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COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Engage in and evaluate current critical debates surrounding the causes of cyber crime, forensic investigations and the methods and motivations of cyber criminals

  • Gain a specialist degree in a rapidly growing field with a current skills shortage in the marketplace

  • Benefit from a team of research-active academics and experts who work at the forefront of the field and who use interactive and practical teaching approaches to bring theory and practice to life 

  • Learn how to successfully present your evidence in written format and orally within a mock trial

  • Develop an appreciation of the wider role information security plays in an organisational context

  • Have the opportunity to complete a work placement year with a relevant organisation

  • Access a wide range of specialist software and tools including a dedicated Cyber Security and Forensics laboratory in a cutting-edge new development which houses the Department of Digital Futures and Applied Social Sciences (from September 2019)

The cyber threat to all countries, companies and organisations is significant and growing. Since the creation of the National Cyber Security Centre in February 2017, the UK has been hit by more than 200 high-level attacks. Cyber criminals seek to exploit organisations and infrastructure for profit. Their technical sophistication varies from small-scale cyber-enabled fraud to persistent, advanced and professional organisations.

Are you a computing enthusiast ready to lead the fight against cyber crime? Our dynamic Cyber Crime and Forensic Investigation degree offers a multi-disciplinary perspective on the strategic deployment and implementation of cyber security within an organisational and forensic context. The programme prepares you to recognise the threats to an organisation and master key forensic investigation methodologies to aid the detection and evidence gathering of activities relating to cyber crimes.

As a cyber security and forensic graduate you will be equipped with the latest industry recognised skills to stay one step ahead of the cyber criminals who are constantly creating new ways to bypass security measures and challenging us to find new techniques and tools for security and investigation.

Led by a specialist team of research-active academics, this industry-informed three-year degree will enhance your knowledge of various computing disciplines, including software development, networking, database analysis and design and digital forensics. Employers in this sector are seeking graduates who can demonstrate an understanding of evidence documentation processes and principles. This programme allows you to develop these skills, from crime scene to courtroom, within forensic-based modules and in the review of real case examples.

In Year 1, you are introduced to the domain of information security including, viruses, botnets, hacking and cracking, phishing and social engineering. You develop fundamental core knowledge in forensic investigation, criminal justice systems and contemporary issues as well as legal and regulatory frameworks.

In Year 2, you explore topics in the latest developments in cyber crime and forensic investigation. You are given the opportunity to apply your investigative knowledge to a range of forensic-based scenarios and to learn complementary forensic techniques.

An optional placement year allows you to enhance your employability, business understanding and professional skills through 12 months of relevant employment experience.

In Year 3, you  develop an appreciation of the legal, ethical and regulatory frameworks together with the human aspects of information security assurance and forensic investigation. The Dissertation module helps you to develop specialist skills and expertise through the undertaking of a substantial body of work. You also learn how to successfully present your evidence in written format and orally within a mock trial.

Careers

This is an exciting and dynamic degree that gives you an excellent basis for a future career in the field. As a strategic thinking graduate you will have the critical skills required to move in to specialist graduate roles such as a digital examiner within the police and broader roles such as a forensic investigator.

Equipped with a wide range of technical computing knowledge and strong logical skills, you will also be able to pursue a variety of employment opportunities within criminal justice agencies, local government, businesses and charities as well as an increasing number of private and public industries.

94% of our 2016/17 graduates (first degree and other undergraduate courses) were in employment and/or further study six months after completing their course (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey).

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degree with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for Applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Work placement:

Students can undertake an optional 12 month sandwich placement following successful completion at Level 5. BS3958 - Employment Experience offers students the opportunity to undertake meaningful and relevant employment experience (underpinned by the UoW Employer Engagement Strategy 2017).

Learning and teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market.

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc., you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

YEAR 1 (LEVEL 4): TIMETABLED TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITY*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 264 hours
Independent learning: 936 hours

YEAR 2 (LEVEL 5): TIMETABLED TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITY*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 312 hours
Independent learning: 876 hours
Placement hours: 12 hours

YEAR 3 (LEVEL 6): TIMETABLED TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITY*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 252 hours
Independent learning: 948 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course.

Location:

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester.

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

YEAR 1 (LEVEL 4)*:
  • 75% coursework
  • 25% written exams
  • 0% practical exams
YEAR 2 (LEVEL 5)*:
  • 73% coursework
  • 18% written exams
  • 9% practical exams
YEAR 3 (LEVEL 6)*:
  • 82% coursework
  • 0% written exams
  • 18% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2020 Entry: 104-112 points
2021 Entry: 104-112 points

A GCSE A*-C or 9-4 pass in Mathematics and English Language is required.

International Baccalaureate: 104-112 points to include a minimum of 2 Higher level IB certificates at grade 4 or above.

If English is not your first language: IELTS 6.0 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in writing or equivalent

Course enquiries and applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234
Send us a message

International students

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by emailing our International Recruitment Team at International@winchester.ac.uk or calling +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Days.

Year 1 (Level 4)

Modules Credits

Academic and Employment Skills 15

This module will introduce students to important academic conventions, provide coverage of basic scientific concepts that will underpin work they do throughout the programme and to encourage students to think about how they can get the most from their time at university and beyond. Students will prepare a portfolio of exercises including critical thinking, personal development and CV writing. The portfolio is designed to help students identify and meet their learning needs relating to a range of key learning skills necessary for successful study at higher education level.  During this module students will learn academic conventions associated with referencing, the importance of critical analysis of information, how to access and present Forensic Studies information and work in groups. An important part of the module are sessions dedicated to understanding scientific terms and concepts that students will need to engage with other modules. These activities and the portfolio students will develop students as independent learners and instil confidence in them going forward with the rest of their study.

Information Systems and Organisations 15

The aim of the module is to introduce the application of information, information systems and information technologies within organisations and understand the impact of such systems on organisational performance. Students will develop an understanding of the project lifecycle focussing on the importance of the customer and will look at the process involved in creating information systems by learning how to investigate and define customer requirements and understand future needs. Undertaking this module gives students an introduction to information systems and organisations, giving them the skills to work effectively within an IS organisation on projects and giving them the base for understanding other IS modules within the degree programme.

Introduction to Forensic Investigation 30

This module will introduce students to forensic science as it applies to courts of law in the UK. In addition to highlighting what constitutes ‘forensic science’ and the scope of the discipline Forensic science in both criminal and civil courts will be considered, as will the growing role of informative forensic science in private and corporate investigations.  The students will be introduced to some common types of evidence, both biological and non-biological, together with methods of recovery, packaging, preservation and analysis.

Introduction to the Criminal Justice System 15

The module introduces the Criminal Justice System, with a focus on the UK, but also in the wider context of globalisation and internationalism.  The historical context in which the modern system is based is considered, together with key developments.  The role of different interdisciplinary agencies and institutions is considered, including government, policing, social services and the court system.  The topic is considered from different perspectives – historical, legal, moral, criminological and victimological.  Key developments such as major inquiries, reviews and legislation will be discussed.  Emerging patterns and key themes of modernisation, the introduction of voluntary and private sectors, accountability and risk will also be covered.

Introduction to Cyber Security and Networks 15

The aim of this module is to introduce concepts of IT security in order to understand the security threats to an IT system and the operational impact of these threats on an organisation. The module will explore different protection methods for data and develop knowledge of security policies and procedures, including risk assessments, and how these procedures can be implemented and maintained. This module will introduce topical case studies of attacks on organisational information systems, highlighting the business consequences.

Contemporary Issues 15

The forensic science sector is constantly innovating new ways to capture new evidence types as technology advances and endeavours to meet the evolving needs of criminal justice system. This module explores a range of contemporary issues facing the forensic science sector nationally and internationally. Students are introduced to the role of the forensic science regulator and the requirement for a forensic watchdog. The module also explores the legal, ethical, academic, and political challenges the system faces as it seeks to meet public expectations.

Police and Police work 15

The police are one of the most important parts of the criminal justice system and also one of the most scrutinised. This module will introduce students to the work conducted by the police in England and Wales and focus on key debates on the role of the police with respect to the rest of society. The module will also examine and explore issues such as policing by consent, the arming of police and contemporary issues such as community policing and the policing of terrorism.  Other issues will include the policing approaches to protests and demonstrations. Challenges around police and youth groups and policing culture will be further considered.  There will also be some comparisons with police forces outside the United Kingdom. 

Year 2 (Level 5)

Modules Credits

Practical Skills for Forensic Investigation 30

This module provides opportunities for students to develop a practical skillset and it enables students to evidence their competency in several key applications in the laboratory and at the crime scene. The module places particular emphasis on enhancing transferable skills expected within graduate employment. The skills gained on this module provide an important foundation for students to apply and develop these skills further within Level 5 and at Level 6. Students will learn how to apply scientific methods to tackle problems in science, including how to construct a suitable hypothesis and how to design experiments to test this hypothesis. This module equips learner with basic scientific skills, skills specific to forensic contexts, and graduate skills as identified by prospective employers.

Secure Systems Architectures 30

This module explores protection mechanisms appropriate to various information technology systems and architectures.  Mechanisms and cryptographic protocols that help to provide confidentiality and integrity of data together with authentication and authorisation are explored in detail.  The principles and fundamentals of system-level security are considered together with a contextual overview of the law and regulations relating to the use of security mechanisms.  The practical application of these mechanisms in typical IT systems and architectures are incorporated.

Risk Management and Cyber Security 15

The aim of this module is to further develop student understanding of Information System Security.  The main focus of this module will be to explore key themes, trends and issues in cyber-security, policing and governance of the internet and business vulnerabilities.  The module provides students with an opportunity to analyse risk management, information risk assessment, risk mitigation, management standards and methodologies, implementing a risk management strategy and business continuity planning.

Optional Modules
  • Forensic Imaging - 15 Credits
  • Case Review - 20 Credits
  • Forensic DNA Evidence - 15 Credits
  • Volunteering for Forensic Studies - 15 Credits
  • Fakes and Forgeries - 15 Credits

Optional Credits

Practical Skills for Forensic Investigation 30

This module provides opportunities for students to develop a practical skillset and it enables students to evidence their competency in several key applications in the laboratory and at the crime scene. The module places particular emphasis on enhancing transferable skills expected within graduate employment. The skills gained on this module provide an important foundation for students to apply and develop these skills further within Level 5 and at Level 6. Students will learn how to apply scientific methods to tackle problems in science, including how to construct a suitable hypothesis and how to design experiments to test this hypothesis. This module equips learner with basic scientific skills, skills specific to forensic contexts, and graduate skills as identified by prospective employers.

Secure Systems Architectures 30

This module explores protection mechanisms appropriate to various information technology systems and architectures.  Mechanisms and cryptographic protocols that help to provide confidentiality and integrity of data together with authentication and authorisation are explored in detail.  The principles and fundamentals of system-level security are considered together with a contextual overview of the law and regulations relating to the use of security mechanisms.  The practical application of these mechanisms in typical IT systems and architectures are incorporated.

Risk Management and Cyber Security 15

The aim of this module is to further develop student understanding of Information System Security.  The main focus of this module will be to explore key themes, trends and issues in cyber-security, policing and governance of the internet and business vulnerabilities.  The module provides students with an opportunity to analyse risk management, information risk assessment, risk mitigation, management standards and methodologies, implementing a risk management strategy and business continuity planning.

Optional Modules
  • Forensic Imaging - 15 Credits
  • Case Review - 20 Credits
  • Forensic DNA Evidence - 15 Credits
  • Volunteering for Forensic Studies - 15 Credits
  • Fakes and Forgeries - 15 Credits

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

Cyber Crime and Forensic Investigation Dissertation 30

Following two years of study the Dissertation is an extended independent study module that provides an opportunity for students to develop further study into an area or topic of their own choice and interest, including undertaking a piece of independent research. The student will:

  • Identify a topic of interest.
  • Provide a rationale for research their chosen topic.
  • Devise and submit a research proposal.
  • Conduct the research.
  • Write up and present the project and main findings.

As part of the presentation of findings the student will prepare and present a poster outlining the research process, main findings and conclusions before addressing questions from peers and tutors. The Dissertation is a double module which spans Semesters 1 and 2 and provides the student with an opportunity to develop their interests in a specific aspect of cyber crime as well as developing their research and communication skills.

Digital Forensic Investigation 30

This module covers the four phases of digital forensic investigation including seizure, imaging, analysis and reporting.  Technical knowledge and practical skills are developed using industry standard forensic software. Legal and regulatory processes are explored in detailed together with mobile forensic techniques.

Ethics for Digital and Forensic Investigation 15
Cyber Law and Regulation of the Information Society 15

This module will examine the emerging trends that signify the formation of the information society and also its relationship with law, technology, and public policy. This module will cover UK and European Union law along with a variety of international regulatory perspectives that seek to harmonise law. The module will analyse the many legal and regulatory challenges that the information society generates for society, particularly with regard to privacy, the creation of products, the media. Particular focus will be upon whether these challenges can be best resolved by law or some other means, for example, technology, education or simple market forces.

Presenting Forensic Evidence 15

This module will enable students to appreciate the various means by which scientific evidence can be presented.  The module will cover written reports, the use of modern multi-media technology in evidence presentation, and issues regarding the presentation of evidence in the witness box.  Students will consider whether popular media may affect the public perception of expert evidence and will be given training in presentation skills. 

Year 3 Optional Modules
  • Penetration Testing - 15 Credits
  • Crime Scene Investigation - 15 Credits
  • Document Analysis - 15 Credits
  • Forensic Linguistics 15 Credits
  • Advanced Forensic Examination - 15 Credits
  • Criminological Psychology - 15 Credits

Optional Credits

Cyber Crime and Forensic Investigation Dissertation 30

Following two years of study the Dissertation is an extended independent study module that provides an opportunity for students to develop further study into an area or topic of their own choice and interest, including undertaking a piece of independent research. The student will:

  • Identify a topic of interest.
  • Provide a rationale for research their chosen topic.
  • Devise and submit a research proposal.
  • Conduct the research.
  • Write up and present the project and main findings.

As part of the presentation of findings the student will prepare and present a poster outlining the research process, main findings and conclusions before addressing questions from peers and tutors. The Dissertation is a double module which spans Semesters 1 and 2 and provides the student with an opportunity to develop their interests in a specific aspect of cyber crime as well as developing their research and communication skills.

Digital Forensic Investigation 30

This module covers the four phases of digital forensic investigation including seizure, imaging, analysis and reporting.  Technical knowledge and practical skills are developed using industry standard forensic software. Legal and regulatory processes are explored in detailed together with mobile forensic techniques.

Ethics for Digital and Forensic Investigation 15
Cyber Law and Regulation of the Information Society 15

This module will examine the emerging trends that signify the formation of the information society and also its relationship with law, technology, and public policy. This module will cover UK and European Union law along with a variety of international regulatory perspectives that seek to harmonise law. The module will analyse the many legal and regulatory challenges that the information society generates for society, particularly with regard to privacy, the creation of products, the media. Particular focus will be upon whether these challenges can be best resolved by law or some other means, for example, technology, education or simple market forces.

Presenting Forensic Evidence 15

This module will enable students to appreciate the various means by which scientific evidence can be presented.  The module will cover written reports, the use of modern multi-media technology in evidence presentation, and issues regarding the presentation of evidence in the witness box.  Students will consider whether popular media may affect the public perception of expert evidence and will be given training in presentation skills. 

Year 3 Optional Modules
  • Penetration Testing - 15 Credits
  • Crime Scene Investigation - 15 Credits
  • Document Analysis - 15 Credits
  • Forensic Linguistics 15 Credits
  • Advanced Forensic Examination - 15 Credits
  • Criminological Psychology - 15 Credits

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2020 Course Tuition Fees

 UK/EU

International

Year 1 £9,250 £13,500
Year 2 £9,250 £13,500
Year 3 £9,250 £13,500
Total £27,750 £40,500
Optional Sandwich Year £700 £700
Total with Sandwich Year £28,450 £41,200

If you are a UK or EU student starting your degree in September 2020, the first year will cost you £9,250*. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK and EU students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK/EU Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £112.50 and a 15 credit module is £1,687.

*The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year. 

ADDITIONAL COSTS

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Optional

Core texts

Core texts are available from the University Library. However some students prefer to purchase their own copies. Some core texts can be bought second-hand or as an ebook which can often reduce this cost. Indicative cost is £150 for whole course.

Mandatory

Laptop

Students are expected to have their own laptop to use on this course. Indicative cost is £200-£1,000.

Printing and Binding

We are proud to offer free printing for all students to ensure that printing costs are not a potential financial barrier to student success. The University of Winchester and Winchester Student Union are champions of sustainability and therefore ask that all students consider the environment and print fairly. Students may be required to pay for the costs of dissertation binding. Indicative cost is £1.50-£3.

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards page.

Key course details

UCAS code
I205
Duration
3 years full-time; 4 years full-time (sandwich); 6 years part-time
Typical offer
104-112 points
Location
On campus, Winchester