Gender Pay Gap Report

What is the Gender Pay Gap report?

From 6 April 2017 organisations with more than 250 employees were required by the Government Equalities Office to publish annually gender pay data on the following basis:

  • Gender pay gap (mean and median averages)
  • Gender bonus gap (mean and median averages)
  • Proportion of men and women receiving bonuses
  • Proportion of men and women in each quartile of the organisation’s pay structure

It is important to state from the outset that a gender pay gap is not the same as equal pay. A gender pay gap is a measure of the difference between the average salaries of male and female employees across an organisation, whereas equal pay refers to the legal requirement for employers to pay male and female employees the same for undertaking the same or similar work, Therefore, it is possible for an organisation to have a gender pay gap despite it being fully compliant with its equal pay responsibilities. We are committed as an organisation to identifying and implementing practical steps to make a further reduction in our pay gap in the future.

2021

Gender Pay Gap Reporting 2021

Difference in mean hourly rate of pay:   

9.8%

 

Difference in median hourly rate of pay:

13.7%

 

 

 

 

Difference in mean bonus pay:

-11.7%

 

Difference in median bonus pay:

5.1%

 

 

 

 

 

Female

Male

Proportion of employees receiving bonus pay:

3.1%

4.6%

     

Proportion of employees quartile pay bands:

Upper

51.2%

48.8%

Upper Middle

60.0%

40.0%

Lower Middle

63.2%

36.8%

Lower

69.3%

30.7%

University of Winchester Gender Pay Gap – Year Ending 31 March 2021

The University of Winchester’s pay gap has narrowed significantly from where it stood the previous year. For the year ending 31 March 2021 the median pay gap was 13.7%, down from 18.6% the previous year. The mean pay gap has also reduced (but by a smaller margin) to 9.8%, down from 10.9% the previous year.

The University is pleased with the progress made towards its objective of minimising the gender pay gap, but we recognise that further progress is still required. We have worked collaboratively with our recognised trade unions on an action plan to address the gender pay gap. We will continue our implementation of the action plan and hope to be able to demonstrate further progress at the next annual review.

For the first time there are more female employees than male employees in the upper pay quartile, with female employees accounting for 51.2% of employees in that quartile.

The proportion of female staff in the lowest pay quartile has fallen from 71.7% to 69.3%

Bonus payments are not a major feature of the University’s remuneration policy. Less than 5% of university employees received a bonus payment in the year ending 31 March 2021, so the bonus pay gap figures are of only marginal relevance in the bigger picture of overall pay gap. The figures show that the mean pay gap for bonus payments was in favour of female employees, whereas the median pay gap was in favour of male employees.

2020

Gender Pay Gap Reporting 2020

Difference in mean hourly rate of pay:   

10.9%

 

Difference in median hourly rate of pay:

18.6%

 

 

 

 

Difference in mean bonus pay:

-9.0%

 

Difference in median bonus pay:

0.0%

 

 

 

 

 

Female

Male

Proportion of employees receiving bonus pay:

0.8%

0.8%

     

Proportion of employees quartile pay bands:

Upper

49.8%

50.2%

Upper Middle

60.7%

39.3%

Lower Middle

61.6%

38.4%

Lower

71.7%

28.3%

2019

Gender Pay Gap Reporting 2019

Difference in mean hourly rate of pay:   

11.0%

 

Difference in median hourly rate of pay:

16.2%

 

 

 

 

Difference in mean bonus pay:

47.1%

 

Difference in median bonus pay:

53.3%

 

 

 

 

 

Female

Male

Proportion of employees receiving bonus pay:

1.3%

0.5%

     

Proportion of employees quartile pay bands:

Upper

47.1%

52.9%

Upper Middle

59.4%

40.6%

Lower Middle

62.1%

37.9%

Lower

69.4%

30.6%

2018

Gender Pay Gap Reporting 2018

Difference in mean hourly rate of pay:   

11.7%

 

Difference in median hourly rate of pay:

16.2%

 

 

 

 

Difference in mean bonus pay:

25.7%

 

Difference in median bonus pay:

29.8%

 

 

 

 

 

Female

Male

Proportion of employees receiving bonus pay:

1.4%

1.0%

     

Proportion of employees quartile pay bands:

Upper

47.6%

52.4%

Upper Middle

60.6%

39.4%

Lower Middle

65.0%

35.0%

Lower

68.2%

31.8%

 

2017

Gender Pay Gap Reporting 2017

Difference in mean hourly rate of pay:   

13.8%

 

Difference in median hourly rate of pay:

22.0%

 

 

 

 

Difference in mean bonus pay:

50.7%

 

Difference in median bonus pay:

25.0%

 

 

 

 

 

Female

Male

Proportion of employees receiving bonus pay:

1.5%

1.6%

     

Proportion of employees quartile pay bands:

Upper

46.5%

53.5%

Upper Middle

61.2%

38.8%

Lower Middle

67.7%

32.3%

Lower

70.7%

29.3%

 

Looking Forward

We are committed to taking steps to address any barriers we identify to female career progression which are within our ability to influence. It remains the case that in the UK it is predominantly women who take primary responsibility for child care. Unless and until this societal norm changes women will continue to be the dominant gender in part-time jobs, which tend to be lower-paid roles. Therefore, to some extent it is the pace at which this societal norm weakens which will make the critical difference in our further efforts to narrow and ultimately eliminate the gender pay gap.