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COURSE OVERVIEW

*Subject to revalidation

  • Examine theological arguments, ancient texts and ethical controversies and see how they link to current issues
  • Develop your skills as a writer, debater, and thinker
  • Learn from staff who are comfortable with big questions and know how to make their subject interesting
  • Enjoy opportunities to specialise in your own areas of interest

Our Theology programme deals with big questions of human existence. Why do we exist? Can we prove the existence of God? What is the role of religion in the contemporary world? How should we treat each other?

You will examine traditional Christianity in the modern world, paying equal attention to its roots, its formation and culture, and its role in modern society. You will study the background of the Bible (especially the New Testament), through the analysis of the texts and also through an exploration of their cultural, philosophical and historical context.

On our BA (Hons) Theology programme you will also study how Christian thought emerged from its Biblical context, how it encountered the Greek philosophical tradition, and how it gradually developed its own theological and philosophical language, both in the age of the Fathers and today.

You will also study the political and cultural context of the development of Christianity, which will allow you to understand the nuances and the difficulties in the formulation of the Church in different parts of the world.

Finally, you will study the place Christianity occupies in the modern world, the challenges it faces, and the ethical, philosophical and political dialogues it engages with.

Whether you wish to study Christianity from a position of faith, or whether you prefer to study it from a critical perspective, this programme will allow you to do so. We commit both to solid scholarship and to a deep examination of Christianity as an experience and a way of life, as a revelation, and as an exploration of the spiritual nature of the human being.

Some of our students arrive with destinations in mind, but others discover their vocation while they’re here. Graduates commonly find work as teachers, journalists, social workers and academics, or in the charity sector.

Wherever you’re heading, we want to help you reach there. A degree that addresses what it means to reason, to be, to act, to believe, to read – we think that’s a good place to start.

Careers

Graduates enter a wide range of careers in such areas teaching (philosophy, religion or ethics), charity/Non-Governmental Organisation work, and employment in the public and private sectors.

94% of our 2016/17 graduates (first degree and other undergraduate courses) were in employment and/or further study six months after completing their course (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey).

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degree with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

*Subject to revalidation

This course is subject to revalidation. 'Revalidation' is the process by which the University refreshes its existing provision. Revalidation assesses the quality and standards of the programme to ensure it continues to provide a distinct, high quality academic experience for students, enabling them to acquire the necessary academic knowledge, understanding, general and subject-specific skills required to pursue a graduate level career.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Study abroad

Our Theology course provides an opportunity for you to study abroad in the USA

For more information see our Study Abroad section.

Learning and teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market.

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc.), you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Theology, Religion and Ethics teaching is very student-centred and you are unlikely to be lectured at. We teach in small, informal, specialist classes which ensure you're always a name and never a number. Our teaching is dynamic and interactive, fuelled by reading, discussion and presentations, or through interaction with visual media and the arts. We'll run group exercises, help you get started on individual projects, and guide you along the way with your assessments.

Year 1 (Level 4)*:
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 192 hours
  • Independent learning: 1008 hours
Year 2 (Level 5)*:
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 180 hours
  • Independent learning: 1008 hours
  • Placement: 12 hours
Year 3 (Level 6)*:
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 192 hours
  • Independent learning: 996 hours
  • Placement: 12 hours

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

YEAR 1 (LEVEL 4)*:

87% coursework
0% written exams
13% practical exams

YEAR 2 (LEVEL 5)*:

90% coursework
0% written exams
10% practical exams

YEAR 3 (LEVEL 6)*:

84% coursework
0% written exams
16% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures

 

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2020 Entry: 104-120 points

A GCSE A*-C or 9-4 pass in English Language is required.

International Baccalaureate: 104-120 points to include a minimum of 2 Higher level IB certificates at grade 4 or above.

If English is not your first language: IELTS 6.0 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in writing or equivalent

Course Enquiries and Applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234
Send us a message

International Students

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by emailing our International Recruitment Team at International@winchester.ac.uk or calling +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester

Year 1 (Level 4)

Modules Credits

Joining the Conversation 15

In this module we will focus on a key debate, topic or dilemma in the Christian tradition to collectively develop your academic skills. These skills will include textual analysis, research, note taking and academic writing. This module will show how lectures, reading and independent work might be utilised for effective written assessment. Students will be trained to read primary and secondary texts, and work within the parameters of Higher Education with increased confidence. Important topics for your success at university such as what constitutes good essay structure, understanding assessment criteria and how your work is marks, along with how to reference texts and avoid committing plagiarism will be introduced through this module.

Ethics and Religion 15

This module is designed to provide a thorough grounding in the academic study of ethics. Students will explore a range of current moral issues and debates in some or all of the following areas: science, technology and medicine; animals and ecological concern; gender, sexuality and intimate relationships; political, economic and social life. They will develop skills in analysing such debates through the study of selected philosophical, theological and/or religious approaches to moral reasoning. The module will give students an opportunity to develop a critical understanding of key historical and contemporary thinkers and traditions in ethics, and will explore some of the ways in which philosophical, theological and religious forms of moral reasoning have interacted in different times and places.

Global Christianities 15

Christianity is amongst the world’s most widely spread religions, but it is far from uniform in its regional variations. This module is designed to give an appreciation of the forms and variety of Christianity beyond the terrain of the Western world. The module will look at the split between the Western and Eastern Churches, but also the split between Northern and Southern forms of Christianity and the limits of these labels. Movements such as Pentecostalism will be explained and students will engage with Missiology and consider how it has been critiqued in post-colonial studies and whether these criticisms are entirely fair.

Understanding Christianity 15

This module seeks to give students a knowledge of the underlying ideas behind the globally multifaceted Christian tradition: including its historical development, fundamental beliefs, central practices and divergent understandings of Jesus. The course will explore how religion and belief emerge and how Christianity is an historical phenomenon with certain key beliefs and practices that evolve over time. We will discover how the texts of the Bible took on their present form and how Christianity exists as a set of multiple contested interpretations of central truths that face challenges in today’s post-secular world that were undreamt of 2000 years ago.

God, Soul and World in Early-Modern Thought 15

The Early-Modern period: a time when parts of Classical thought were being rejected while others were being rediscovered. We will look at how a renewed focus on epistemology along with developments in the natural sciences led to a new confidence in the power of reason against superstition and illusion. To develop our skills and knowledge of the diverging rationalist and empiricist traditions that succeeded medieval scholasticism, we will focus in particular on the conceptual accounts and proofs of the existence of God, Soul and World that developed in the succession of debates sparked by Descartes. By investigating their proofs for the existence of God, the immortal soul and the reality of the external world, their explanations for the existence of evil and their accounts of freedom, we will learn to analyse texts carefully and form persuasive arguments with and against them.

Introduction to Biblical Studies 15

The Bible is a central text in various religious communities and remains an important cultural driver in wider society. This module introduces students to the study of the Bible by looking at some key books and key intellectual controversies around their interpretation. Students will be introduced to the diversity of the Bible and its accompanying scholarship and will be encouraged to engage with a variety of questions around both their historical and literary dimensions. The module will invite students to appreciate the many, diverse ways in which meaning can be gathered from biblical texts. How the Bible has been and is read in different contexts and with respect to culture will also be important. Specific texts will be looked at in detail.

Great Christian Thinkers 15

The Christian doctrinal tradition has been the scene of immense intellectual energy and creativity for two thousand years. This module introduces some of its most influential figures, situating them within their historical context and exploring some of the central themes in their thought. Theologians to be included will normally include figures such as Catherine of Siena, Aquinas, Luther, Schleiermacher and Gutiérrez.

Optional
  • Contemporary Conversations - 15 Credits
  • The Meaning of Life on Film - 15 Credits

Optional Credits

Joining the Conversation 15

In this module we will focus on a key debate, topic or dilemma in the Christian tradition to collectively develop your academic skills. These skills will include textual analysis, research, note taking and academic writing. This module will show how lectures, reading and independent work might be utilised for effective written assessment. Students will be trained to read primary and secondary texts, and work within the parameters of Higher Education with increased confidence. Important topics for your success at university such as what constitutes good essay structure, understanding assessment criteria and how your work is marks, along with how to reference texts and avoid committing plagiarism will be introduced through this module.

Ethics and Religion 15

This module is designed to provide a thorough grounding in the academic study of ethics. Students will explore a range of current moral issues and debates in some or all of the following areas: science, technology and medicine; animals and ecological concern; gender, sexuality and intimate relationships; political, economic and social life. They will develop skills in analysing such debates through the study of selected philosophical, theological and/or religious approaches to moral reasoning. The module will give students an opportunity to develop a critical understanding of key historical and contemporary thinkers and traditions in ethics, and will explore some of the ways in which philosophical, theological and religious forms of moral reasoning have interacted in different times and places.

Global Christianities 15

Christianity is amongst the world’s most widely spread religions, but it is far from uniform in its regional variations. This module is designed to give an appreciation of the forms and variety of Christianity beyond the terrain of the Western world. The module will look at the split between the Western and Eastern Churches, but also the split between Northern and Southern forms of Christianity and the limits of these labels. Movements such as Pentecostalism will be explained and students will engage with Missiology and consider how it has been critiqued in post-colonial studies and whether these criticisms are entirely fair.

Understanding Christianity 15

This module seeks to give students a knowledge of the underlying ideas behind the globally multifaceted Christian tradition: including its historical development, fundamental beliefs, central practices and divergent understandings of Jesus. The course will explore how religion and belief emerge and how Christianity is an historical phenomenon with certain key beliefs and practices that evolve over time. We will discover how the texts of the Bible took on their present form and how Christianity exists as a set of multiple contested interpretations of central truths that face challenges in today’s post-secular world that were undreamt of 2000 years ago.

God, Soul and World in Early-Modern Thought 15

The Early-Modern period: a time when parts of Classical thought were being rejected while others were being rediscovered. We will look at how a renewed focus on epistemology along with developments in the natural sciences led to a new confidence in the power of reason against superstition and illusion. To develop our skills and knowledge of the diverging rationalist and empiricist traditions that succeeded medieval scholasticism, we will focus in particular on the conceptual accounts and proofs of the existence of God, Soul and World that developed in the succession of debates sparked by Descartes. By investigating their proofs for the existence of God, the immortal soul and the reality of the external world, their explanations for the existence of evil and their accounts of freedom, we will learn to analyse texts carefully and form persuasive arguments with and against them.

Introduction to Biblical Studies 15

The Bible is a central text in various religious communities and remains an important cultural driver in wider society. This module introduces students to the study of the Bible by looking at some key books and key intellectual controversies around their interpretation. Students will be introduced to the diversity of the Bible and its accompanying scholarship and will be encouraged to engage with a variety of questions around both their historical and literary dimensions. The module will invite students to appreciate the many, diverse ways in which meaning can be gathered from biblical texts. How the Bible has been and is read in different contexts and with respect to culture will also be important. Specific texts will be looked at in detail.

Great Christian Thinkers 15

The Christian doctrinal tradition has been the scene of immense intellectual energy and creativity for two thousand years. This module introduces some of its most influential figures, situating them within their historical context and exploring some of the central themes in their thought. Theologians to be included will normally include figures such as Catherine of Siena, Aquinas, Luther, Schleiermacher and Gutiérrez.

Optional
  • Contemporary Conversations - 15 Credits
  • The Meaning of Life on Film - 15 Credits

Year 2 (Level 5)

Modules Credits

Thinking with the Earth 15

This module will explore a range of religious, theological and/or philosophical approaches to understanding and engaging with questions of ecology and environmental sustainability. The first half of the module will focus on introducing key ideas and approaches from a range of traditions and the second half of the module will help students to develop and pursue their own research project, engaging in detail with a specific line of inquiry relating to the overall module theme.

Research Methods 15

This module is designed to help students reflect on the nature of their chosen discipline(s), to identify particular methods and skills relevant to their disciple from a wide range of methods and skills, and to develop those skills in order to produce a research proposal.

Optional Modules
  • Aesthetics - 15 credits
  • Ancient Languages: New Testament and Greek - 15 credits
  • Ancient Languages: Old Testament and Hebrew - 15 credits
  • Angels and Demons - 15 credits
  • Bioethics - 15 credits
  • Christianity, Race and Colonialism - 15 credits
  • Contemporary Christian Theology - 15 credits
  • Early Christian Spirituality and Neoplatonism - 15 credits
  • Gender, Sexuality and the Bible - 15 credits
  • Gospel Study - 15 credits
  • Intrigues, Doctrines and Heresies: The Early Church Councils - 15 credits
  • Nietzsche, Freud and Atheism - 15 credits
  • Orthodox Christianity - 15 credits
  • Political Theology - 15 credits
  • Radical Christian Texts - 15 credits
  • Religion, Ethics and War - 15 credits
  • Science and Religion - 15 credits
  • The Church and Politics - 15 credits
  • Volunteering for Theology, Religion and Philosophy - 15 credits

Optional Credits

Thinking with the Earth 15

This module will explore a range of religious, theological and/or philosophical approaches to understanding and engaging with questions of ecology and environmental sustainability. The first half of the module will focus on introducing key ideas and approaches from a range of traditions and the second half of the module will help students to develop and pursue their own research project, engaging in detail with a specific line of inquiry relating to the overall module theme.

Research Methods 15

This module is designed to help students reflect on the nature of their chosen discipline(s), to identify particular methods and skills relevant to their disciple from a wide range of methods and skills, and to develop those skills in order to produce a research proposal.

Optional Modules
  • Aesthetics - 15 credits
  • Ancient Languages: New Testament and Greek - 15 credits
  • Ancient Languages: Old Testament and Hebrew - 15 credits
  • Angels and Demons - 15 credits
  • Bioethics - 15 credits
  • Christianity, Race and Colonialism - 15 credits
  • Contemporary Christian Theology - 15 credits
  • Early Christian Spirituality and Neoplatonism - 15 credits
  • Gender, Sexuality and the Bible - 15 credits
  • Gospel Study - 15 credits
  • Intrigues, Doctrines and Heresies: The Early Church Councils - 15 credits
  • Nietzsche, Freud and Atheism - 15 credits
  • Orthodox Christianity - 15 credits
  • Political Theology - 15 credits
  • Radical Christian Texts - 15 credits
  • Religion, Ethics and War - 15 credits
  • Science and Religion - 15 credits
  • The Church and Politics - 15 credits
  • Volunteering for Theology, Religion and Philosophy - 15 credits

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

Dissertation 30

In conversation with a member of academic staff, students select an appropriate area of investigation. In 8-10,000 words, students must engage with their chosen topic using critical methodologies, evidence and argument. The topic chosen must be one which relates to the subject matter of their programme and which permits the demonstration of independent research, study and reflection.

Optional Modules
  • Aesthetics - 15 Credits
  • Ancient Languages: New Testament and Greek - 15 Credits
  • Ancient Languages: Old Testament and Hebrew - 15 Credits
  • Angels and Demons - 15 Credits
  • Bioethics - 15 Credits
  • Christianity, Race and Colonialism - 15 Credits
  • Contemporary Christian Theology - 15 Credits
  • Early Christian Spirituality and Neoplatonism - 15 Credits
  • Gender, Sexuality and the Bible - 15 Credits
  • Gospel Study - 15 Credits
  • Intrigues, Doctrines and Heresies: The Early Church Councils - 15 Credits
  • Orthodox Christianity - 15 Credits
  • Political Theology - 15 Credits
  • Radical Christian Texts - 15 Credits
  • Religion, Ethics and War - 15 Credits
  • Science and Religion - 15 Credits
  • Senior Seminar - 15 Credits
  • The Church and Politics - 15 Credits
  • Volunteering for Theology, Religion and Philosophy - 15 Credits

Optional Credits

Dissertation 30

In conversation with a member of academic staff, students select an appropriate area of investigation. In 8-10,000 words, students must engage with their chosen topic using critical methodologies, evidence and argument. The topic chosen must be one which relates to the subject matter of their programme and which permits the demonstration of independent research, study and reflection.

Optional Modules
  • Aesthetics - 15 Credits
  • Ancient Languages: New Testament and Greek - 15 Credits
  • Ancient Languages: Old Testament and Hebrew - 15 Credits
  • Angels and Demons - 15 Credits
  • Bioethics - 15 Credits
  • Christianity, Race and Colonialism - 15 Credits
  • Contemporary Christian Theology - 15 Credits
  • Early Christian Spirituality and Neoplatonism - 15 Credits
  • Gender, Sexuality and the Bible - 15 Credits
  • Gospel Study - 15 Credits
  • Intrigues, Doctrines and Heresies: The Early Church Councils - 15 Credits
  • Orthodox Christianity - 15 Credits
  • Political Theology - 15 Credits
  • Radical Christian Texts - 15 Credits
  • Religion, Ethics and War - 15 Credits
  • Science and Religion - 15 Credits
  • Senior Seminar - 15 Credits
  • The Church and Politics - 15 Credits
  • Volunteering for Theology, Religion and Philosophy - 15 Credits

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2020 Course Tuition Fees

 UK/EU

International

Year 1 £9,250 £13,500
Year 2 £9,250 £13,500
Year 3 £9,250 £13,500
Total £27,750 £40,500
Optional Sandwich Year £700 £700
Total with Sandwich Year £28,450 £41,200

If you are a UK or EU student starting your degree in September 2020, the first year will cost you £9,250*. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK and EU students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK/EU Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £112.50 and a 15 credit module is £1,687.

*The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year. 

ADDITIONAL COSTS

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Mandatory

Printing and Binding: We are proud to offer free printing for all students to ensure that printing costs are not a potential financial barrier to student success. The University of Winchester and Winchester Student Union are champions of sustainability and therefore ask that all students consider the environment and print fairly. Students may be required to pay for the costs of dissertation binding. Indicative cost is £1.50-£3.

Optional

Core texts: Core Texts are available from the University Library; however, students will be strongly encouraged in some modules to purchase a copy of a key work that the module focuses on. Some Core Texts can be bought second hand, or as an ebook which can often reduce this cost. Indicative cost is £100 per academic year.

Field trips: In year 2 and/or year 3, students may undertake field studies to explore the diversity of religions, cultures and traditions - previous trips have included India, Istanbul and Jerusalem. The cost of a field trip is dependent on location and duration. Previous trip costs have ranged between £800 and £1200. Indicative cost £800-£1,200

Study abroad: Students have the option to study a semester abroad in the USA in their second year of study. For more information please click here

Course Specific Bursaries/ Scholarships

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards page.

Key course details

UCAS code
V610
Duration
3 years full-time; 6 years part-time
Typical offer
104-120 points
Location
On campus, Winchester