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COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Benefit from dedicated laboratories and computer rooms where you can learn a variety of psychological and social research methods
  • Gain hands-on experience of experiments, observation, interviews, questionnaires and psychometric tests in small group projects
  • Study in a supportive environment with your own personal tutor, plus one-to-one supervision for your extended project
  • Use our excellent links with relevant organisations in the local area to find a volunteering placement in your third year
  • Opportunity to study abroad in the United States for one semester

Social psychologists understand that ‘no man is an island’. On our Social Psychology programme you study how human behaviour is influenced by other people and the social contexts in which this occurs.

In a supportive study environment, you address the fundamental question of how an individual’s thoughts, beliefs and feelings are influenced by the presence of others. This leads to fascinating discussions about the nature of human identity and how we develop relationships. We also look at group identity and ask intriguing questions such as: ‘How can normally good people end up doing bad things?’.

During our three-year course, you consider all aspects of human experience and behaviour, introducing you to many different perspectives within psychology. These include social, developmental, cognitive and biological, and there is a strong focus on research methods.

In Year 1, you examine laboratory-based research methods, problem-based learning, and working as a psychologist. You develop skills in essay writing, reading journal articles, structuring arguments and using IT. Core models include Psychology in Contemporary Society, and Introduction to Psychological Disorders.

In your second year, you deepen your understanding of these different approaches and research methods, exercising greater independence in practical work. Core models include Society and Communication, and Developmental Psychology.

In the final year, your practical work culminates in an extended research project on a social psychology topic. You study Media Psychology, and Society, Politics and Prejudice and choose from a range of optional modules that may include Psychology in the Workplace and Eyewitness Psychology.

As well as the ‘intellectually stimulating’ teaching, students have commented on recent evaluations that they value the friendly, approachable and enthusiastic staff, the variety of different assessment types and the strong focus on employability.

Due to the wide range of skills, and the rigour with which they are taught, training in social psychology is widely accepted as providing an excellent preparation for many careers. In addition to subject knowledge, you also develop skills in communication, numeracy, analysis, teamwork, critical thinking and independent learning — all of which are highly valued by employers.

Graduates pursue careers in health and social care, education, marketing, public relations, management, human resources and the public sector.

To pursue professional careers in psychology you need to undertake further study and training. Graduates will be eligible to apply for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) status, which is an entry requirement for many accredited postgraduate training courses and the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist.

Careers

Graduates pursue careers in health and social care, education, marketing, public relations, management, human resources, and the public sector. Those wishing to pursue professional careers in psychology - such as clinical, educational, or occupational psychology - need to undertake further study and training to gain professional recognition. Graduates will be eligible to apply for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) status, which is an entry requirement for many accredited postgraduate training courses in psychology. This is the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist.

Due to the wide range of skills, and the rigour with which they are taught, training in psychology is widely accepted as providing an excellent preparation for many careers. In addition to subject knowledge, graduates also develop skills in communication; numeracy; analysis; teamwork; critical thinking; computing; independent learning; and many others, all of which are highly valued by employers.

For more information about graduate employment visit From Freshers to Future - what will yours be?

94.4% of our 2015/16 graduates (first degree and other undergraduate courses) were in employment and/or further study six months after completing their course.

The Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) record collects information about what those completing university go on to do six months after graduation. The Careers Service undertakes DLHE on an annual basis through surveys and a data collection process. DLHE is designed and strictly controlled by HESA.

Pre-approved for a Masters:

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

Please note this programme is only available for 2018 and not deferred (2019) entry.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Study abroad (optional):

USA; Europe (Bulgaria, Czech Republic) via Erasmus

Field trips:

Students have the opportunity to take part in an optional 14-day intensive field trip to the USA in Year 2 - previously, students have visited Las Vegas, driven along Route 66 and hiked in the Grand Canyon. In Year 3, students have the opportunity to take part in an immersive study tour of the American South (Civil Rights Immersive Study) - this trip retraces the steps of the Civil Rights movement and visits historical sites, museums and foundations.

Location:

King Alfred or West Downs, University of Winchester

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and Teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market.

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars, you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

YEAR 1 (LEVEL 4): TIMETABLED TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITY* 

Teaching, learning and assessment: 300 hours
Independent learning: 900 hours

YEAR 2 (LEVEL 5): TIMETABLED TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITY*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 240 hours
Independent learning: 960 hours

​​YEAR 3 (LEVEL 6): TIMETABLED TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITY*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 156 hours
Independent learning: 1044 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course.

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on our King Alfred Campus or at our West Downs Campus (Winchester). 

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

YEAR 1 (LEVEL 4)*:

67% coursework
25% written exams
8% practical exams

YEAR 2 (LEVEL 5)*:

56% coursework
31% written exams
13% practical exams

YEAR 3 (LEVEL 6)*:

61% coursework
33% written exams
6% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Student satisfaction:

100% Students (American and Australasian Studies) in work/study six months after finishing (https://unistats.direct.gov.uk)

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2018 Entry: 112-120 points

A GCSE A*-C or 9-4 pass in Mathematics and English Language is required.

International Baccalaureate: 26 points

If English is not your first language: Year 1/Level 4: IELTS 6.0 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in writing or equivalent

Please note this programme is only available for 2018 and not deferred (2019) entry.

Course enquiries and applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234

Send us a message

International students

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by emailing our International Recruitment Team at International@winchester.ac.uk or calling +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Days.

Year 1 (Level 4)

Semester 1 Credits

Psychology in Contemporary Society 15

This module will introduce students to the way in which psychology can be both used and mis-used in a variety of ways in contemporary society. A series of lectures will demonstrate the gap between scientific psychology and its occasional misinterpretation by groups including the media, business and even law enforcement. By the end of the module students should have a good understanding of the importance of scientific research and communication to the public. Students will research a selection of the topics presented, and write a portfolio of their findings in which they will be assessed on their critical analysis of the evidence and their ability to present scientific research in society. 

Perspectives in Psychology 15

In this module we take a critical look at a range of topics across the different sub-disciplines of psychology. The aim is to show how the same topics can be seen from different perspectives. This might include topics such as the psychology of communication and the psychological aspects of health and wellbeing. For example, we will look at health and wellbeing from an individual differences perspective (e.g. relating to self-esteem), a cross cultural perspective (e.g. in health beliefs), an applied perspective (e.g. health interventions) and health and wellbeing in the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on how to build an argument and how to use evidence to support or criticise the point(s) being discussed.  

Foundations in Psychology 30

This module introduces students to historical and contemporary perspectives on some of the core topics on the British Psychological Society’s required curriculum: biological psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, individual differences, social psychology and conceptual and historical issues. Students will gain an understanding of the interrelationship between theorising and investigation. In addition, seminars and tutorials support the development of some essential skills for psychology students, including reading journal papers, referencing, literature searching, essay writing and presentations. Students have the opportunity to take part in psychological experiments to support their understanding of the biological and cognitive psychology topics, enabling them to reflect on their experiences in a group presentation.

Introduction to Research Methods and Statistics 30

Students are introduced to research design and basic techniques of qualitative and quantitative data analysis through being required to collect, interpret, and display quantitative and quantitative data in a variety of methods. Students are encouraged to see how data analysis relates to research design and hence to understand and value the insights that can be gained by a competent knowledge of quantitative and qualitative analysis techniques. Basic concepts in the philosophy of science are addressed, and ethical issues are covered. Workshop sessions enable practise of data analysis skills. Students will carry out practical investigations in small groups to further develop skills in design, data collection, analysis and report writing. The practical investigation is selected to illustrate particular aspects of design or analysis with a progression towards more complex designs and more emphasis on theoretical issues.

Semester 2 Credits

Applied Psychological Skills for Career Development 15

The aim of this module is to help students develop an understanding of potential future career paths and a greater awareness of their strengths, values and areas for personal development. The module will focus on the specific skills’ package expected from psychology students during their studies and the transferability of these into the workplace, using the Higher Education Academy’s (HEA) Psychology Student Employability Guide as a foundation. Students will develop an understanding of what organisations might be looking for in candidates and how they can represent their own competencies in the most effective way. This will be achieved through engagement with psychological literature related to career development and the opportunity for students to reflect on this literature in relation to their own career aspirations. This module is delivered via lectures and workshops, supporting student career planning and encouraging students to develop and reflect on their skills and discipline specific interests.

Introduction to Psychological Disorders 15

Introduction to Psychological Disorders introduces students to the world of clinical psychology and the mental health conditions that clinicians encounter. They will be introduced to the history of abnormal psychology, from the origins of the asylum to the present day diagnostic system of the DSM. The module will focus on the psychological origins of a selection of prevalent mental health conditions by exploring both theoretical approaches in academic psychology and by studying examples of individual experiences. Students will study critical approaches to the clinical management of mental health and of the nature of psychological disturbance generally and its impact on the social environment. They will also be given some insight into the workings of clinical psychology in the UK context and the various career opportunities offered within the profession for psychology graduates.

Foundations in Psychology 30

This module introduces students to historical and contemporary perspectives on some of the core topics on the British Psychological Society’s required curriculum: biological psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, individual differences, social psychology and conceptual and historical issues. Students will gain an understanding of the interrelationship between theorising and investigation. In addition, seminars and tutorials support the development of some essential skills for psychology students, including reading journal papers, referencing, literature searching, essay writing and presentations. Students have the opportunity to take part in psychological experiments to support their understanding of the biological and cognitive psychology topics, enabling them to reflect on their experiences in a group presentation.

Introduction to Research Methods and Statistics 30

Students are introduced to research design and basic techniques of qualitative and quantitative data analysis through being required to collect, interpret, and display quantitative and quantitative data in a variety of methods. Students are encouraged to see how data analysis relates to research design and hence to understand and value the insights that can be gained by a competent knowledge of quantitative and qualitative analysis techniques. Basic concepts in the philosophy of science are addressed, and ethical issues are covered. Workshop sessions enable practise of data analysis skills. Students will carry out practical investigations in small groups to further develop skills in design, data collection, analysis and report writing. The practical investigation is selected to illustrate particular aspects of design or analysis with a progression towards more complex designs and more emphasis on theoretical issues.

Year 2 (Level 5)

Semester 1 Credits

Developmental Psychology 15

This module aims to introduce students to both developmental theory and developmental method. Developmental psychology covers not only a vast array of relevant phenomena, it also, possibly more so than other sub-disciplines, includes a considerable number of theoretical vantage points from which those developmental phenomena can be interpreted. There will be ample scope to let students engage with a number of conceptual and historical issues, as well as more contemporary ways of looking at development. Key will be the image of the child’s situated development within a complex setting in which social, biological and cultural factors play their part. Typical and atypical development across the lifespan (childhood, adolescence and ageing) will be considered in areas such as attachment, social relations, cognition, language and cultural development.  Students will also gain critical understanding and practical experience of research methods used by developmental psychologists.

Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods 30

This module aims to introduce students to qualitative and quantitative approaches to psychological research methods. The qualitative component will cover issues in qualitative design, qualitative data collection methods, and students will gain practical skills in coding and analysing qualitative data. The quantitative component of the module will comprise weekly statistics lectures and workshops, in which students go through a number of set work questions using a statistical software package (SPSS). The module will emphasise the acquisition of practical research skills (in relation to key methods of data collection and analysis), critical skills (e.g. through evaluating research papers and methods), and a broad awareness of ethical issues relating to both quantitative and qualitative research methods in psychology.

Society and Communication 30

This module provides students with a broad overview of social and personality aspects of human communication such as: social interaction (in crowds, online and via media), prejudice, aggression, altruism, attitude formation and change, and personality. It also develops their methodological skills with respect to the use of measurement scales.

Brain, Behaviour and Cognition 30

This module provides students with a broad overview of fundamental topics in Cognitive Psychology, such as sensation and perception, attention, language, learning, memory, thinking, problem solving, decision making, metacognition, consciousness and cognitive neuropsychology.  It will also provide an insight into the biological basis of human and non-human behaviour, including comparative and evolutionary psychology, typical and atypical neuropsychology, neuroscience, behavioural genetics, and the effect of hormones on behaviour. Conceptual and historical issues relevant to cognitive and biological psychology are also covered. Students will gain critical understanding and practical experience of research methods used by cognitive and biological psychologists.

Semester 2 Credits

Conducting Independent Psychological Research 15

This module is designed to prepare students for conducting independent psychological research required at level 6. The module will take students from the initial stages of choosing a topic and constructing research questions and hypotheses; searching and critically reviewing relevant literature; through to choosing appropriate research methods and paradigms, identifying samples and ethical considerations. Students will cover associated aspects of conducting independent research, such as, time and resource management. The module will also identify important areas of personal development and employability. Students will be encouraged to think about the development of their key research and transferrable skills throughout the module, as well as having the opportunity to attend a poster conference presented by current third year students.
Sessions will consist of taught classes, workshops and guided learning.

Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods 30

This module aims to introduce students to qualitative and quantitative approaches to psychological research methods. The qualitative component will cover issues in qualitative design, qualitative data collection methods, and students will gain practical skills in coding and analysing qualitative data. The quantitative component of the module will comprise weekly statistics lectures and workshops, in which students go through a number of set work questions using a statistical software package (SPSS). The module will emphasise the acquisition of practical research skills (in relation to key methods of data collection and analysis), critical skills (e.g. through evaluating research papers and methods), and a broad awareness of ethical issues relating to both quantitative and qualitative research methods in psychology.

Society and Communication 30

This module provides students with a broad overview of social and personality aspects of human communication such as: social interaction (in crowds, online and via media), prejudice, aggression, altruism, attitude formation and change, and personality. It also develops their methodological skills with respect to the use of measurement scales.

Brain, Behaviour and Cognition 30

This module provides students with a broad overview of fundamental topics in Cognitive Psychology, such as sensation and perception, attention, language, learning, memory, thinking, problem solving, decision making, metacognition, consciousness and cognitive neuropsychology.  It will also provide an insight into the biological basis of human and non-human behaviour, including comparative and evolutionary psychology, typical and atypical neuropsychology, neuroscience, behavioural genetics, and the effect of hormones on behaviour. Conceptual and historical issues relevant to cognitive and biological psychology are also covered. Students will gain critical understanding and practical experience of research methods used by cognitive and biological psychologists.

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

Society, Politics and Prejudice 15

This module will provide students with the opportunity to examine the ways in which psychology and psychological theories have been applied to a range of socio-political issues and concerns. Students will be introduced to a number of key topics in this area, e.g. political identities and behaviours; political participation and civic engagement; collective action and political violence; prejudice and discrimination, conspiracy theories, counter-culture and fringe, and persuasion and propaganda. These topics will build on knowledge and understanding that students have gained from first and second year modules, and will enable them to critically understand the ways in which these psychological theories have (or can) contribute to our understanding of social and/or political phenomena that are of contemporary concern. The lecture and seminar content will allow students to engage with contemporary debates in these areas, as well as familiarise themselves with a range of theoretical perspectives.

Media Psychology 15

This module aims to introduce students to media psychology through the study of specific topics and theoretical/methodological approaches. Media psychology is essentially the study of how human beings engage with the ‘mass’ media – from traditional media such as newspapers through to new media phenomena like social networking sites – and to what extent these influence behaviour. There will be a broad introduction to the field of communication science and its relationship to social psychology in particular, followed by more in-depth treatment of specific topics. This will include long-standing media psychology topics such as the influence of ‘media violence’, and will additionally introduce students to career opportunities in the field.

Research Project: Empirical 30

The project takes the form of an original independent empirical investigation in a psychological topic area.
Students are required to select their topic/research question before the end of Semester 2 of Level 5. They produce a research proposal as part of the course requirement for PS2802-Conducting Independent Research. Supervisors are allocated according to research topic. Data collection may only commence once ethical approval has been granted by the ethical committee. The indicative length of the project is 5,000 words for quantitative and 7000 for qualitative projects.

Optional Credits

Optional Modules
  • Advanced Issues in Developmental Psychology 15 Credits
  • Advanced Statistics and Applied Statistics 15 Credits
  • Topics in Educational Psychology 15 Credits
  • Conceptual Debates in Psychology 15 Credits
  • Cognitive Neuroscience 15 Credits
  • Psychology, Crime and the Criminal Justice System 15 Credits
  • Media Psychology 15 Credits
  • Society, Politics and Prejudice 15 Credits
  • Psychology in the Workplace 15 Credits
  • Evolutionary Psychology and Human Nature 15 Credits
  • Eyewitness Psychology 15 Credits
  • Health Psychology 15 Credits
  • Volunteering for Psychology 15 Credits
  • Advanced Critical Thinking in Psychology 15 Credits
  • Computational Skills in Psychology 15 Credits
  • Embodied Cognition and Contemplative Practice Studies               15 Credits
  • Value Studies  15 Credits

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Course Tuition Fees 

UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man

If you are a UK or EU student starting your degree in September 2018, the first year will cost you £9,250. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK and EU students. Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

Full-time £9,250 p/a

Total Cost: £27,750 (3 years) | £28,450 (sandwich option)

UK/EU Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,938

International Students

Full-time £12,950** p/a
Total Cost: £38,850** (3 years) | £39,550** (sandwich option)

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £107.92 and a 15 credit module is £1,620. Fees for students from Vestfold University College in Norway (who receive a 10% reduction) and NLA are £11,655.

 

ADDITIONAL COSTS

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Optional

Core texts: Core Texts are available from the University Library; however some students prefer to purchase their own copies. Some Core Texts can be bought second hand, or as an ebook which can often reduce this cost. Cost £400 for whole course. 

Mandatory

Binding: Students have to soft bind two copies of their project reports in the third year. This is a mandatory cost. Costs £5.

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards

Key course details

UCAS code
c880
Duration
3 years full-time; 4 years full-time (sandwich); 6 years part-time
Typical offer
104-120 points (2017 Entry)
Location
King Alfred Campus