Jump to:

COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Huge range of research possibilities
  • Opportunities to discuss and debate key themes with visiting speakers
  • Taught by highly respected and experienced researchers

History at Winchester concentrates on different geographical scales of history, including local and global perspectives. It gives you the opportunity to engage with a range of approaches to the study of history, examining a range of historical subjects from ancient history to the present.

Start the course by exploring historical methods and research skills, followed by in-depth topic-based modules and the opportunity to devise and develop a specialist dissertation. The Approaches to the Past module, in the first semester, provides guidance on the different approaches to the study of history, including geographical scales of study and disciplinary approaches.

There are four core modules: Approaches to the Past, Research Methods and Skills, an Independent Study Presentation, and a dissertation. You also choose three special study modules from a long and varied list of options. Examples include Sport and Leisure in Victorian Britain; Reading and Writing the Holocaust: Historiography, Memory and Representation, 1945 to the Present; Public Health and Medicine in Modern Japan 1868–1952; and Female Agency and Rule in the Premodern Mediterranean 700–1700.

During the final summer of studies you write a 20,000-word dissertation, with specialist supervision. Research training for the dissertation is provided in a specialist module through a blend of electronic learning and face-to-face contact, which helps you complete a range of research tasks associated with the development of your dissertation. This leads to a Day Conference (Independent Study Presentation), in which you showcase your dissertation plans and their development, and debate themes in the study of history with external speakers.

Graduates of the course work in academia, teaching, archives, libraries, government and civil service, museums and conservation, as well as in a range of professions in the private sector, including financial consulting. The course provides a firm foundation for undertaking a postgraduate research degree or further training.

Careers

Graduates work in teaching, archives, libraries, government and civil service, museums and conservation. The programme provides a firm foundation for undertaking a postgraduate research degree or further training.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and teaching

Students attend lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, a day conference and excursions. The teaching team is made up of highly respected and experienced researchers.

Teaching takes place: Evenings/ weekends, with some individual tutorials during the day.

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on our King Alfred Campus (Winchester) or at our West Downs Campus (Winchester)

Assessment

Assessment on the programme is largely by written assignments, usually a 4,000 word essay, and this applies to most modules. The dissertation is a substantial piece of independent research with full tutorial support. For this, students are required to write around 20,000 words on a subject of their choice covered by their study.

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2018 Entry: Normally a first or upper second-class Honours degree in a related subject or professional experience in the area of study. It is the programme's policy to interview all applicants either in person or, where not possible, via Skype.

If English is not your first language

IELTS 6.5 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in writing or equivalent

Course Enquiries and Applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234

Send us a message

International students

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by emailing our International Recruitment Team at International@winchester.ac.uk or calling +44 (0)1962 827023

Applications need to be submitted before the 31 May 2018. Late applications can be accepted throughout the remainder of the application year, for more information see our How to Apply section.

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Evenings.

Year : Level 7

Modules Credits

Dissertation 60

The dissertation is the culmination of the MA in History and is designed to offer opportunities for research, study and reflection. By implementing a specially designed research strategy appropriate to the particular subject the student is expected to gain a comprehensive and insightful understanding of the specific topic and a clearer grasp of the disciplinary procedures of up-to-date historical studies.

Independent Study Presentation 20

Students who have submitted an approval proposal for their dissertation undertake preliminary work on their chosen topic. They present critical reports on their progress in the semester after they have completed the Research Methodology module (RT7122). This module must be passed as a prerequisite for embarking on the dissertation but may also be taken as the end point of the Postgraduate Diploma.

Research Methods and Skills 20

In addition to developing the particular knowledge relating to given field of investigation, postgraduate students need both to reflect on the nature of that discipline, to identify its place in the range of human areas of intellectual investigation, to identify particular methods and skills relevant to their disciple from a wide range of methods and skills, to develop those skills and to begin their implementation in a significant and agreed topic of research. Students also use information technology to create bibliographies, make appropriate use of online resources, and to access research materials; they explore appropriate modes of research-topic identification, hypothesis formation, and methodology selection; they practice techniques for moving from note taking, and data-collection to the outlining, sectioning, writing-up and presentation of the research project materials.

Approaches to the Past 20

In addition to developing the particular knowledge relating to given field of investigation, postgraduate students need both to reflect on the nature of that discipline, to identify its place in the range of human areas of intellectual investigation, to identify particular methods and skills relevant to their disciple from a wide range of methods and skills, to develop those skills and to begin their implementation in a significant and agreed topic of research.  Students also use information technology to create bibliographies, make appropriate use of online resources, and to access research materials; they explore appropriate modes of research-topic identification, hypothesis formation, and methodology selection; they practice techniques for moving from note taking, and data-collection to the outlining, sectioning, writing-up and presentation of the research project materials.

Optional Credits

Optional Modules

Three Special Study modules from a list of options (please note that not all the Special Study modules will run every year):

  • Anglo-Saxon Wessex – 20 Credits
  • Religion and Society: the Secular Church of Late Medieval Wessex – 20 Credits
  • The Rulers of the Late Medieval – 20 Credits
  • English Provinces – 20 Credits
  • Hampshire and Sussex c.1660-c.1830 – 20 Credits
  • Religion in England c.1660-c.1830 – 20 Credits
  • Poverty in the South of England 1770-1870 – 20 Credits
  • Sport and Leisure in Victorian Britain – 20 Credits
  • Normandy c.900-1204 – 20 Credits
  • Reading and Writing the Holocaust: Historiography, Memory and
  • Representation, 1945 to the Present – 20 Credits
  • Approaches to the Study of Women and Gender – 20 Credits
  • The 'Good War': the United States and WWII – 20 Credits
  • Public Health and Medicine in Modern – 20 Credits
  • Japan 1868-1952 – 20 Credits
  • The 'Fifteen-year War' and Public Memory in Post-war Japan – 20 Credits
  • Consumption in Communist Europe – 20 Credits
  • Soviet History through Film – 20 Credits
  • Medicine and Society in Southern England 1550-1700 – 20 Credits
  • The Age of Jackson – 20 Credits
  • The Organisation and Representation of Colonial Violence – 20 Credits
  • The Culture of Defeat – 20 Credits
  • Late Medieval Government – 20 Credits
  • Late Medieval Demography – 20 Credits
  • Roman Imperialism 327-30 BC – 20 Credits
  • Tudor Rebellions – 20 Credits
  • 'Women Worthies': The Study of Famous Females from Boccaccio to the Present – 20 Credits
  • Female Agency and Rule in the Premodern Mediterranean 700-1700 – 20 Credits
  • Documenting the Local Past – 20 Credits
  • Transnational Ideologies in Action: Liberalism, Socialism and Anarchism – 20 Credits
  • Genocide Memory and Representation  - 20 Credits
  • The Limits to Growth? Past and Present Approaches to Environmental Change – 20 Credits
  • Church, Society, and Conflict in the Medieval West c.1000-c.1150 – 20 Credits
  • Anglo-Saxon Charters – 20 Credits
  • Thatcher's Britain – 20 Credits
  • Ordinary Life - Work and Play in the Roman World – 20 Credits
  • The Lives of Greek and Roman Poets – 20 Credits

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Course Tuition Fees

UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man

Full-time entry | £5,500
Part-time entry | £2,750 p/a

Total Cost | £5,500

International Students

Full-time entry | £12,950
Part-time entry | £6,475 p/a

Total Cost | £12,950

ADDITIONAL COSTS

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards.

Key course details

Duration
Full-time: 1 year Part-time: 2 years
Typical offer
Normally a first or upper second-class Honours degree in a related subject or professional experience in the area of study.
Location
King Alfred Campus or at West Downs, Winchester