View content
Jump to:

COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Education Studies achieved 100% overall satisfaction as rated by final-year undergraduate students in the 2018 National Student Survey
  • Engage with theoretical perspectives from ancient Greece to the present day
  • Explore the weird and wonderful world of abstract mathematics
  • Learn how to apply educational theory to real life contexts and settings

Education Studies and Mathematics offers a means of engaging with a range of theoretical perspectives from historical to the present day. These perspectives are examined in such a way as to enable you to think deeply not only about developments in educational and mathematical theory and practices but to develop sound knowledge of your subject areas, an informed critical voice and the capacity for the critical application of their knowledge to a range of real life settings in and beyond formal education.

In Years 1 and 2 you maintain a 50/50 balance between mathematics/education studies modules, Year 3 requires students to undertake 90 credits on Education Studies related subjects. Additionally, students will be required to complete a dissertation in Education Studies during their final year.

Year 1 provides an introduction to the range of educational, mathematical and statistical theories which provides the foundations for successful study.

Year 2 requires you to engage deeply in the study of educational concepts, issues and abstracts ideas through engagement with challenging primary texts. This is complemented by the opportunity to explore the beauty and power of mathematics in action and the weird and wonderful world of abstract mathematics by exploring several modern mathematical theories such as calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations.

In Year 3 you will focus on the critical application of theory to a wide range of educational situations, contexts, settings and experiences in the real world and to the development of specialised mathematical knowledge.

Careers

Graduates of the programme will be well equipped to enter a wide range of business and careers in the public, private and third sectors. In addition, the programme is likely to attract students who intend to enter educational professions as subject specialists. Whilst graduates of the programme will be able to embark on postgraduate teacher training with mathematics as a subject specialism across the range of sectors through primary, secondary and further education. Graduates will also be well equipped for a range of Masters level study and beyond.

94% of our 2016/17 graduates (first degree and other undergraduate courses) were in employment and/or further study six months after completing their course (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey).

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for Applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Study Abroad

BA (Hons) Education Studies and Maths students are able to take part in the optional study abroad programme at level 5 providing they are able to secure a host institution that offers comparable modules or complete any mandatory modules in addition to the study abroad opportunity.

For more information see our Study Abroad section.

Learning and Teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market.                     

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc.), you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 1 (Level 4): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 312 hours
Independent learning: 888 hours

Year 2 (Level 5): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 240 hours
Independent learning: 960 hours

Year 3 (Level 6): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 228 hours
Independent learning: 972 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course.

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester.

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

The University library is open seven days a week, 24 hours a day.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 1 (Level 4)*:

47% coursework
21% written exams
32% practical exams

Year 2 (Level 5)*:

81% coursework
6% written exams
13% practical exams

Year 3 (Level 6)*:

82% coursework
5% written exams
13% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.

 

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2020 Entry: 104-120 points
2021 Entry: 96-112 points

An A level A*-C pass is required in Mathematics.

A GCSE A*-C or 9-4 pass in Mathematics and English Language is required.

International Baccalaureate: 104-120 points to include a minimum of 2 Higher level IB certificates at grade 4 or above.

If English is not your first language: IELTS 6.0 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in writing or equivalent

A grade 5 in Mathematics is required.

Course enquiries and applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234
Send us a message

International Students

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by emailing our International Recruitment Team at International@winchester.ac.uk or calling +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Days.

Year 1 (Level 4)

Modules Credits

Calculus
Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Probability and Statistics
Principles in Education
Educational Reflections

Students will take either Literacies in Higher Education or Educational Reflections as designated by the programme in any given year.

1944-88: The Acts
Literacies in Higher Education 15

‘Reading’ Education Studies requires more of the ‘reader’ than the basic ability to translate symbols on a page into words. The module provides an introduction into interpreting and referencing a range of resources which may include newspapers, films, internet websites, television, radio, fine art, popular art, ephemera, academic journals, novels, non-fiction books and music. In doing so, students will develop a broad range of higher education literacies. It will also prompt an exploration of what it means to be a higher education student in the larger context of society, including the implications and responsibilities which are the core of this new identity.

Year 2 (Level 5)

Modules Credits

Mathematical Methods
Statistical Methods
Education: Social and Political Thought
Education: Social and Political Thought (2)
Year 2 Optional Modules

Vector Calculus
What is a Child?
Thinking about ‘Race’
Independent Study
Theorising Early Childhood
Impairments, Disability and Inclusion
Theories of Discipline
Theorising Progressive Education
Thinking the Holocaust
Knowing through Observation
Globalisation and Comparative Education
Physical Education
Constructing Identity: Teachers’ Lives and Pupils’ Stories
Theorising Special and Inclusive Education
What was a Teacher? Histories of Teacher Education
‘Pioneers and Separate Spheres’ Gender and History of Education 1789-1923
Social Inclusion and Exclusion
Sexuality: Education, Policy and Practice
The Teacher: Power and Pedagogy
Education and Work
Education & Nature: learning in the Anthropocene
Education Beyond Left and Right
Culture/ Education
Education and Christianity
Philosophies of Education
Play

Optional Credits

Mathematical Methods
Statistical Methods
Education: Social and Political Thought
Education: Social and Political Thought (2)
Year 2 Optional Modules

Vector Calculus
What is a Child?
Thinking about ‘Race’
Independent Study
Theorising Early Childhood
Impairments, Disability and Inclusion
Theories of Discipline
Theorising Progressive Education
Thinking the Holocaust
Knowing through Observation
Globalisation and Comparative Education
Physical Education
Constructing Identity: Teachers’ Lives and Pupils’ Stories
Theorising Special and Inclusive Education
What was a Teacher? Histories of Teacher Education
‘Pioneers and Separate Spheres’ Gender and History of Education 1789-1923
Social Inclusion and Exclusion
Sexuality: Education, Policy and Practice
The Teacher: Power and Pedagogy
Education and Work
Education & Nature: learning in the Anthropocene
Education Beyond Left and Right
Culture/ Education
Education and Christianity
Philosophies of Education
Play

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

Dissertation
Year 3 Optional Modules

Mathematical Modelling
Construction of Gender Roles in Schools
Democracy and Education
Independent Study
Loss of Childhood
Early Years Education
Critiquing Higher Education
Constructing the Other: Race, Ethnicity and Religion
Educating the Teenage Consumer
The Inclusive Educator: Values, Virtues and Practice
Philosophy of the Teacher
Discipline and the Soul
Holocaust Education
Marxism’s and Schooling
Exclusion in and from Schooling: Critical Reflections on Teaching, Policy and Theory 
Life, Death and Education
Utopia and Education
Education and the Arab-Islamic World
Film as Education
Reconceptualising Early Childhood Education (RECE)
Contemporary Theory and Practice in Early Childhood
Early Childhood in a Changing World
Philosophy, Education and the Learning Person
Deconstructing Philosophies of Education
Education and Jewish Thought
Education, Ecologies & Ethics
Critiquing Inclusive Educational Practice
Critiquing the Museum Experience
The Language of Inclusion in Education
Education, Inclusion and Refugees
Evaluating Educational Research
Liberal Education

Optional Credits

Dissertation
Year 3 Optional Modules

Mathematical Modelling
Construction of Gender Roles in Schools
Democracy and Education
Independent Study
Loss of Childhood
Early Years Education
Critiquing Higher Education
Constructing the Other: Race, Ethnicity and Religion
Educating the Teenage Consumer
The Inclusive Educator: Values, Virtues and Practice
Philosophy of the Teacher
Discipline and the Soul
Holocaust Education
Marxism’s and Schooling
Exclusion in and from Schooling: Critical Reflections on Teaching, Policy and Theory 
Life, Death and Education
Utopia and Education
Education and the Arab-Islamic World
Film as Education
Reconceptualising Early Childhood Education (RECE)
Contemporary Theory and Practice in Early Childhood
Early Childhood in a Changing World
Philosophy, Education and the Learning Person
Deconstructing Philosophies of Education
Education and Jewish Thought
Education, Ecologies & Ethics
Critiquing Inclusive Educational Practice
Critiquing the Museum Experience
The Language of Inclusion in Education
Education, Inclusion and Refugees
Evaluating Educational Research
Liberal Education

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2020 Course Tuition Fees

 UK/EU

International

Year 1 £9,250 £13,500
Year 2 £9,250 £13,500
Year 3 £9,250 £13,500
Total £27,750 £40,500
Optional Sandwich Year £700 £700
Total with Sandwich Year £28,450 £41,200

If you are a UK or EU student starting your degree in September 2020, the first year will cost you £9,250*. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK and EU students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK/EU Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £112.50 and a 15 credit module is £1,687.

*The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year. 

ADDITIONAL COSTS

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Optional

Assignments

In the student’s first year of study, students may be required to complete a poster assignment in one of the core modules. Indicative cost is £8.

In the second year, an optional module on Play requires the student to construct a play resource. Indicative cost is £5.

Books

In student’s second year of study, students are recommended to purchase four set books which are available second-hand. Indicative cost is £20.

Trip

Some optional modules in the second and third year may include non-mandatory external visits to locations in Hampshire or London. The cost of travel and expenses will need to be covered by the student and depending on location. Indicative cost is £5-£40.

Volunteering Placement

Volunteering in the second year may incur travel costs that need to be covered by the student and depends on the location of departure and destination. Students may choose their own placement setting (in a school or other institution with charitable status) in agreement with the Volunteering Module Leader and Volunteering Placement Co‐ordinator.

Mandatory

Printing and Binding

We are proud to offer free printing for all students to ensure that printing costs are not a potential financial barrier to student success. The University of Winchester and Winchester Student Union are champions of sustainability and therefore ask that all students consider the environment and print fairly. Students may be required to pay for the costs of dissertation binding. Indicative cost is £1.50-£3.

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards.

Key course details

UCAS code
X3G1
Duration
3 years full-time; 6 years part-time
Typical offer
104-120 points
Location
On campus, Winchester