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COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Study key aspects of law in a city that has been central to the English legal system for at least 1,000 years
  • Learn real-world professional skills from practical assessments such as mooting and negotiation
  • Gain an impressive range of other transferable skills that will prepare you for future employment in both legal and non-legal working environments
  • Benefit from small numbers in tutorials, which allow for rewarding discussions and debates and closer interaction with our expert staff
  • Develop as a critical thinker and master the art of how to communicate clearly and creatively
  • Use the Work Placement module to gain experience in an organisation relevant to your career aspirations
  • Access outstanding industry-standard facilities in our Multimedia Centre, including two HD TV studios with green screens, a newsroom, and a computerised radio studio

Law continues to provide the framework for modern society, impacting on all our lives. While for most of us, media is at the centre of our daily experience and the ways in which we communicate with each other. These two areas overlap and form part of our private and public worlds. 

As a Law with Media and Communication student at Winchester you engage with these subjects in a practical, dynamic fashion, exploring the relationships between them and seeking to understand how they interact. You will develop legal knowledge and practical professional skills alongside an applied examination of modern media concepts and legal principles.

Studying for a law-based degree with us is an intellectually stimulating and thought-provoking experience. The programme encourages you to develop an enquiring and critical attitude to law, and you learn to think logically and communicate clearly. You become proficient in vital legal skills such as legal research, negotiation and mooting – presenting a legal argument to defeat an opponent in court. Mooting brings law alive and you may find yourself discussing a wide range of topics from discrimination in the workplace to third-party rights when downloading music from the internet. 

Taught by research-active experts who form part of a strong and lively community of students and staff, you develop a strong understanding of the media industries and trends in media culture and communication and have access to our state-of-the-art multimedia facilities.

Year 1 gives you a solid grounding in Legal Systems and Method, Law of Torts and Public Law as well as Media Law and Media in the 21st Century. 

In Year 2, you study Criminal Law - Principles and Personal Offences and Criminal Law - Property Related Offences.

Your final year features a compulsory module in Media Law Update. You also produce a dissertation on a topic of your choice, subject to approval from tutors expert in the field. 

Throughout Years 2 and 3 you can choose from a wide range of optional modules available for you to explore your special interests. These may include Technology and Cyber Law, Sport and the Law, Penology and Prison Law, Human Rights, or family, medical or property law.

Your programme will comprise 75% of the modules from the Law programme and 25% from the Media and Communication programme.

Careers

As well as a flexible qualification with a solid foundation in law, graduates leave Winchester armed with a key set of transferable skills. They go on to work in a wide range of careers in both the public and private sectors, professional services, businesses, journalism, media, film and sport.

Pre-approved for a Masters

University of Winchester students studying Bachelor Honours degrees are pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible students must apply by the end of March in their final year and meet the entry requirements of their chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applications from:

UK, EU, World

Work placements

You have the opportunity to undertake professional practice placements during the programme for three months, six months or one year. Three or six month placements can be taken as part of credit bearing modules, allowing you to undertake a work placement and still graduate within three years.

Learning and teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market.                      

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc.), you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 1 (Level 4): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 264 hours
  • Independent learning: 936 hours
Year 2 (Level 5): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 240 hours
  • Independent learning: 948 hours
  • Placement: 12 hours
Year 3 (Level 6): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 240 hours
  • Independent learning: 960 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course. 

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester.

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 1 (Level 4)*:
  • 25% coursework
  • 50% written exams
  • 25% practical exams
Year 2 (Level 5)*:
  • 73% coursework
  • 5% written exams
  • 22% practical exams
Year 3 (Level 6)*:
  • 78% coursework
  • 3% written exams
  • 19% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2021 Entry: 104-120 points

A GCSE A*-C or 9-4 pass in English Language is required.

International Baccalaureate: 104-120 points to include a minimum of 2 Higher level IB certificates at grade 4 or above.

If English is not your first language: Year 1/Level 4: IELTS 5.5 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in all four components.

Course Enquiries and Applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234

Send us a message

International Students

International students seeking additional information about this programme can send an email to International@winchester.ac.uk or call +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Days

Year 1 (Level 4)

Modules Credits

The English Legal System and Academic Legal Skills 15

This module introduces students to the structure and operation of the institutions and processes of the English legal system. It will consider at the primary and secondary sources of English law and how the law is interpreted. In addition, the module will allow students to develop a theoretical understanding of a number of foundation academic legal skills used in the study and practice of law.

Introduction to English Legal Process and Practical Legal Skills 15

This module introduces students to the civil and criminal justice systems in England and Wales. Students will gain an insight into the role of judges, the legal professions and lay participation in the legal system. In addition, the module will allow students to develop a theoretical understanding of a number of foundation practical legal skills used in the study and practice of law.

Introduction to Public Law 15

This module explores core issues relating to the UK constitution, such as the role of parliament and the monarchy within a parliamentary democracy. We will examine the balance of power between parliament and the courts, as well as the powers of government and its limitations. The module introduces students to the legal and political sources of the British constitution, the relationship of the State towards its citizens and to other States, and to the scope of the courts to review government action. 

Public Law: Judicial Review and Human Rights 15

This module continues to explore the constitutional role of the courts in examining the actions of government, as well as the steps a petitioner must take when asking a court review the legality of government action. We will examine the legal analysis used by the courts in the process of judicial review of the government. This module will encourage you to examine the individual human rights afforded to citizens, as well as the protections provided by the common law.

Foundations of the Law of Tort 15

A ‘tort’ is a civil wrong against protected interests such as the physical integrity of the person, land and property, reputation and economic interests. This module introduces some foundations of the of torts. It considers key principles of selected torts and considers their historical development. This module will examine the interactions between law and public policy, as well as the social and philosophical foundations of the law of torts more broadly.

Further Principles of Tort 15

This module follows on from the Foundations of the Law of Torts module and aims to further develop the knowledge and skills already gained.  This module studies a range of different torts, each varying in nature and possessing unique complexity. This could include those relating to physical integrity of the person, land and property, reputation and economic interests.  The key principles of various selected torts and their historical development are explored including reflections on the social and public policy implications, as well as the philosophical or social foundations of each tort studied.

Media Law 15

The media law module covers the basic curriculum of practical legal knowledge required by professional journalists. Topics covered include libel, contempt of court, copyright, and privacy. The module also covers the regulatory framework in which UK journalism, emphasising practical application through field trips to courts and the local authorities.

Understanding New Media 15

This module builds on the key concepts and theories introduced in Introduction to Media, Culture and Society in semester one and uses them to explore some of the most pertinent issues of media in the contemporary digital landscape, including the uses and abuses of new media, ideas about politics and citizenship, new media and identity, and security, surveillance and safety. One of the key threads of this module will be to encourage self-reflection about how individuals engage with new media and the implications of this practice on everyday life, including new media’s overdetermined construction of our social realities.

Year 2 (Level 5)

Modules Credits

Criminal Law - Principles and Personal Offences 15

The criminal law provides citizens with a framework set of rules for conducting day to day activities. Under the criminal law, those people who have been found to fail to comply to these rules are punished. The state – through legislation and common law – uses its power to uphold these rules and award punishments to those who offend. The criminal law covers a wide range of behaviours that vary in severity and regularity. This module focuses on the fundamental principles of criminal law. It explores key offences against the person, including non-fatal offences against the person, homicide, and sexual offences, and examines legal and moral issues relating to these offences.

Criminal Law - Property Related Offences 15

The criminal law provides citizens with a framework set of rules for conducting day to day activities. Under the criminal law, those people who have been found to fail to comply to these rules are punished. The state – through legislation and common law – uses its power to uphold these rules and award punishments to those who offend. The criminal law covers a wide range of behaviours that vary in severity and regularity. This module focuses on the fundamental principles of criminal law. It also explores key offences against property, including theft, criminal damage, burglary, robbery and fraud, and examines legal and moral issues relating to these offences.

Journalism: Digital and Social Media 15

 

This module explores the role and impact of social media in democratic and non-democratic societies and the role and impact of digital media in journalistic practices and organizations.

Optional Modules
  • Land Law - 15 credits
  • Equity and Trust Law - 15 credits
  • Company Law –The Corporate Body - 15 credits
  • Sports and the Law - 15 credits
  • Employment Law - 15 credits
  • Human Rights Law - 15 credits
  • Criminal Justice - 15 credits
  • Company Law – Corporate Governance - 15 credits
  • Equality Law - 15 credits
  • Medical Law - 15 credits
  • Evidence Law - 15 credits
  • Immigration Law and Policy - 15 credits
  • Volunteering for Law Students - 15 credits
  • Understanding Social Media - 15 credits
  • Media Campaign Management - 15 credits
  • Value Studies - 15 credits

Optional Credits

Criminal Law - Principles and Personal Offences 15

The criminal law provides citizens with a framework set of rules for conducting day to day activities. Under the criminal law, those people who have been found to fail to comply to these rules are punished. The state – through legislation and common law – uses its power to uphold these rules and award punishments to those who offend. The criminal law covers a wide range of behaviours that vary in severity and regularity. This module focuses on the fundamental principles of criminal law. It explores key offences against the person, including non-fatal offences against the person, homicide, and sexual offences, and examines legal and moral issues relating to these offences.

Criminal Law - Property Related Offences 15

The criminal law provides citizens with a framework set of rules for conducting day to day activities. Under the criminal law, those people who have been found to fail to comply to these rules are punished. The state – through legislation and common law – uses its power to uphold these rules and award punishments to those who offend. The criminal law covers a wide range of behaviours that vary in severity and regularity. This module focuses on the fundamental principles of criminal law. It also explores key offences against property, including theft, criminal damage, burglary, robbery and fraud, and examines legal and moral issues relating to these offences.

Journalism: Digital and Social Media 15

 

This module explores the role and impact of social media in democratic and non-democratic societies and the role and impact of digital media in journalistic practices and organizations.

Optional Modules
  • Land Law - 15 credits
  • Equity and Trust Law - 15 credits
  • Company Law –The Corporate Body - 15 credits
  • Sports and the Law - 15 credits
  • Employment Law - 15 credits
  • Human Rights Law - 15 credits
  • Criminal Justice - 15 credits
  • Company Law – Corporate Governance - 15 credits
  • Equality Law - 15 credits
  • Medical Law - 15 credits
  • Evidence Law - 15 credits
  • Immigration Law and Policy - 15 credits
  • Volunteering for Law Students - 15 credits
  • Understanding Social Media - 15 credits
  • Media Campaign Management - 15 credits
  • Value Studies - 15 credits

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

Dissertation 30

Students will need to choose either Dissertation OR Independent Research Project

 

The Law Dissertation module provides students with an opportunity to research an area of law which is of particular interest. Students will be assigned supervisor who will help to guide and support them as they focus their research question on a specific area of law.

Students are expected to meet with their supervisor and work with them to formulate a working title and structure, with a view to producing a coherent and detailed dissertation which critically analyses a particular legal issue. This will require researching a range of primary and/or secondary legal sources and materials in order to engage with the required depth of analysis and evaluation.

Independent Research Project 15

Students will need to choose either Dissertation OR Independent Research Project

 

The Independent Research Project module provides students with an opportunity to undertake an independent study, with the support of an assigned supervisor. This will facilitate the in-depth critical analysis of an area of law which is of interest to the student.

Students are expected to meet with their supervisor and work with them to formulate a working title and structure, with a view to producing a coherent research project on a particular legal issue. This will require engaging in a critical analysis of primary and/or secondary legal sources and materials.

Media Law Update 15

This module supplements the study of principles and statutes developed at Level Four with the analysis of current cases and recent precedents both in the courts and in the findings of key regulatory bodies Such as OFCOM. It will provide you with the skills to continually update your knowledge throughout your career through the examination of cases in this rapidly changing field.

Optional Modules
  • Employment Law - 15 credits
  • Company Law – The Corporate Body - 15 credits
  • Human Rights Law - 15 credits
  • Sports and the Law - 15 credits
  • Company Law – Corporate Governance - 15 credits
  • Equality Law - 15 credits
  • Criminal Justice -15 credits
  • Evidence Law -15 credits
  • Medical Law -15 credits
  • Immigration Law and Policy -15 credits
  • Intellectual Property Law -15 credits
  • Technology and Cyber Law -15 credits
  • European Union Law -15 credits
  • Mental Health Law -15 credits
  • Family Law -15 credits
  • Advocacy -15 credits
  • Child Law and Policy -15 credits
  • Current Legislative Problems -15 credits
  • Philosophy of Law -15 credits
  • Employment Law in the Workplace -15 credits
  • European and International Labour Law -15 credits
  • Environmental Law and Policy -15 credits
  • International Criminal Law -15 credits
  • Advanced Equity and Trusts Law -15 credits
  • Working in Digital Journalism -15 credits
  • Community Media -15 credits
  • Dark Side of the Net -15 credits
  • Value Studies -15 credits

Optional Credits

Dissertation 30

Students will need to choose either Dissertation OR Independent Research Project

 

The Law Dissertation module provides students with an opportunity to research an area of law which is of particular interest. Students will be assigned supervisor who will help to guide and support them as they focus their research question on a specific area of law.

Students are expected to meet with their supervisor and work with them to formulate a working title and structure, with a view to producing a coherent and detailed dissertation which critically analyses a particular legal issue. This will require researching a range of primary and/or secondary legal sources and materials in order to engage with the required depth of analysis and evaluation.

Independent Research Project 15

Students will need to choose either Dissertation OR Independent Research Project

 

The Independent Research Project module provides students with an opportunity to undertake an independent study, with the support of an assigned supervisor. This will facilitate the in-depth critical analysis of an area of law which is of interest to the student.

Students are expected to meet with their supervisor and work with them to formulate a working title and structure, with a view to producing a coherent research project on a particular legal issue. This will require engaging in a critical analysis of primary and/or secondary legal sources and materials.

Media Law Update 15

This module supplements the study of principles and statutes developed at Level Four with the analysis of current cases and recent precedents both in the courts and in the findings of key regulatory bodies Such as OFCOM. It will provide you with the skills to continually update your knowledge throughout your career through the examination of cases in this rapidly changing field.

Optional Modules
  • Employment Law - 15 credits
  • Company Law – The Corporate Body - 15 credits
  • Human Rights Law - 15 credits
  • Sports and the Law - 15 credits
  • Company Law – Corporate Governance - 15 credits
  • Equality Law - 15 credits
  • Criminal Justice -15 credits
  • Evidence Law -15 credits
  • Medical Law -15 credits
  • Immigration Law and Policy -15 credits
  • Intellectual Property Law -15 credits
  • Technology and Cyber Law -15 credits
  • European Union Law -15 credits
  • Mental Health Law -15 credits
  • Family Law -15 credits
  • Advocacy -15 credits
  • Child Law and Policy -15 credits
  • Current Legislative Problems -15 credits
  • Philosophy of Law -15 credits
  • Employment Law in the Workplace -15 credits
  • European and International Labour Law -15 credits
  • Environmental Law and Policy -15 credits
  • International Criminal Law -15 credits
  • Advanced Equity and Trusts Law -15 credits
  • Working in Digital Journalism -15 credits
  • Community Media -15 credits
  • Dark Side of the Net -15 credits
  • Value Studies -15 credits

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2021 Course Tuition Fees

 UK / Channel Islands /
Isle of Man / Republic of Ireland 

International

Year 1 £9,250 £13,800
Year 2 £9,250 £13,800
Year 3 £9,250 £13,800
Total £27,750 £41,400
Optional Sandwich Year* £1,385 £1,385
Total with Sandwich Year £29,135 £42,785

If you are a UK student starting your degree in September 2021, the first year will cost you £9,250**. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £115 and a 15 credit module is £1,725.

* Please note that not all courses offer an optional sandwich year. To find out whether this course offers a sandwich year, please contact the programme leader for further information.

**The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year.

Additional Costs

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Mandatory

Printing and Binding

The University is pleased to offer our students a free printing allowance of £20 each academic year. This will print around 500 A4 mono pages. If students wish to print more, printer credit can be topped up by the student. The University and Student Union are champions of sustainability and we ask all our students to consider the environmental impact before printing. Our Reprographics team also offer printing and binding services, including dissertation binding which may be required by your course with an indicative cost of £1.50-£3.

Course specific bursaries/scholarships

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards page.

Key course details

UCAS code
M290
Duration
3 years full-time; 6 years part-time
Typical offer
104-120 points
Location
On campus, Winchester