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COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Engage with and study some of the most topical and critical issues facing the world today
  • Examine religion’s potential role in supporting and enhancing development practices, and helping achieve just and sustainable peace
  • Study a unique degree which enables you to make a positive difference to the lives of people around the world
  • Benefit from the extensive resources and networks at the University’s Centre of Religion, Reconciliation and Peace (CRRP) as well as its Department of Theology, Religion and Philosophy
  • Become an expert in a field where there is an increase in international employment opportunities from NGOs and governmental bodies

Are you fascinated by the relationship between religion, conflict and peacebuilding and development in a globalised world? If so, this course could help you to play a future role in the pursuit of international peace.

On our unique and rewarding three-year programme you study three critical, highly topical, and deeply interrelated issues facing the world today. Drawing on examples from modern social contexts, you explore the crucial links between questions of religious identity, developmental issues, and conflict, with a particular focus on developmental and peacebuilding initiatives in conflict-torn regions in the world.

An important aim of the programme is to sharpen your awareness of the centrality of religion in conflict, development, and peacebuilding, through the analysis of selected case studies. You also develop an understanding of the work of groups and agencies active in the fields of reconciliation, peacebuilding and development, through fieldwork-based placements, giving you the necessary experience and exposure to maximise graduate employability in related sectors.

As a valued member of our academic community, you benefit from the world-class expertise of staff in the Centre of Religion, Reconciliation and Peacebuilding (CRRP), as well as from those in the Department of Theology, Religion and Philosophy (TRP).

In Year 1, you study introductions to Peace and Conflict Studies, Development, Religion and Peacebuilding Studies. In addition you explore five major Living Religions and take modules on Human Rights in the Global Political Economy.

In Year 2, you study Peacebuilding Mechanisms and Architecture and Themes and Issues in Development Studies as well as take a hands-on module preparing you for fieldwork.

In the summer before your final year you undertake a placement at a relevant organisation to develop your practical knowledge and understanding of the work of groups and agencies active in the fields of peacebuilding and development, and to enhance your employability.

In your final year, you write a dissertation on a topic directly linking religion with conflict, development and peacebuilding. You also study Specialism in Religion and Development, and Specialism in Religion and Peacebuilding.

In years 2 and 3 you can choose from a wide range of optional modules, which may include Religion, Ethics and War, New and Alternative Religions, Indigenous Religions, Hinduism and Modernity or Politics, Energy and the Environment amongst many others.

Our graduates bring a global perspective to the workplace as well as transferable skills in time management, conflict resolution, presentations and teamwork. They are prepared to address many of the complex issues facing the modern world.

These skills open up a number of career paths to you, including roles in agencies/NGOs and government bodies working either nationally or internationally in the fields of reconciliation, peacebuilding, services for refugees, development, sustainability and climate change, interfaith dialogue, and social enterprise.

You may also find rewarding roles in the fields of journalism, law, teaching or choose to pursue further studies.

Careers

Our graduates bring a global perspective to the workplace as well as transferable skills in time management, conflict resolution, presentations and teamwork. They are prepared to address many of the complex issues facing the modern world.

These skills open up a number of career paths to you, including roles in agencies/NGOs and government bodies working either nationally or internationally in the fields of reconciliation, peacebuilding, services for refugees, development, sustainability and climate change, interfaith dialogue, and social enterprise.

You may also find rewarding roles in the fields of journalism, law, teaching or choose to pursue further studies.

94.4% of our 2015/16 graduates (first degree and other undergraduate courses) were in employment and/or further study six months after completing their course (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey).

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for Applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and Teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market. 

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc., you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 1 (Level 4): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 192 hours
Independent learning: 1008 hours

Year 2 (Level 5): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 204 hours
Independent learning: 972 hours
Placement hours: 24 hours

Year 3 (Level 6): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 216 hours
Independent learning: 948 hours
Placement: 36 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course. 

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester.

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

The University library is open seven days a week, 24 hours a day.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 1 (Level 4)*:

81% coursework
6% written exams
13% practical exams

Year 2 (Level 5)*:

92% coursework
0% written exams
8% practical exams

Year 3 (Level 6)*:

88% coursework
0% written exams
12% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2020 Entry: 104-120 points

A GCSE A*-C or 9-4 pass in English Language is required.

International Baccalaureate: 104-120 points to include a minimum of 2 Higher level IB certificates at grade 4 or above.

If English is not your first language: IELTS 6.0 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in writing or equivalent

Course enquiries and applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234
Send us a message

International Students

International students seeking additional information about this programme can send an email to International@winchester.ac.uk or call +44 (0) 1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Days.

Year 1 (Level 4)

Modules Credits

Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies 15

This module aims to teach students the key concepts in peace and conflict studies. It covers the main theories related to understanding conflict, reconciliation and peacebuilding. It examines the application of theory to actual cases of historical and current conflict and invites students to propose solutions to situations of conflict after critically studying the evidence and theory.

Joining the Conversation 15

In this module we will focus on a key debate, topic or dilemma in the Christian tradition to collectively develop your academic skills. These skills will include textual analysis, research, note taking and academic writing. This module will show how lectures, reading and independent work might be utilised for effective written assessment. Students will be trained to read primary and secondary texts, and work within the parameters of Higher Education with increased confidence. Important topics for your success at university such as what constitutes good essay structure, understanding assessment criteria and how your work is marks, along with how to reference texts and avoid committing plagiarism will be introduced through this module.

Living Religions: Judaism and Islam 15

This module introduces students to the scholarly study of Jewish and Muslim traditions. It engages students in the study of a small selection of key themes in Judaism and Islam, notably gender and ritual as well as the study of religion and/in culture. It also provides students with a grounding in both traditions, including their historical background.

Global Christianities 15

Christianity is amongst the world’s most widely spread religions, but it is far from uniform in its regional variations. This module is designed to give an appreciation of the forms and variety of Christianity beyond the terrain of the Western world. The module will look at the split between the Western and Eastern Churches, but also the split between Northern and Southern forms of Christianity and the limits of these labels. Movements such as Pentecostalism will be explained and students will engage with Missiology and consider how it has been critiqued in post-colonial studies and whether these criticisms are entirely fair.

Introduction to Development Studies 15

This module explores the main concepts and approaches related to development studies. It covers the main theories on development, and looks at the current state of development worldwide as well as historical examples of development efforts in different parts of the globe. Using individual case studies students will be invited to apply theory in order to critically analyse areas of developmental success and failure.

Development, Religion and Peacebuilding 15

This module aims to examine key themes linking development, religion, and peacebuilding. It explores the complexities of religious activism, conflict, peacebuilding and development by looking at research on, and relevant theoretical approaches to, key issues. Real-world cases will be examined to illustrate the central concepts, and students will be invited to suggest solutions to particular problems after critically studying the evidence and theory. 

Living Religions: Hinduism and Buddhism 15

This module introduces students to the scholarly study of Hindu and Buddhist traditions. It starts off exploring key issues in the study of religion, such as different ways of thinking about religion, definitional issues, and differences in outsider and insider approaches. It then engages students in the study of a small selection of key themes in Hinduism and Buddhism. Exploring a few selected theoretical frameworks on ritual, gender, etc., students will be encouraged to apply theory to the phenomena they study, and to learn to differentiate between description and analysis, and between theory and data.

Human Rights in the Global Political Economy 15

Human rights have been called the ‘idea of our time.’ In the post-World War Two period this ‘idea’ has achieved a totemic status, associated with civility and modernity. Against this, however, are the widespread reports of torture, genocide, disappearances, ethnic cleansing, political prisoners, the suppression of trade unions and democracy movements, and willful deprivation of access to the basic necessities of life.

One of the causes for the apparent disjuncture between the optimism represented by the idea of human rights, and the pessimism engendered by media reports of widespread violation of human rights, can be found in what John Vincent has called ‘human rights talk’. Human rights is not a singular discourse, but three overlapping discourses: philosophy, law and politics. We will critically explore these three discourses historically, culturally and in their contemporary form, and seek to gain an insight into the role of human rights under conditions of present-day globalization.

Year 2 (Level 5)

Modules Credits

Peace-building Mechanisms and Architecture 15

This module examines the key ideas and conceptual frameworks relating to the mechanisms and architecture necessary for peacebuilding. It covers the main theories pertaining to the legal, political, economic, and social institutions crucial for reconciliation and for building peaceful societies. It explores the practical application of theoretical concepts to various cases of peacebuilding, empowering students to draw lessons from these and to suggest alternative solutions after critically studying the evidence and theory.

Themes and Issues in Development Studies 15

This module aims to equip students with the knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary to engage analytically and critically with advanced themes and issues in the study of development. It covers the main theories related to advanced concepts not covered, or touched upon only briefly, in the introductory level 4 (mandatory) module on development. It looks at various practical cases, and enables students to draw lessons from these, develop potential solutions to key problems, as well as scrutinise critical insights from practice. 

Advanced Themes and Issues in Development Studies 15

This module will examine the main theoretical approaches and conceptual frameworks that link religion, peacebuilding and development. It will explore religious ideology, identity, and practice, and how this intermeshes with a range of institutions, serving in some instances to enhance, and in others to hinder, developmental and peacebuilding efforts and agendas. By examining case studies from a range of socio-cultural and religious contexts, it will enable students to scrutinise the insights from practice, learn from these, and propose solutions to problems of development and conflict informed by local knowledge as well as theoretical perspectives.

Fieldwork Preparation Module 15

The aim of this module is to develop students’ practical knowledge and understanding of the challenges of working individually or with organisations active in the fields of peacebuilding and development, and to enhance graduate employability. Students will learn what it takes to implement research projects, as well as development and peacebuilding projects in various contexts. Also, students will understand the intended and unintended effects that their work has in developing and conflict-affected countries.

Year 2 Optional Modules
  • Christianity, Race and Colonialism
  • Aspects of Islam
  • Hinduism and Modernity
  • Buddhism: Traditions and Transformations
  • Judaism in the Contemporary World
  • Indigenous Religions
  • New and Alternative Religions
  • Religion, Ethics, and War
  • The Church and Politics
  • Field Studies
  • Independent Study Module (ISM)
  • Political and Religious Themes in the Modern Near and Middle East
  • Global Governance
  • The War on Terror and the Axis of Evil and Beyond
  • Discourses of War

Optional Credits

Peace-building Mechanisms and Architecture 15

This module examines the key ideas and conceptual frameworks relating to the mechanisms and architecture necessary for peacebuilding. It covers the main theories pertaining to the legal, political, economic, and social institutions crucial for reconciliation and for building peaceful societies. It explores the practical application of theoretical concepts to various cases of peacebuilding, empowering students to draw lessons from these and to suggest alternative solutions after critically studying the evidence and theory.

Themes and Issues in Development Studies 15

This module aims to equip students with the knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary to engage analytically and critically with advanced themes and issues in the study of development. It covers the main theories related to advanced concepts not covered, or touched upon only briefly, in the introductory level 4 (mandatory) module on development. It looks at various practical cases, and enables students to draw lessons from these, develop potential solutions to key problems, as well as scrutinise critical insights from practice. 

Advanced Themes and Issues in Development Studies 15

This module will examine the main theoretical approaches and conceptual frameworks that link religion, peacebuilding and development. It will explore religious ideology, identity, and practice, and how this intermeshes with a range of institutions, serving in some instances to enhance, and in others to hinder, developmental and peacebuilding efforts and agendas. By examining case studies from a range of socio-cultural and religious contexts, it will enable students to scrutinise the insights from practice, learn from these, and propose solutions to problems of development and conflict informed by local knowledge as well as theoretical perspectives.

Fieldwork Preparation Module 15

The aim of this module is to develop students’ practical knowledge and understanding of the challenges of working individually or with organisations active in the fields of peacebuilding and development, and to enhance graduate employability. Students will learn what it takes to implement research projects, as well as development and peacebuilding projects in various contexts. Also, students will understand the intended and unintended effects that their work has in developing and conflict-affected countries.

Year 2 Optional Modules
  • Christianity, Race and Colonialism
  • Aspects of Islam
  • Hinduism and Modernity
  • Buddhism: Traditions and Transformations
  • Judaism in the Contemporary World
  • Indigenous Religions
  • New and Alternative Religions
  • Religion, Ethics, and War
  • The Church and Politics
  • Field Studies
  • Independent Study Module (ISM)
  • Political and Religious Themes in the Modern Near and Middle East
  • Global Governance
  • The War on Terror and the Axis of Evil and Beyond
  • Discourses of War

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

Dissertation 30

In conversation with a member of academic staff, students select an appropriate area of investigation. In 8-10,000 words, students must engage with their chosen topic using critical methodologies, evidence and argument. The topic chosen must be one which relates to the subject matter of their Programme and which permits the demonstration of independent research, study and reflection.

Specialism in Religion and Development 15

The module provides an in-depth exploration of a particular topic or area in the study of development, peacebuilding and religion in line with the research expertise and published outputs (realised or potential) of teaching staff. The main debates, controversies and problems will be considered and methodologies examined. Independent study on the part of the students to explore particular themes, texts, figures, or areas around the subject, which will be based in contemporary scholarly resources, is a key component. Students will be required to take initiative on devising their assessment projects, and to exhibit strong communication skills in the delivery of their findings.

Specialism in Religion and Peace-building 15
Optional Modules
  • Placement for Development, Religion and Peacebuilding
  • Christianity, Race and Colonialism
  • Aspects of Islam
  • Hinduism and Modernity
  • Buddhism: Traditions and Transformations
  • Judaism in the Contemporary World
  • Indigenous Religions
  • New and Alternative Religions
  • Religion, Ethics, and War
  • The Church and Politics
  • Advanced Field Studies
  • Politics, Energy and the Environment
  • Sexual Violence and Politics: A Political, Historical and Cultural Investigation
  • Global South: Politics, Inequality and (In)Security
  • Contemporary Civil War

Optional Credits

Dissertation 30

In conversation with a member of academic staff, students select an appropriate area of investigation. In 8-10,000 words, students must engage with their chosen topic using critical methodologies, evidence and argument. The topic chosen must be one which relates to the subject matter of their Programme and which permits the demonstration of independent research, study and reflection.

Specialism in Religion and Development 15

The module provides an in-depth exploration of a particular topic or area in the study of development, peacebuilding and religion in line with the research expertise and published outputs (realised or potential) of teaching staff. The main debates, controversies and problems will be considered and methodologies examined. Independent study on the part of the students to explore particular themes, texts, figures, or areas around the subject, which will be based in contemporary scholarly resources, is a key component. Students will be required to take initiative on devising their assessment projects, and to exhibit strong communication skills in the delivery of their findings.

Specialism in Religion and Peace-building 15
Optional Modules
  • Placement for Development, Religion and Peacebuilding
  • Christianity, Race and Colonialism
  • Aspects of Islam
  • Hinduism and Modernity
  • Buddhism: Traditions and Transformations
  • Judaism in the Contemporary World
  • Indigenous Religions
  • New and Alternative Religions
  • Religion, Ethics, and War
  • The Church and Politics
  • Advanced Field Studies
  • Politics, Energy and the Environment
  • Sexual Violence and Politics: A Political, Historical and Cultural Investigation
  • Global South: Politics, Inequality and (In)Security
  • Contemporary Civil War

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2020 Course Tuition Fees

 UK/EU

International

Year 1 £9,250 £13,500
Year 2 £9,250 £13,500
Year 3 £9,250 £13,500
Total £27,750 £40,500
Optional Sandwich Year £700 £700
Total with Sandwich Year £28,450 £41,200

If you are a UK or EU student starting your degree in September 2020, the first year will cost you £9,250*. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK and EU students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK/EU Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £112.50 and a 15 credit module is £1,687.

*The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year. 

ADDITIONAL COSTS

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course.

Mandatory

Printing and Binding

We are proud to offer free printing for all students to ensure that printing costs are not a potential financial barrier to student success. The University of Winchester and Winchester Student Union are champions of sustainability and therefore ask that all students consider the environment and print fairly. Students may be required to pay for the costs of dissertation binding. Indicative cost is £1.50-£3.

Optional

Core texts

Core Texts are available from the University Library; however, students will be strongly encouraged in some modules to purchase a copy of a key work that the module focuses on. Some Core Texts can be bought second hand, or as an ebook which can often reduce this cost. Indicative cost: £100 per academic year.

Study abroad

Students have the option to study a semester abroad in the USA in their second year of study. For more information visit our Study Abroad page.

Field trips

In year 2 and/or year 3, students may undertake field studies to explore the diversity of religions, cultures and traditions - previous trips have included India, Istanbul and Jerusalem. The cost of a field trip is dependent on location and duration. Indicative cost: £800 - £1200.

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards.

Key course details

UCAS code
V690
Duration
3 years full-time
Typical offer
104-120 points
Location
On campus, Winchester