BA (Hons)

Classical Studies with Foundation Year

48NX

The ancient Greek and Roman worlds have given us an extraordinarily rich heritage of culture, literature, politics, philosophy, art, architecture and archaeology as well as paving the way for democracy, modern day sewers, underfloor heating and the calendar. Whatever you aspire to become – and Classical Studies students have conquered most fields – an understanding of the classical past gives you a keen lens through which to view the modern world. 

Artefacts in a museum

Course overview

Our BA in Classical Studies takes an innovative, multidisciplinary dive into this fascinating cultural and intellectual history. You gain a critical yet empathetic appreciation of different worldviews on a course that blends study of history, literature, drama, philosophy, archaeology, art and architecture. Knowledge of Classical languages is not required, but opportunities to learn and develop your language skills may be on offer.
The course contextualises and enriches the study of these disciplines through, theoretical, research and vocational elements. You explore the world of the Greeks and the Romans in both historical and contemporary contexts and so come to a new understanding of the world around us.
Our programme considers the reception of the Classical world from the medieval through to the modern world. You interact with the Classical world through field trips to Fishbourne Roman Palace and the British Museum, through modules in Neo-Classicism and through volunteer placement opportunities in the heritage sector.

A Foundation Year is the perfect way to boost your academic skills, build your confidence and develop your wider subject knowledge so you can succeed at Winchester. This course offers an extra year of study at the start (Year 0) which leads onto a full degree programme (Years 1, 2 and 3).

A Foundation Year is ideal if you are returning to education after a break; haven’t quite achieved the entry qualifications required; are wanting more support during the transition to studying at university; or are unsure about which subject you wish to pursue.

What you need to know

Course start date

September

Location

Winchester campus

Course length

  • 4 years full-time

Apply

48NX

Typical offer

48 points

Fees

From £9,250 pa

Course features

  • Get out of the library on organised field trips to Fishbourne Roman Palace and the British Museum, and placements in art galleries and museums
  • Work with experts in the fields of Roman and Greek history, Classical literature and drama, and Roman and Greek art and archaeology
  • Cover a range of exciting topics from the Minoans and the Bronze Age to Murder in the Classical City, and from Roman Sport and Leisure through to the Classical inheritance of the early medieval world and beyond
  • Hone your ability to understand and work in multicultural environments — highly valued by employers

Course details

Field trips

Students have the opportunity to undertake field trips, for example to Fishbourne Roman Palace, and placements, for example, to art galleries and the British Museum.

Study abroad

Our BA (Hons) Classical Studies course provides an opportunity for you to study abroad in the United States of America. For more information see our Study Abroad section.

Learning and teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market. 

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc., you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 0 (Level 3): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 288 hours

Independent learning: 912 hours

Year 1 (Level 4): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 216 hours

Independent learning: 984 hours

Year 2 (Level 5): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 180 hours

Independent learning: 1020 hours

Placement: 0 hours

Year 3 (Level 6): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 168 hours

Independent learning: 1032 hours

Placement: 24 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course. 

All Classical Studies students are encouraged to take the Winchester Passport. The Winchester Passport rewards students for taking part in activities which develop employability skills. Students typically undertake volunteering or a targeted work placement tailored to student interests.

Key features of the student experience are:

  • The opportunity to undertake the University of Winchester's Research Apprenticeship Programme (WRAP) which engages students in work with academics on a genuine research project (e.g. categorising inscriptions), so that they engage first-hand in cutting-edge scholarly activity and build vital transferable skills for the future
  • Established exchanges with partner institutions in the USA and Europe
  • Field trips to enhance student's knowledge and understanding with practical experiences
  • Variety of work and volunteer placements to both national and local institutions

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester.

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used can be found by attending an Open Day.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 0 (Level 3)*:

100% coursework
0% written exams
0% practical exams

Year 1 (Level 4)*:

83% coursework
13% written exams
4% practical exams

Year 2 (Level 5)*:

55% coursework
40% written exams
5% practical exams

Year 3 (Level 6)*:

75% coursework
10% written exams
15% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Modules

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing. The University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed. For further information please refer to winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions

Modules

Developing Academic Skills and a Sense of Vocation

This module is designed to support students with the transition to university, the development of the academic skills and attributes necessary for successful future study and the foundations of a developing sense of vocation.  Through a carefully structured and scaffolded series of seminars and workshops, students will be supported in building their self-awareness of, and confidence in, themselves as active learners.  Delivered in the context of their subject area and aligned with the development of academic skills and attributes required across all Foundation Year modules, workshops will focus on academic skills such as referencing, selecting and using valid academic resources, reading/researching for academic purposes, using feedback constructively and gaining confidence in contributing to discussions and debates.  Coordinated assessment points across the Foundation Year experience enables this module to provide students with ongoing support and opportunities to practice and develop their skills and confidence with a range of written and oral assessment types relevant to their subject area as they progress through the year.

Important Thinkers and the Big Questions

This module introduces students to invaluable meanings and understandings that are gained from being at university and participating in wider intellectual discussions and debates. Within the context of each Discipline foundation year, students are introduced to a range of thinkers and questions that have important in various ways across the discipline. Designed to further encourage the foundations of intellectual curiosity and critical thinking within and beyond their own subject, students will come to understand that inter and cross disciplinarity has an essential role to play in the academy and to their own intellectual progression.

Exploring the Past: People, Places and Perspectives

The past can be studied from numerous perspectives and in a variety of ways. This module introduces students to how historians, anthropologists, archaeologists and classicists have studied past societies and cultures across the globe. This is achieved by looking at the specific themes of conflict, culture, social relations and beliefs in various parts of the world from prehistoric times until the late twentieth century. We will also consider how current societies remember and examine the past and what it says about the contemporary world.

Modules

Case Studies I: Sources and Approaches to History

This module introduces students to the core skills required to study history successfully at degree level. History makes sense of the past by analysing surviving evidence. Such evidence is either secondary, which requires in-depth critical reading, or primary or original, which demands critical contextualisation and analysis. All such evidence has uses to the historian, not necessarily obvious, and all contains partiality, which historians are trained to overcome. Working in small groups with one staff member per group, there will be a balance between developing awareness of these overarching core skills (such as conducting research and mastering referencing conventions) and a case study where students work on academic reading connected to a particular topic. This intensive small group environment will help students adjust to the university environment and provide a venue for delivering other transitional and transferrable skills.

Case Studies II: Independent Study Project

This module builds upon Sources & Approaches in History, further developing students’ skills as independent researchers, and giving students an opportunity to do research of a critical nature, using both primary and secondary sources. Continuing to work in the same Case Study groups and topic as they did in Sources & Approaches, students undertake an individual research project, on a topic negotiated with a tutor. In addition, there will be an element of group work as students combine their individual findings, presenting on a subtopic of the module’s overarching theme. As this module concentrates upon developing skills there is an emphasis on training for future employment. Students will be expected to engage with careers service activities in semester 2 and to report their activities in a reflective blog.

Introduction to the Classical Greek World

This course presents an introduction to, and an examination of, life in classical Greece. Focussing on ancient Athens, where possible, we shall review the city’s rise to power and how that success was complemented by Athens’ emergence as a key site of great art and culture in the ancient world. Why Athens, of all cities? To try and answer that question we shall also consider the broader social and cultural forces that helped to shape the classical city. This is a foundational module that seeks to connect the different parts of life in the ancient Athens, even as it introduces students to the knowledge and skills required for future study of antiquity.

Introduction to Classical Greek Literature

This module provides the students with a general introduction to the main literary genres of the Classical Greek world. The timeframe considered is approximately from the eight century BC to the second century BC (from the Homeric epics to the literature of the Hellenistic and Imperial age). This survey of literary material can include epic poetry, lyric poetry, oratory, historiography, epigram, and other major literary genres. The goal is for students to become familiar with the different forms of literature found in Classical Greek sources and to be able to identify the distinguishing elements of each literary genre. At the same time, this module provides the students with an opportunity to become familiar with the best-known practitioners of each literary genre in ancient Greece. The module may also make forays into how these literary forms influenced later writing in the Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, and modern world.

Introduction to Classical Archaeology

The module will introduce the study of classical archaeology, and the methodologies and approaches that distinguish it from classical history and other branches of classical studies. It is thematically based, covering topics such as social structure, economics, urbanism, religion and military affairs. Material culture, such as weapons, coins, pottery, villas, fortifications, etc., will be explored, and the contribution it makes to classical archaeology assessed.

Introduction to the Classical Roman World

The study of Roman civilisation is the historical and cultural study of a wealth of events, individuals, cultures, monuments, landscapes, and sources of evidence. This module is an introduction to the Romans in Britain, beginning with pre-Roman settlement and culture. We will examine ancient sources carefully, both written and material; the course will cover the basic historical outline of the earliest Roman interest and invasion of Britain with Julius Caesar, through settlement and Romanisation, until the withdraw of Roman troops in the early fifth century. In addition to the historical and political impact of the Romans, this module will also consider the cultural aspects of everyday life, women in the province, settlement and building projects, and the impact of Romanisation on the local cultures as well as the Romans living there themselves.

Introduction to Classical Roman Literature

This module provides the students with a general introduction to the main literary genres of the Classical Roman world. The timeframe considered is approximately from the third century BC to the fifth century AD (from the beginnings of Roman literature with Livius Andronicus to the literature of the Imperial age). This survey of literary material can include epic poetry, elegy, oratory, historiography, epigram, satire, and other major literary genres. The goal is for students to become familiar with the different forms of literature found in Classical Roman sources and to be able to identify the distinguishing elements of each literary genre. At the same time, this module provides the students with an opportunity to become familiar with the best-known practitioners of each literary genre in ancient Rome. The module may also make forays into how these literary forms influenced later writing in the Medieval, Renaissance, and modern world.

Introduction to Classical Mythology

This module surveys the great mythical worlds imagined by the Greeks and Romans, exploring the major myths of the ancient gods and heroes in their social, historical, literary and visual context. How did the categories of myth, those great tales of a heroic past, come about? Who told these tales and why? What is the relationship between myth and ancient history, ancient religion, and ancient philosophy? This module will combine the study of original literary texts (in translation) with the analysis of art and architecture as it, first, sets out the great tales of ancient mythology and then attempts to make some sense of the role of myth. As well as studying key mythical stories in antiquity, students will also review the relationship between Greek and Roman myths and consider the reception of mythical ideas and images in later cultures beyond antiquity.

Modules

Reading Epic

Epic poetry had a pivotal role in the cultural, social, and political life of antiquity, and has had an enduring impact on the world’s cultural discourse across the ages. Students will read passages from the major Greek and Roman epic poems and follow some of the most widespread epic themes in their journey from the Bronze Age through the Roman Imperial era and on to the twenty-first century. Students will identify and discuss elements of continuity and innovation in the tradition, and focus on how epic literature was created, performed, and adapted in different contexts in order to create different national identities in antiquity, from archaic Greece to Imperial Rome. Furthermore, students may also consider various aspects of the reception of ancient epic through selected case studies.

History in Practice II

This module considers the planning and preparation of research and the methods and skills used, with particular reference to – but not sole consideration of – the dissertation. A wide range of historical approaches and methods are assessed, including use of local and national archives, databases and online sources, media and newspapers, visual images, standing remains, landscape and the material environment, public history, oral sources and scientific data. Ethics in historical research are also examined. The module aims to help students to develop their career goals through a series of tutorials and workshops designed to assist them with planning for future directions after graduation. Students will be expected to engage with careers service activities and to report their activities in a reflective journal.

Optional Modules

Classical Studies Optional Modules:

  • The Glory of Athens and the Shadow of Sparta - 15 Credits
  • Alexander the Great: in his Own Time - 15 Credits
  • Rome: the Rise of the Eternal City - 15 Credits
  • Imperial Rome: Caesar and Augustus - 15 Credits
  • The Symposium: Ancient Greek Drinking Culture - 15 Credits
  • The Culture of Neoclassicism - 15 Credits
  • The Greek World - 15 Credits
  • Introduction to the Classical Languages (Greek or Latin) - 15 Credits

 

Other Optional Modules:

  • The Investiture Contest - 15 Credits
  • The Archaeology and Anthropology of Death and Burial - 15 Credits
  • The Vikings and the Frankish World - 15 Credits
  • The Renaissance Court: Power Politics and Patronage - 15 Credits
  • Climate, Culture and Catastrophe in the Modern World - 15 Credits
  • Field Trip - 15 Credits
  • Work Placement - 15 Credits
  • Exploring Teaching as a Career - 15 Credits

Optional

Reading Epic

Epic poetry had a pivotal role in the cultural, social, and political life of antiquity, and has had an enduring impact on the world’s cultural discourse across the ages. Students will read passages from the major Greek and Roman epic poems and follow some of the most widespread epic themes in their journey from the Bronze Age through the Roman Imperial era and on to the twenty-first century. Students will identify and discuss elements of continuity and innovation in the tradition, and focus on how epic literature was created, performed, and adapted in different contexts in order to create different national identities in antiquity, from archaic Greece to Imperial Rome. Furthermore, students may also consider various aspects of the reception of ancient epic through selected case studies.

History in Practice II

This module considers the planning and preparation of research and the methods and skills used, with particular reference to – but not sole consideration of – the dissertation. A wide range of historical approaches and methods are assessed, including use of local and national archives, databases and online sources, media and newspapers, visual images, standing remains, landscape and the material environment, public history, oral sources and scientific data. Ethics in historical research are also examined. The module aims to help students to develop their career goals through a series of tutorials and workshops designed to assist them with planning for future directions after graduation. Students will be expected to engage with careers service activities and to report their activities in a reflective journal.

Optional Modules

Classical Studies Optional Modules:

  • The Glory of Athens and the Shadow of Sparta - 15 Credits
  • Alexander the Great: in his Own Time - 15 Credits
  • Rome: the Rise of the Eternal City - 15 Credits
  • Imperial Rome: Caesar and Augustus - 15 Credits
  • The Symposium: Ancient Greek Drinking Culture - 15 Credits
  • The Culture of Neoclassicism - 15 Credits
  • The Greek World - 15 Credits
  • Introduction to the Classical Languages (Greek or Latin) - 15 Credits

 

Other Optional Modules:

  • The Investiture Contest - 15 Credits
  • The Archaeology and Anthropology of Death and Burial - 15 Credits
  • The Vikings and the Frankish World - 15 Credits
  • The Renaissance Court: Power Politics and Patronage - 15 Credits
  • Climate, Culture and Catastrophe in the Modern World - 15 Credits
  • Field Trip - 15 Credits
  • Work Placement - 15 Credits
  • Exploring Teaching as a Career - 15 Credits

Modules

Dissertation

The Dissertation (Extended Independent Study) is an 8,000 -10,000 thesis on a subject of a student’s choice. It makes an original contribution to historical knowledge and understanding. It demonstrates an advanced capacity to work as a historian and to employ the conventions of a historian. Students must produce by due deadlines a proposal acceptable to internal scrutineers, evidence of substantial progress by the end of the first module as part of the assessment for the Research Methods module, and a record of supervision completed by the supervisor with the Dissertation.

Writing History

This module is taught through small seminar groups only. In these groups, students will be able to explore the nature of historical research and historical debate through reflection on their own dissertation and the sharing of best practice with other students. It will allow a more supportive learning environment whilst ensuring a more active engagement with individual research.

History Matters

What first piqued your interest in history… A particular film, a video game, an enjoyable museum visit? In whatever ways we engage with the past, it is clear that history matters now. From political justifications to historical controversies, this module will give you the opportunity to explore how and why history features in our everyday lives. The material discussed throughout this module raises questions over the importance of historical narratives in popular media, politics, heritage, and education. You will be encouraged to reflect on your own academic study of history and how this can be mobilised for the wider benefit of society. Through an assessment of both academic and practical applications of history, this module will introduce you to the uses (and abuses) of history for public consumption and the varied employment options for graduates of the discipline.

Optional Modules

Classical Studies Optional Modules:

  • Pax Romana: From the Julio-Claudians to the Severans, AD 14-235 - 30 credits
  • Depth Study: Herodotus: Tall Tales and Epic Histories - 30 Credits
  • Depth Study: Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Literature - 30 Credits
  • Games & Gladiators - 15 Credits
  • Murder in the Ancient City - 15 Credits
  • Summer Studies in Athens or Rome - 15 Credits
  • Classical World in Film - 15 Credits
  • Plutarch and his Great Lives - 15 Credits
  • The Fall of the Ancient City - 15 Credits
  • Greco-Roman Egypt 331-31 BC - 15 Credits
  • Minoans and Mycenaeans: the Greek Bronze Age - 15 Credits

Other Optional Modules:

  • Medieval Hostageships - 15 Credits
  • Apocalypse Then and Now! Disasters in World History - 15 Credits
  • The Celts - 15 Credits
  • Work Placement - 15 Credits

Optional

Dissertation

The Dissertation (Extended Independent Study) is an 8,000 -10,000 thesis on a subject of a student’s choice. It makes an original contribution to historical knowledge and understanding. It demonstrates an advanced capacity to work as a historian and to employ the conventions of a historian. Students must produce by due deadlines a proposal acceptable to internal scrutineers, evidence of substantial progress by the end of the first module as part of the assessment for the Research Methods module, and a record of supervision completed by the supervisor with the Dissertation.

Writing History

This module is taught through small seminar groups only. In these groups, students will be able to explore the nature of historical research and historical debate through reflection on their own dissertation and the sharing of best practice with other students. It will allow a more supportive learning environment whilst ensuring a more active engagement with individual research.

History Matters

What first piqued your interest in history… A particular film, a video game, an enjoyable museum visit? In whatever ways we engage with the past, it is clear that history matters now. From political justifications to historical controversies, this module will give you the opportunity to explore how and why history features in our everyday lives. The material discussed throughout this module raises questions over the importance of historical narratives in popular media, politics, heritage, and education. You will be encouraged to reflect on your own academic study of history and how this can be mobilised for the wider benefit of society. Through an assessment of both academic and practical applications of history, this module will introduce you to the uses (and abuses) of history for public consumption and the varied employment options for graduates of the discipline.

Optional Modules

Classical Studies Optional Modules:

  • Pax Romana: From the Julio-Claudians to the Severans, AD 14-235 - 30 credits
  • Depth Study: Herodotus: Tall Tales and Epic Histories - 30 Credits
  • Depth Study: Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Literature - 30 Credits
  • Games & Gladiators - 15 Credits
  • Murder in the Ancient City - 15 Credits
  • Summer Studies in Athens or Rome - 15 Credits
  • Classical World in Film - 15 Credits
  • Plutarch and his Great Lives - 15 Credits
  • The Fall of the Ancient City - 15 Credits
  • Greco-Roman Egypt 331-31 BC - 15 Credits
  • Minoans and Mycenaeans: the Greek Bronze Age - 15 Credits

Other Optional Modules:

  • Medieval Hostageships - 15 Credits
  • Apocalypse Then and Now! Disasters in World History - 15 Credits
  • The Celts - 15 Credits
  • Work Placement - 15 Credits

Entry requirements

48 points

Our offers are typically made using UCAS tariff points to allow you to include a range of level 3 qualifications and as a guide, the requirements for this course are equivalent to:

A-Levels: EEE from 3 A Levels or equivalent grade combinations (e.g. BBB is comparable to ABC in terms of tariff points)

BTEC/CTEC: PPP from BTEC or Cambridge Technical (CTEC) qualifications International Baccalaureate: To include a minimum of 1 Higher Level certificates at grade H4

T Level: Merit in a T Level

Additionally, we accept tariff points achieved for many other qualifications, such as the Access to Higher Education Diploma, Scottish Highers, UAL Diploma/Extended Diploma and WJEC Applied Certificate/Diploma, to name a few.We also accept tariff points from smaller level 3 qualifications, up to a maximum of 32, from qualifications like the Extended Project (EP/EPQ), music or dance qualifications. To find out more about UCAS tariff points, including what your qualifications are worth, please visit UCAS.

In addition to level 3 study, the following GCSE’s are required:

GCSEs in Mathematics and English Language at grade 4 or C, or higher. Functional Skills at level 2 is accepted as an alternative, however Key Skills qualifications are not. If you hold another qualification, please get in touch and we will advise further.

If you will be over the age of 21 years of age at the beginning of your undergraduate study, you will be considered as a mature student. This means our offer may be different and any work or life experiences you have will be considered together with any qualifications you hold. UCAS have further information about studying as a mature student on their website which may be of interest.

International points required

If English is not your first language, a formal English language test will most likely be required and you will need to achieve the following:

  • IELTS Academic at 5.5 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in all four components (for year 1 entry)
  • We also accept other English language qualifications, such as IELTS Indicator, Pearson PTE Academic, Cambridge C1 Advanced and TOEFL iBT.

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by contacting our International Recruitment Team via our International Apply Pages.

2024 Course Tuition Fees 

  UK / Channel Islands /
Isle of Man / Republic of Ireland

International

Year 1 £9,250 £16,700
Year 2 £9,250 £16,700
Year 3 £9,250 £16,700
Year 4 £9,250 £16,700
Total £37,000 £66,800
Optional Sandwich Year* £1,850 £3,340
Total with Sandwich Year £38,850 £70,140

Additional tuition fee information

If you are a UK student starting your degree in September 2024, the first year will cost you £9,250**. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a four-year degree would be £37,000 for UK students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £139.14 and a 15 credit module is £2,087.

* Please note that not all courses offer an optional sandwich year. To find out whether this course offers a sandwich year, please contact the programme leader for further information.

**The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year.

Additional costs

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the optional costs for this course:

Optional

Overseas trip

Students have the option to attend a trip to a Film Festival throughout the duration of the course. Indicative cost: £375 per academic year.

Technology

It is recommended that students purchase their own hard-drive storage at the beginning of the course. Indicative cost: 2TB devices cost £80.

Disclosure and Barring Service

A Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance check may be required if you undertake a placement, volunteering, research or other course related activity where you will have contact with children or vulnerable adults. The requirement for a DBS check will be confirmed by staff as part of the process to approve your placement, research or other activity. The indicative cost is £40.

Mandatory

Printing and Binding

The University is pleased to offer our students a printing allowance of £5 each academic year. This will print around 125 A4 (black and white) pages. If students wish to print more, printer credit can be topped up by the student. The University and Student Union are champions of sustainability and we ask all our students to consider the environmental impact before printing.

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Our graduates are valued in a wide variety of occupations including business, law and accountancy, the civil service, local government and social services. Others teach or write for television, film and radio.

Some of our graduates go on to postgraduate work, and often study MA degrees in related subjects, such as classical archaeology, ancient history and Latin languages and literature. Becoming a specialist is the first step towards pursuing an academic career as a lecturer or researcher.

The University of Winchester ranks in the top 10 in the UK for graduates in employment and further study according to the Graduate Outcomes Survey 2023, HESA.

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

OUR CAREERS SERVICE
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