BSc (Hons)

Nutrition

B420

Would you like to play a role in enabling people to make appropriate lifestyle and food choices? Never has there been such broad public and media interest in what we eat and how it impacts our bodies and lives.

This dynamic, interdisciplinary course combines the study of nutrition science with health and wellbeing. It is aimed at those who have a keen interest in human nutrition and health, and can lead to registration as a nutritionist.

Healthy food on a table

Course overview

The theoretical foundations of this three-year programme are laid down in lectures and seminars. Practical workshops will allow you to gain experience in analysing diets using specialist software. Some hands-on work will be undertaken in our kitchens and biochemistry laboratory.

The theoretical foundations of this three-year programme are laid down in lectures and seminars. Practical workshops will allow you to gain experience in analysing diets using specialist software. Some hands-on work will be undertaken in our kitchens and biochemistry laboratory.

You will translate your learning into practical guidance to enable individuals and population groups to make appropriate lifestyle and food choices. Alongside the scientific topics of biochemistry and human physiology you will also study communication skills, research methods and ethics. You will have the option to study modules in global health and malnutrition and will share some modules, such as public health and scientific research in food, health and disease, with Dietetics students.

As part of our growing portfolio of health-related programmes, you will benefit from strong relationships with those teaching and studying nursing, health and wellbeing, physiotherapy and sports-related degrees. This will afford you the opportunity to work alongside other health professionals, such as dietitians, nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, sport therapists and sport scientists. To gain further first-hand professional insights, you can take a relevant work placement.

On completion of the degree you will have the knowledge to be able to educate people as to the best ways to eat and drink in order to keep their body fit and healthy.

What you need to know

Course start date

September

Location

On Campus

Course length

  • 3 years full-time

Apply

B420

Typical offer

112-120 points

Fees

From £9,250 pa

Course features

  • Pursue a rewarding career path where you can help people to make a real difference to their lives through a well-organised lifestyle and healthy eating habit
  • Gain the sought-after knowledge and skills required to work in this rapidly growing industry
  • Acquire valuable hands-on experience with a variety of service users and industry organisations through an optional placement in years 2 or 3
  • Learn from supportive and accessible lecturers who have experience of working in a wide range of related professional fields

Course details

This programme runs over three years, with the theoretical foundations being laid down in lectures and seminars.  Time will be given for practical workshops in which you will have experience in analysing diets using specialist software and obtain practice in analysing and diagnosing nutritional problems.  Some work will be undertaken in our kitchens and biochemistry laboratory.  Work placements and volunteering opportunities will be offered in your second and third years.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc., you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent Learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

In Year 1, you will study introductions to Biochemistry, Food Science, Nutritional Physiology, Sociology and Health as well as modules in Fundamentals of Communication, Understanding Global Health, and Preparing for Professional Practice.

With a good foundation in place, in Year 2 you critically explore areas such as Professionalism in Nutrition, Behavioural Science, Research Methods, Food Habits and Systems and Health Systems and Healthcare.

In your final year, you study Leadership, Management and Entrepreneurship, Nutrition in Sport and Exercise, Research Methods and Enterprise, Public Health and Epidemiology, Food and the Media, and undertake a Dissertation on a subject of your choice.

Volunteering and an optional work placement can be taken in Years 2 or 3. Proposed optional modules may include Health, Food and the Physical Environment, Eating Well: Food and Value in the 21st Century, and Practice Experience for Health and Wellbeing.

Overall Workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 1 (Level 4): Teaching, learning and assessment: 288 hours. Independent learning: 912 hours
Year 2 (Level 5): Teaching, learning and assessment: 276 hours. Independent learning: 900 hours. Placement: 24 hours
Year 3 (Level 6): Teaching, learning and assessment: 204 hours. Independent learning: 972 hours. Placement: 24 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course.

Teaching Hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage Assessed by Coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 1 (Level 4)*: 94% coursework. 6% written exams. 0%  practical exams
Year 2 (Level 5)*: 64% coursework. 22% written exams. 14% practical exams
Year 3 (Level 6)*: 93% coursework. 0% written exams. 7% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Modules

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing. The University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed. For further information please refer to winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions

Modules

Introduction to Biochemistry

This module offers an introduction to the study of nutrition from a biochemical perspective. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about what matters in biochemistry, nutrition, health and disease. This module will help students to understand difficult concepts and explore some of the fundamental questions and challenges in nutritional biochemistry today. Using examples from clinical cases, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to nutritional biochemistry, with consideration of the model and process of dietetic practice. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Fundamentals of Food Science

This module offers an introduction to food and catering systems management. As a key member of health food service operations, dietitians provide expertise to ensure recipes and menus are safe, sustainable and financially reasonable. This module also aims to increase students understanding of the importance of food safety and catering systems management, and its contribution to patient health outcomes. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking.

Preparing for Professional Practice

This module is designed to develop students’ professionalism for practice. It also aims to increase students understanding of the importance of professionalism, within the framework of the HCPC standards of conduct, performance and ethics and its intimate links to patient safety. A key factor within the module will be enabling students to investigate the factors involved in safe dietetic practice, including students’ responsibilities and how to raise concerns. The Model and process of dietetic practice will also be introduced in this module. Reflective practice and critical appraisal tools will also be used to appraise scientific evidence and other sources, to develop professionalism for safe and effective dietetic practice.

Introduction to Nutritional Physiology

This module offers an introduction to the study of nutrition from a physiological perspective. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about what matters in nutritional physiology and health. This module will help students to understand difficult concepts and explore some of the fundamental questions and challenges in nutritional physiology today. Using examples from clinical cases, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to nutritional physiology, with consideration of the model and process of dietetic practice. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Introduction to Human Nutrition

This module will use lectures to explore current issues in human nutrition. Specifically, this module will engage students in discussions around contemporary nutrition and health topics while considering Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis. This module will provide students with an understanding of DOHaD in addition to recent research advances in nutrition, the application to health and the relationship to professional issues in nutrition. In so doing, this module will  help students to understand the developmental origins of disease and health within a multicultural society through an appreciation and understanding of the DOHaD hypothesis and its evidence base. Using examples from across the  globe, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to health and disease, and the intergenerational impact of environmental and sociological insults. An emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking.

Introduction to Sociology and Health

This module offers an introduction to the study of dietetics from a sociological perspective. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about health inequalities in relation to how and where people live and the effect it has on their health and wellbeing, with consideration of the model and process of dietetic practice. In so doing, this module will help students to understand sociological concepts within a multicultural society through an appreciation and understanding of the discipline of sociology and its evidence base. Using examples from across the globe, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to sociology. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Fundamentals of Communication Skills

This module offers an introduction to the study of communication skills and supports students to be effective communicators. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about the need for ongoing continuous professional development in relation to communication skills. This module will help students to understand difficult concepts and explore some of the fundamental questions and challenges in communication skills training today. Using examples from across the globe, students will be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to communication skills. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on effective communication within the model and process of dietetic practice and the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking.

Fundamentals of Behavioural Science

This module offers an introduction to the study of dietetics from a behavioural sciences perspective. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about psychological theories of health and illness. This module will also help students to understand the psychological basis of eating, which will assist students with the psychological aspects of the Model and Process of dietetic practice. Using examples from across the globe, students will be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to health psychology. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Modules

Nutrition and Metabolism

This module is designed to further develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the metabolism of nutrients in the human body. The human body and its functions will be revisited in greater depth alongside the mechanisms for the integration of metabolism, at the molecular, cellular and whole body levels for human systems. Non-nutrient components of food and drink will be examined including the effects upon health. Students will learn how to analyse diets, calculating nutrient contents of foods and diets of individuals, justifying their choice of method of dietary assessment. The consequences of an unbalanced diet will be studied and the nature of common conditions that require dietary manipulation.

Professionalism in Nutrition

This module is designed to further develop students’ professionalism for practice, including leadership, team working and resilience in practice, business and workforce planning, within the framework of the Association for Nutrition standards of conduct, performance and ethics. Students will integrate and consolidate knowledge around the use of a values-based approach to nutrition care, individualisation of nutrition care, making every contact count and the use of patient/family centred care. The aim is to increase students understanding of the importance of professionalism, and its links to patient safety - including students’ responsibilities and how to raise concerns, particularly with respect to electronic patient records and the use of remote consultations. A key factor will be enabling students to practically demonstrate skills required for safe nutrition practice. Reflective practice and critical appraisal tools will also be used to appraise scientific evidence and other sources, to develop professionalism for safe and effective nutrition practice.

Food Habits and Systems

This module is designed to further develop students’ knowledge and understanding of food sources within the UK and internationally. They should be aware of staple foods, and the main sources of key nutrients. They will also explore novel sources of food.  They will study the effect on nutritional quality of methods of food production, preparation, preservation and fortification, including food sources and methods of cooking and storage. They should understand the issues associated with food sustainability and be able to formulate ideas and opinions concerning food, nutrients, and non-nutrient components of food and nutrition effectively and appropriately for human systems. Students will consider the impact of financial, social and environmental circumstances on diet and nutritional intake, including factors of religious and cultural beliefs and practices. 

Behavioural Science

This module offers students an opportunity to further develop and apply their knowledge of psychology and gain an understanding of current theories of psychology that are relevant to eating behaviour change in groups and individuals. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about what matters in dietetics. This module will help students to understand difficult concepts and examine some of the fundamental questions and challenges in dietetics today. Using examples from across the globe, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to eating behaviour change. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Research Methods

This module with develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the research process. This will include areas of research design such as constructing a research question, quantitative and qualitative research methods, the place of audit, sampling and recruitment, data governance, collection and analysis techniques and research quality/threats to credibility and trustworthiness of data. It will give students the opportunity to develop a protocol design, using group work, understand the ethical process, and how to manage a research project. It will also deal with issues of dissemination.

Health Systems and the Expansion of Health Care

The governments of the world are committed to expansion of health care through introducing Universal Health Coverage and ensuring ‘nobody is left behind’. The module considers the different purposes and priorities of different systems that have evolved and how their growth is interlinked with issues of culture, history, politics and power. A range of possible models for health systems are critiqued with a focus on case studies from low- and middle-income countries.

Food Science

This module is designed to aid students in acquiring the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment in the food industry and in food research, including numeracy, laboratory-based skills, written and verbal communication skills, information retrieval, and team working skills. Content will include the ability to plan, conduct, analyse and report on investigations into an aspect of nutrition in a responsible, safe and ethical manner.  Students will carry out sample selection and ensure validity, accuracy, calibration, precision, and replicability during collection in accordance with the basic principle of good clinical practice. Students should demonstrate the ability to obtain, record, collate, analyse, interpret and report nutrition-related data using appropriate qualitative and quantitative research and statistical methods in the laboratory working individually or in a group. Using health research methods, students will prepare, process, interpret and present data, using appropriate qualitative and quantitative techniques, SPSS, Excel and programmes for presenting data visually.

Optional modules
  • Health, Food and the Physical Environment - 15 Credits
  • Practice Experience for Health and Wellbeing - 15 Credits
  • The Brain, Human Nature and Ethics - 15 Credits

Modules

Leadership, Management and Entrepreneurship

This module considers the theory which supports the differences  between leadership, management and entrepreneurship.  The skills involved in leading and managing teams across a variety of services are explored including the complexities of group and team dynamics.  It explores the different roles played by the various members of the team and their staff development needs. Students will consider issues involved in developing policies for effective practice.  The role of reflective practice is considered and students have the opportunity to review their own plans for their own professional development.

Nutrition in Sport and Exercise

This module aims to critically evaluate the physiological and biochemical principles of sport and exercise within a nutritional context. Detailed consideration will be focused towards macronutrients and their role for individuals within a range of sport and exercise contexts. The module will provide students with skills surrounding the assessment and analysis of nutritional intake. The use of nutritional and supplement strategies will be critically evaluated in terms of performance enhancement and health.

Research Methods and Enterprise

This module critically examines research methods in dietetics. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about what matters in dietetics. This module will help students to understand difficult concepts and explore some of the fundamental questions and challenges in dietetics research today. Using examples from across the globe, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to the research process in dietetics. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Public Health and Epidemiology

This module critically examines the study of dietetics from a public health perspective. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about what matters in dietetics, public health, and food policy. This module will help students to understand difficult concepts and critically examine some of the fundamental questions and challenges in public health nutrition and epidemiology today. Using examples from across the globe, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to public health nutrition and epidemiology. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Dissertation

This module offers an introduction to the study of dietetics from a research perspective. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about what matters in dietetics research. This module will help students to understand difficult concepts and critically examine some of the fundamental questions and challenges in dietetics research today. Using examples from across the globe, students will be encouraged to critically reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to research in dietetics. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Food and the Media

The media is a significant entity in contemporary society, both in terms of the communication of information and provision of entertainment and in influencing people’s beliefs, attitudes and behaviour. The spread of popular access to the internet and the emergence of social media that enable users to create and share content and develop new forms of social network has further transformed the impact of the media in everyday life. This module explores the relationship between the media and health and nutrition from two perspectives. The first is how the media (both traditional and digital) influence health behaviours and public attitudes towards health, food and eating. The second perspective is how nutritionists and health professionals, agencies and service-users might use different types of media to inform, campaign and facilitate support. 

Optional modules
  • Volunteering for Health and Wellbeing - 15 Credits
  • Eating Well: Food and Value in the 21st Century – 15 Credits

Entry requirements

112-120 points

Our offers are typically made using UCAS tariff points to allow you to include a range of level 3 qualifications and as a guide, the requirements for this course are equivalent to:

  • A-Levels: BBC-BBB from 3 A Levels or equivalent grade combinations (e.g. BBB is comparable to ABC in terms of tariff points). A science A-level or equivalent at grade C or above. Biology or human biology are preferred, but other sciences are acceptable, including physical education and sport science.
  • BTEC/CTEC: DMM from BTEC or Cambridge Technical (CTEC) qualifications.  Level 3 BTEC science qualifications graded merit or above are considered on an individual basis. 
  • International Baccalaureate: To include a minimum of 2 Higher Level certificates at grade H4
  • T Level: Merit in a T Level

Additionally, we accept tariff points achieved for many other qualifications, such as the Access to Higher Education Diploma, Scottish Highers, UAL Diploma/Extended Diploma and WJEC Applied Certificate/Diploma, to name a few. We also accept tariff points from smaller level 3 qualifications, up to a maximum of 32, from qualifications like the Extended Project (EP/EPQ), music or dance qualifications. To find out more about UCAS tariff points, including what your qualifications are worth, please visit UCAS.

In addition to level 3 study, the following GCSE’s are required:

GCSEs in Mathematics and English Language at grade 4 or C, or higher. Functional Skills at level 2 is accepted as an alternative, however Key Skills qualifications are not. If you hold another qualification, please get in touch and we will advise further

If you will be over the age of 21 years of age at the beginning of your undergraduate study, you will be considered as a mature student. This means our offer may be different and any work or life experiences you have will be considered together with any qualifications you hold. UCAS have further information about studying as a mature student on their website which may be of interest.

International points required

If English is not your first language, a formal English language test will most likely be required and you will need to achieve the following:

  • IELTS Academic at 5.5 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in all four components (for year 1 entry)
  • We also accept other English language qualifications, such as IELTS Indicator, Pearson PTE Academic, Cambridge C1 Advanced and TOEFL iBT

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by contacting our International Recruitment Team via our International Apply Pages.

 

2024 Course Tuition Fees

  UK / Channel Islands /
Isle of Man / Republic of Ireland 

International

Year 1 £9,250 £16,700
Year 2 £9,250 £16,700
Year 3 £9,250 £16,700
Total £27,750 £50,100
Optional Sandwich Year* £1,850 £3,340
Total with Sandwich Year £29,600 £53,440

Additional tuition fee information

If you are a UK student starting your degree in September 2024, the first year will cost you £9,250**. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK students.

Remember, you don’t have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year.

UK Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £139.14 and a 15 credit module is £2,087.

* Please note that not all courses offer an optional sandwich year.

**The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year.

Additional costs

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Placement Expenses

Students will need to travel to placements and depending on location, possibly arrange accommodation. In some cases, there may be costs incurred for travel and accommodation. Some placement providers may require you to wear a uniform or adhere to clothing guidelines, e.g. wearing a plain coloured polo shirt.  This will be at your own expense.

Visits

Nutrition modules may include optional visits to specialist healthcare facilities, exhibitions etc. You will normally be expected to cover the cost of travel and admission, unless otherwise specified in the module profile.

Core texts

Core texts are available from the University Library; however some students prefer to purchase their own copies. These can be bought second hand or as an e-book, which can often reduce this cost. Indicative cost is £70-£299 per academic year.

Printing and Binding

The University is pleased to offer our students a printing allowance of £5 each academic year. This will print around 125 A4 (black and white) pages. If students wish to print more, printer credit can be topped up by the student. The University and Student Union are champions of sustainability and we ask all our students to consider the environmental impact before printing.

Occupational Health Check

The University will pay for an occupational health assessment; however, you may need to pay for immunisations if they are not covered by your GP. Once applicants accept their offer of a place, we will send instructions on how to submit your health declaration information and what is required.

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards page.

CAREER PROSPECTS

With increasing community interest in food, nutrition and health, there’s a real demand for specialists across a range of industry sectors. As a nutritionist you can work in non-clinical settings, both private and public, such as: educational and research institutions, food retailers and manufacturers, local authorities, the media, the National Health Service (NHS), overseas aid and sports organisations.

The University of Winchester ranks in the top 10 in the UK for graduate employability and further study according to the Graduate Outcomes Survey 2021, HESA.

Accreditation

We are seeking accreditation from the Association for Nutrition. Graduates from AfN-accredited nutrition degrees are eligible to apply for registered associate nutritionist (ANutr) registration via a simple direct entry path.

Pre-Approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degree with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

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