research and case studies to encourage students to begin to adopt a global stance.

Developing Practice (placement)

This placement module will enable students to undertake a range of core practice skills within an early years setting. Students will work in partnership with practitioners to develop their understanding and skills in working with young children. Through a process of observation and hands-on learning opportunities students will develop their skills in observing, planning and assessing children’s learning. By observing practitioners, they will gain a deeper understanding of the role of the adult towards curriculum provision, in addition to supporting and extending children’s learning.

They will extend their knowledge and application of the overarching principles of current statutory guidance, the importance of working in partnership with parents and developing their skills towards becoming a professional practitioner. Through a series of directed tasks, reflections and observations, submitted as part of the placement portfolio, they will demonstrate their knowledge, skills and understanding of the effective early years practitioner.

Safeguarding Children 15

This module aims to cover a variety of complex issues relating to the safeguarding of children.  Students will explore the concept of child protection and what constitutes abuse.  They will look at the importance of multi-disciplinary team working and the practitioners’ role and responsibilities within the safeguarding process. Students will also explore methods, techniques and processes relating to how to deal with safeguarding issues, including skills of listening to and communicating with children that practitioners need. 

A number of complex and challenging topics will be critically discussed encompassing children’s rights. Students will develop an understanding of emerging challenges – including on-line safety - looking at ways to help parents to keep their children safe as well as helping the children themselves.

Inclusion of Children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities 15

This module will provide a comprehensive understanding of Special Educational Needs and additional needs encountered within mainstream and specialist provision. It will highlight the importance of the role of the adult working in partnership with parents and the wider multi-disciplinary team to support the needs of the child and their family. Students will explore a range of practical and IT based strategies to support learning and development. Theoretical perspectives and research will ensure that students have a thorough understanding of the legislative duties towards equity, diversity and inclusion in the production and maintenance of statutory documentation and provision.

Year 2 Optional Modules
  • Play and creativity 15 credits
  • Enabling environments 15 credits

Optional Credits

Working with Parents, Carers and Families 15

This module aims to help students develop an understanding of the importance of building partnerships with parents and carers and families and of effective strategies for doing so. Research evidence for the impact of family involvement on outcomes for children will be examined.  The diversity of families will be central to the module. Issues of cultural differences and inclusion will be considered.

 Benefits and challenges of partnership working will be discussed together with ways to work with families who are hard to engage with.

Resilience in the Face of Challenges 15

This module builds upon the Level 4 module Social and Emotional Development and focuses on understanding the role of organisations including settings and schools in promoting children’s wellbeing and mental health. Statistics and reports that raise concerns about the mental health of children and young people will be reviewed. The concept of resilience will be examined and critically evaluated. Students will consider how the concept of resilience might help adults support children across a range of challenging life experiences and events, such as bereavement, having a parent in prison or the multiple moves and stress that might result from being in a military family. Children’s voices will feature strongly in the module. Students will also reflect on implications of the module for understanding and building their own resilience.

Policy and Provision 15

This module will look at current key early years, primary and inclusion policy initiatives and examine a range of influences on policy and strategy formation and the impact of policy on provision. Students will be helped to understand policy within social, historical, political and economic frameworks.  The focus will be principally on policy and strategies relating to the United Kingdom and England in particular, but wider perspectives will be addressed through international research and case studies to encourage students to begin to adopt a global stance.

Developing Practice (placement)

This placement module will enable students to undertake a range of core practice skills within an early years setting. Students will work in partnership with practitioners to develop their understanding and skills in working with young children. Through a process of observation and hands-on learning opportunities students will develop their skills in observing, planning and assessing children’s learning. By observing practitioners, they will gain a deeper understanding of the role of the adult towards curriculum provision, in addition to supporting and extending children’s learning.

They will extend their knowledge and application of the overarching principles of current statutory guidance, the importance of working in partnership with parents and developing their skills towards becoming a professional practitioner. Through a series of directed tasks, reflections and observations, submitted as part of the placement portfolio, they will demonstrate their knowledge, skills and understanding of the effective early years practitioner.

Safeguarding Children 15

This module aims to cover a variety of complex issues relating to the safeguarding of children.  Students will explore the concept of child protection and what constitutes abuse.  They will look at the importance of multi-disciplinary team working and the practitioners’ role and responsibilities within the safeguarding process. Students will also explore methods, techniques and processes relating to how to deal with safeguarding issues, including skills of listening to and communicating with children that practitioners need. 

A number of complex and challenging topics will be critically discussed encompassing children’s rights. Students will develop an understanding of emerging challenges – including on-line safety - looking at ways to help parents to keep their children safe as well as helping the children themselves.

Inclusion of Children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities 15

This module will provide a comprehensive understanding of Special Educational Needs and additional needs encountered within mainstream and specialist provision. It will highlight the importance of the role of the adult working in partnership with parents and the wider multi-disciplinary team to support the needs of the child and their family. Students will explore a range of practical and IT based strategies to support learning and development. Theoretical perspectives and research will ensure that students have a thorough understanding of the legislative duties towards equity, diversity and inclusion in the production and maintenance of statutory documentation and provision.

Year 2 Optional Modules
  • Play and creativity 15 credits
  • Enabling environments 15 credits

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

Towards a Graduate Career (employability) 15

This module is designed to support students in applying for posts or continuing study in a competitive market. The module will bring them up to date with current recruitment practices for both employment and for graduate study and with key factors at play in developing a graduate role. Students will gain insight into what employers and course providers are looking for. They will consider how to provide personal examples of the work-related skills developed in an Honours programme. They will reflect on how to showcase their values, knowledge, skills and experience so that they can demonstrate the impact they can make on outcomes for children and families.  Advice will be provided on preparing an application e.g. writing a curriculum vitae, writing a personal statement, responding to job competency requirements and preparing a presentation. Requirements for interviews will also be discussed. 

Advanced Practice (Placement) 30

This module will enable students to further develop and demonstrate their skills and understanding of the EYFS towards the observation, assessment, planning and delivery of high quality learning experiences for young children within an early year’s setting. Students will undertake a placement which enables them to  work in partnership with experienced practitioners undertaking a series of practice based activities that will enable the application and exploration of theory and research into everyday practice. Students will experience the importance of effective team working towards securing good outcomes for children, parents and the wider community. This module will draw upon learning from previously studied modules and will support the identification of topics for the student’s research project.

Promoting Positive Behaviour 15

Behaviour is an issue of perennial concern to many involved in working with children and families. This module helps students broaden and deepen their understanding of children’s social and emotional development and make the links between this body of knowledge and positive behaviour management. It is a capstone module that draws on, and further develops, some topics that students will have encountered earlier in their studies: now they are helped to apply this knowledge and understanding in promoting positive behaviour. The emphasis is on the conditions and adult behaviours that help children to flourish.  Based on self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000), behaviour is viewed through a ‘relatedness’ lens, a ‘competence’ lens and an ‘autonomy’ lens. Each lens offers a possible way of interpreting challenging behaviour and of generating constructive ways of addressing it. Required reading will include key journal articles related to the ‘lenses’.

Final Year Research Project 30

The final year research project takes the form of an original independent empirical investigation into an aspect of childhood. A critically informed understanding of the process of research is a vital part of an Honours degree. Students will explore examples of qualitative and quantitative approaches and consider the nature of empirical research. Reference will be made to the issues one needs to consider when research is conducted with children. It is structured to provide students who work with children and families with the skills to undertake small-scale research projects. The module will develop knowledge of independent research through a series of: practical workshops, seminars, formative feedback sessions.

Year 3 Optional Modules
  • Autistic Spectrum Differences 15 credits
  • Transitions 15 credits
  • Positive Psychology 15 credits
  • Primary Curriculum 15 credits
  • Children under three - development and practice 15 credits
  • International Perspectives 15 credits

Optional Credits

Towards a Graduate Career (employability) 15

This module is designed to support students in applying for posts or continuing study in a competitive market. The module will bring them up to date with current recruitment practices for both employment and for graduate study and with key factors at play in developing a graduate role. Students will gain insight into what employers and course providers are looking for. They will consider how to provide personal examples of the work-related skills developed in an Honours programme. They will reflect on how to showcase their values, knowledge, skills and experience so that they can demonstrate the impact they can make on outcomes for children and families.  Advice will be provided on preparing an application e.g. writing a curriculum vitae, writing a personal statement, responding to job competency requirements and preparing a presentation. Requirements for interviews will also be discussed. 

Advanced Practice (Placement) 30

This module will enable students to further develop and demonstrate their skills and understanding of the EYFS towards the observation, assessment, planning and delivery of high quality learning experiences for young children within an early year’s setting. Students will undertake a placement which enables them to  work in partnership with experienced practitioners undertaking a series of practice based activities that will enable the application and exploration of theory and research into everyday practice. Students will experience the importance of effective team working towards securing good outcomes for children, parents and the wider community. This module will draw upon learning from previously studied modules and will support the identification of topics for the student’s research project.

Promoting Positive Behaviour 15

Behaviour is an issue of perennial concern to many involved in working with children and families. This module helps students broaden and deepen their understanding of children’s social and emotional development and make the links between this body of knowledge and positive behaviour management. It is a capstone module that draws on, and further develops, some topics that students will have encountered earlier in their studies: now they are helped to apply this knowledge and understanding in promoting positive behaviour. The emphasis is on the conditions and adult behaviours that help children to flourish.  Based on self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000), behaviour is viewed through a ‘relatedness’ lens, a ‘competence’ lens and an ‘autonomy’ lens. Each lens offers a possible way of interpreting challenging behaviour and of generating constructive ways of addressing it. Required reading will include key journal articles related to the ‘lenses’.

Final Year Research Project 30

The final year research project takes the form of an original independent empirical investigation into an aspect of childhood. A critically informed understanding of the process of research is a vital part of an Honours degree. Students will explore examples of qualitative and quantitative approaches and consider the nature of empirical research. Reference will be made to the issues one needs to consider when research is conducted with children. It is structured to provide students who work with children and families with the skills to undertake small-scale research projects. The module will develop knowledge of independent research through a series of: practical workshops, seminars, formative feedback sessions.

Year 3 Optional Modules
  • Autistic Spectrum Differences 15 credits
  • Transitions 15 credits
  • Positive Psychology 15 credits
  • Primary Curriculum 15 credits
  • Children under three - development and practice 15 credits
  • International Perspectives 15 credits

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2020 Course Tuition Fees

 UK/EU

International

Year 1 £9,250 £13,500
Year 2 £9,250 £13,500
Year 3 £9,250 £13,500
Total £27,750 £40,500
Optional Sandwich Year £700 £700
Total with Sandwich Year £28,450 £41,200

If you are a UK or EU student starting your degree in September 2020, the first year will cost you £9,250*. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK and EU students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK/EU Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £112.50 and a 15 credit module is £1,687.

*The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year. 

ADDITIONAL COSTS

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Mandatory

Core texts: Books and other reading materials are very important to the Childhood Studies programme. Most can be purchased second hand or are available from the library. However, students would benefit from being able to spend £100 a year on books and other reading materials. Indicative cost: £100 per academic year.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check currently £40. Required before placement in Year 2. Indicative cost: £40

Printing and Binding: We are proud to offer free printing for all students to ensure that printing costs are not a potential financial barrier to student success. The University of Winchester and Winchester Student Union are champions of sustainability and therefore ask that all students consider the environment and print fairly. Students may be required to pay for the costs of dissertation binding. Indicative cost is £1.50-£3.

Travel costs (and accommodation if required) for work placements in Years 2 and 3.

Optional

Optional overseas Seminar Study Abroad Trip in Year 2 with other Interprofessional Studies Programmes. This is to Canada for one week. Indicative cost: £1000

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards.

Key course details

UCAS code
X305
Duration
3 years full-time; 6 years part-time
Typical offer
104-120 points
Location
On campus, Winchester