BA (Hons)

Archaeology

F400

Archaeology examines the physical evidence of past societies to trace the evolution and cultural history of humanity. Ancient landscapes, buildings, artefacts and the people themselves can all reveal a small part of a bigger picture.

Our BA in Archaeology takes you on an immersive and exciting journey through time — from our earliest human ancestors to the industrial age - drawing from subjects within the humanities, and the physical and biological sciences.

Ancient Rome

Course overview

Winchester is home to experienced archaeologists who provide stimulating and engaging teaching materials. In a supportive environment, you learn key fieldwork techniques and undertake rigorous academic training. To make sure you make the most of fieldwork, we have excellent field equipment, including a ground penetrating radar, magnetometers, magnetic susceptibility meters, differential GPS instruments, total stations, and an X-ray fluorescence analyser. In addition, you will learn how to use industry standard computer software such as ArcGIS and Geoplot. Futher, our department has a geoarchaeological consultancy (ARCA), whose staff will also teach you. The consultancy offers valuable laboratory work experience – an opportunity to combine your academic expertise with delivering high-quality commercial solutions. 

Year 1 provides a sound foundation in the theory and practice of archaeology and considers the history of humanity from our earliest ape ancestors to the twentieth century. The year finishes with a four-week excavation in the summer. During Years 2 and 3, you focus on the archaeology of specific periods and/or places while you also undertake a dissertation, for which you are prepared by modules on theory and method, and consider the public role of archaeology. 

Popular Year 2 modules include the Greek World, Early and Later Prehistoric Europe, Archaeology of Roman and Medieval Britain, Human Bioarchaeology, The Archaeology and Anthropology of Death and Burial, The Archaeology of Religion and Ritual, and a multi-day residential fieldtrip module in which you visit sites in another region of Britain. Year 3 modules include Puzzling the Past, Public Archaeology and Careers, The Celts, and The Archaeology of Medieval Religion and Belief, Minoans and Mycenaeans and Battlefield Archaeology. You undertake fieldwork and post-excavation work in Year 2 and may do a further fieldwork module in Year 3. You will pool all your learning in a final-year dissertation.

As we become more attuned to how the past is able to help shape our future, archaeologists are increasingly playing key roles in policy development and decision-making. Graduates enter the archaeological profession and work in museums, heritage organisations, commercial archaeology and local authorities. Others find careers within applied science, for example environmental management, geomatics and remote sensing. 

What you need to know

Course start date

September

Location

Winchester campus

Course length

  • 3 years full-time
  • 6 years part-time

Apply

F400

Typical offer

104-120 points

Fees

From £9,250 pa

Course features

  • Learn from world-leading archaeologists in a stimulating and engaging environment, exploring the rich archaeological heritage of Wessex
  • Use our fully equipped laboratory and the latest industry-standard surveying equipment
  • Take part in our overseas fieldwork projects currently in Germany and the Republic of Georgia
  • Accredited by The Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (CIfA) and University Archaeology UK (UAUK)

Course details

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market. 

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures, practicals (field and class-based) and seminars, the latter in small groups and affording the opportunity to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc., you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 1 (Level 4): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 228 hours
Independent learning: 972 hours

Year 2 (Level 5): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 360 hours
Independent learning: 840 hours

Year 3 (Level 6): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 180 hours
Independent learning: 1020 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course.

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 1 (Level 4)*:

62% coursework
25% written exams
13% practical exams

Year 2 (Level 5)*:

74% coursework
13% written exams
13% practical exams

Year 3 (Level 6)*:

68% coursework
13% written exams
19% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Modules

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing. The University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed. For further information please refer to winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions

Modules

Introduction to Archaeology

This module forms an introduction to the principles and methods upon which the study of archaeology is based. No prior knowledge of the subject is assumed or expected. The philosophical distinctiveness of the subject is outlined, and the various sub-divisions within archaeology (e.g. environmental archaeology, experimental archaeology) are examined. This leads on to an assessment of the methods of establishing chronological sequences in archaeology, and an overview of the methods to be examined in more detail in later modules. These thematic lectures are buttressed by the use of sessions looking at case studies of recent research projects within the Department in order to help draw together and assist understanding of the key themes. Parallel study skills sessions alongside this lecture series allow you to develop quickly the key skills needed in an HE environment.

The Archaeology of the Historic Period

This module provides a brief conspectus of the historical period from the emergence of civilizations through to the present day. The world context is emphasised and the major developments in each period will be explored. The module is illustrated throughout by case studies through which students can appreciate how ideas about these cultures have developed from the beginnings of antiquarian archaeology to the application of modern theory. Key conceptual issues, such as exchange/trade, colonisation, political, religious and social developments, will be explained and discussed in relation to specific examples.

World Prehistory

This module provides an introduction to the development of humans from hominid origins to the writing. Therefore, although the module has a single chronological starting point (c 7.5 my BP), it has a variable end point depending upon the part of the world discussed. The module addresses the main stages of human evolution, starting with the separation of the Hominidae (the human family) from the Pongidae (the apes), then the transition from Australopithecines to Homo and eventually to modern humans. It then examines the origins and development of crucial human processes such as technology, social systems, art, farming and urbanisation, and the significance of their independent invention in different parts of the world. The student will gain a greater awareness of the main sequences of human development on a world scale, and understand how the prehistory of the British Isles is connected to both continental Europe and the wider world.

Introduction to Archaeological Science

This module provides an introduction to methods, theoretical underpinning and application of the biological, Earth and physical sciences in archaeology. It also introduces mathematical concepts that  are of vital importance in using scientific data in archaeology. The module is divided into five parts, comprising: a: methods of age estimation (e.g. chronometric and incremental approaches), b: provenancing studies (e.g. of stone and ceramic artefacts, but also layers on archaeological sites), c: locating archaeological sites (remote sensing), d: palaeoenvironmental reconstruction (e.g. of past vegetation and animals), and d: economic investigation (e.g. subsistence and diet, craft activities). Each theme is explored by first discussing the theoretical basis of approaches that are used, for example introducing uniformitarian concepts when discussing palaeoenvironmental reconstruction examining the range of techniques available, exploring in detail those most frequently used and then discussing how data are interpreted and problems that might result.

Introduction to Archaeological Resources

Students will be introduced to local sources of archaeological and historical information used to explore, evaluate and manage the historic environment. In addition, an introduction to online resources such as the Archaeological Data Service, Historic Environment Records and EDINA will provide students with a sound guide to their use. These resources will be used to review the archaeological potential of specific archaeological sites.

Introduction to Archaeological Fieldwork

This module introduces the different fieldwork techniques available to archaeologists and explores how these techniques are employed during different stages of archaeological fieldwork. The module teaches students how each technique works and provides introductory training on the main equipment used in archaeology. The module explores the current planning process in British commercial archaeology and covers all stages of the process, from desk-based assessments to excavations and archiving. Finally, the module equips students with knowledge on how to prepare for a safe and successful fieldwork project.

Introduction to Material Culture

Archaeologists deal with things. These things (material culture or artefacts) are a way of understanding the lives of the humans who made them. This course presents you with a detailed background to the main categories of material culture that you might encounter on any archaeological sites; these items include: stone tools, pottery, coins, metalwork etc. You will learn about the technology behind these artefacts, and crucially how things that we make do not just have a simple function, but also encode important symbolic information as well. As the majority of archaeological material seen by the public is displayed within museums, you will also consider how material culture is displayed and presented within museums, and the choices made by curators about this. By the end of this course you will look afresh at the way humans make and give meaning to even the most mundane and everyday items.

Study Skills and Research Methods

The module considers means by which students can get the most from classes via note taking and follow-up reading. Assignment structure and how this differs by type is considered, while approaches to research using traditional written and internet sources are also outlined and evaluated. The requirements of and techniques for writing essays, reports and other written assignments are reviewed, and citation and bibliographic skills are developed in practical classes. The importance of illustrations and the use of such media in written assignments, presentations and posters is evaluated, while students’ abilities to present (verbally and in posters) are enhanced in workshops. The final part of the module considers the application of Personal Development Planning (PDP) and Continuing Professional Development (CPD) as means of enabling students to plan and record the skills and experience that they acquire.

Modules

Thinking Through Theory

All humanities subjects are grounded in theory. These bodies of theory may or may not be explicitly stated, but you use them, whether you are aware of them or not. It is easiest to think of theory as the set of tools that you can use to ‘fix’ or understand a problem. This module considers contemporary theory in archaeology, social anthropology and biological anthropology, drawing on areas of social and cultural theory that have been relevant to archaeologists and anthropologists. You will be encouraged to read and discuss a range of key historical texts and case studies will be used to demonstrate how the theories have been applied in recent archaeological or anthropological research. In this way, you will be able to understand the appropriateness of theories which may be relevant to your research interests and to gain a wider appreciation of how we think through problems and issues.

Using Theory and Method

This module encourages you to apply theoretical and methodological approaches in archaeology to your own research design. The module will refer to key theoretical approaches, and will introduce key methods for archaeological and anthropological research. You will explore a range of sources of information, and a variety of methods for gathering data in archaeological research. You will also examine in depth how independent research is designed and carried out, including the process of research design, ethical considerations, methodological choices, data gathering, data analysis and writing. By the end of the module you should have a sound understanding of how archaeological research is designed and carried out in order to apply this to your own research.

Archaeological Fieldwork and Post-Fieldwork Techniques

This is a double module. The module comprises four weeks of archaeological fieldwork, to be undertaken on one of the field projects run by the Department of Archaeology, within which the student might be involved in excavation or other field-based tasks. Students can expect to learn a variety of essential archaeological field skills, depending on the nature of the project they are participating in. These will most commonly include: heavy and light excavation; finds and environmental processing; archaeological recording (written and drawn records); and basic surveying. Students will also learn how archaeological projects are organised in the field and the procedure by which they take place. This will be followed by a 12 week post-excavation course that will explore methods of archive collation and analysis.

Optional Modules
  • Geographic Information Systems - 15 Credits
  • Geomatics and Remote sensing - 15 Credits
  • Human Bioarchaeology - 15 Credits
  • Early Prehistoric Europe - 15 Credits
  • Later Prehistoric Europe - 15 Credits
  • The Greek World - 15 Credits
  • Geoarchaeology - 15 Credits
  • Medieval Archaeology - 15 Credits
  • Archaeology and Anthropology of Death of Burial - 15 Credits
  • Archaeology Field Trip - 15 Credits
  • Community Volunteer Placement - 15 Credits
  • Period Study: An Introduction to the Archaeology of Roman and Medieval Britain - 15 Credits

Optional

Thinking Through Theory

All humanities subjects are grounded in theory. These bodies of theory may or may not be explicitly stated, but you use them, whether you are aware of them or not. It is easiest to think of theory as the set of tools that you can use to ‘fix’ or understand a problem. This module considers contemporary theory in archaeology, social anthropology and biological anthropology, drawing on areas of social and cultural theory that have been relevant to archaeologists and anthropologists. You will be encouraged to read and discuss a range of key historical texts and case studies will be used to demonstrate how the theories have been applied in recent archaeological or anthropological research. In this way, you will be able to understand the appropriateness of theories which may be relevant to your research interests and to gain a wider appreciation of how we think through problems and issues.

Using Theory and Method

This module encourages you to apply theoretical and methodological approaches in archaeology to your own research design. The module will refer to key theoretical approaches, and will introduce key methods for archaeological and anthropological research. You will explore a range of sources of information, and a variety of methods for gathering data in archaeological research. You will also examine in depth how independent research is designed and carried out, including the process of research design, ethical considerations, methodological choices, data gathering, data analysis and writing. By the end of the module you should have a sound understanding of how archaeological research is designed and carried out in order to apply this to your own research.

Archaeological Fieldwork and Post-Fieldwork Techniques

This is a double module. The module comprises four weeks of archaeological fieldwork, to be undertaken on one of the field projects run by the Department of Archaeology, within which the student might be involved in excavation or other field-based tasks. Students can expect to learn a variety of essential archaeological field skills, depending on the nature of the project they are participating in. These will most commonly include: heavy and light excavation; finds and environmental processing; archaeological recording (written and drawn records); and basic surveying. Students will also learn how archaeological projects are organised in the field and the procedure by which they take place. This will be followed by a 12 week post-excavation course that will explore methods of archive collation and analysis.

Optional Modules
  • Geographic Information Systems - 15 Credits
  • Geomatics and Remote sensing - 15 Credits
  • Human Bioarchaeology - 15 Credits
  • Early Prehistoric Europe - 15 Credits
  • Later Prehistoric Europe - 15 Credits
  • The Greek World - 15 Credits
  • Geoarchaeology - 15 Credits
  • Medieval Archaeology - 15 Credits
  • Archaeology and Anthropology of Death of Burial - 15 Credits
  • Archaeology Field Trip - 15 Credits
  • Community Volunteer Placement - 15 Credits
  • Period Study: An Introduction to the Archaeology of Roman and Medieval Britain - 15 Credits

Modules

Extended Independent Study in Archaeology

This double module is a c. 10,000 word dissertation in archaeology for students studying on any of the Archaeology programmes (except BA Ancient, Classical and Medieval Studies). It enables students to apply their knowledge of archaeological theory and practice, in order to produce a piece of independent research which shows clarity of expression, logical argument and creative thought. The dissertation content/subject matter should reflect their chosen Archaeology pathway. This is an Extended Independent Study module.

Public Archaeology and Careers

This module partially integrates two themes: the means and approaches by which the cultural past is considered at different political levels and the career (or further study) that a student will follow once they have graduated. The first part of the module considers global organisation and protection of cultural heritage, i.e. through UNESCO, while considering a number of case studies where such an approach has been successful and unsuccessful. Cultural heritage law and practice are then considered in a number on non-UK jurisdictions (e.g. USA, France and Germany), to provide an indication of varied practice. Focus is thereafter on the UK, and detailed coverage is given to UK cultural heritage law (Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 and the Treasure Act 1996) and guidance (National Planning Policy Framework 2012 revised 2019), before attention is turned to the parties who implement the system (‘curators’ in planning authorities, planning consultants, commercial archaeological units and museums). Evaluating the latter also provides the opportunity to introduce students to careers in the cultural resource management ‘industry’ and further study that would enhance such career possibilities. The careers theme is continued in the second part of the module in which students reflect on the knowledge and skills they have obtained (qualification and memberships too in the case of some students), their aspirations and thus career and further study options. Attention is then turned to applying for jobs and courses of further study, by considering best practice in completing application forms, writing cover ‘letters’ and curricula vitae.

Puzzling the Past

This module, together with the final year project, is the culmination of the Archaeology degree. It provides students the opportunity to consider the multiplicity of archaeological interpretation on the basis of differing lines of evidence and varied approaches of study. Therefore 3-5 archaeological controversies are discussed with the aim of examining how data can be interpreted in various ways, each one of which might be equally valid. Case studies will depend upon staff availability but might include the ‘Younger Fill’/human landscape degradation debate on the interpretation of Late Holocene sediments in the Mediterranean; diffusion models to explain the change from Mesolithic to Neolithic society in Europe; chronologies of colonisation (of for example the Americas and Australia, and of Europe by early forms of Homo and Homo sapiens); origins, causes and effects of diseases in the archaeological and historical record and dating the eruption of Thera and the end of the Minoan civilisation and mid-Holocene vegetation change.

Optional Modules
  • Fieldwork 2 - 15 Credits
  • Archaeological Project Management - 15 Credits
  • The Celts - 15 Credits
  • Later Prehistoric Wessex - 15 Credits
  • The Archaeology of Winchester - 15 Credits
  • Caribbean Peoples and Cultures - 15 Credits
  • Archaeology of Buddhism - 15 Credits
  • The Archaeology of the Southern Caucasus - 15 Credits
  • Medieval Religion and Belief - 15 Credits
  • Battlefield Archaeology - 15 Credits
  • Minoans and Mycenaeans: The Greek Bronze Age - 15 Credits
  • The Archaeology of Conflict - 15 Credits

Optional

Extended Independent Study in Archaeology

This double module is a c. 10,000 word dissertation in archaeology for students studying on any of the Archaeology programmes (except BA Ancient, Classical and Medieval Studies). It enables students to apply their knowledge of archaeological theory and practice, in order to produce a piece of independent research which shows clarity of expression, logical argument and creative thought. The dissertation content/subject matter should reflect their chosen Archaeology pathway. This is an Extended Independent Study module.

Public Archaeology and Careers

This module partially integrates two themes: the means and approaches by which the cultural past is considered at different political levels and the career (or further study) that a student will follow once they have graduated. The first part of the module considers global organisation and protection of cultural heritage, i.e. through UNESCO, while considering a number of case studies where such an approach has been successful and unsuccessful. Cultural heritage law and practice are then considered in a number on non-UK jurisdictions (e.g. USA, France and Germany), to provide an indication of varied practice. Focus is thereafter on the UK, and detailed coverage is given to UK cultural heritage law (Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 and the Treasure Act 1996) and guidance (National Planning Policy Framework 2012 revised 2019), before attention is turned to the parties who implement the system (‘curators’ in planning authorities, planning consultants, commercial archaeological units and museums). Evaluating the latter also provides the opportunity to introduce students to careers in the cultural resource management ‘industry’ and further study that would enhance such career possibilities. The careers theme is continued in the second part of the module in which students reflect on the knowledge and skills they have obtained (qualification and memberships too in the case of some students), their aspirations and thus career and further study options. Attention is then turned to applying for jobs and courses of further study, by considering best practice in completing application forms, writing cover ‘letters’ and curricula vitae.

Puzzling the Past

This module, together with the final year project, is the culmination of the Archaeology degree. It provides students the opportunity to consider the multiplicity of archaeological interpretation on the basis of differing lines of evidence and varied approaches of study. Therefore 3-5 archaeological controversies are discussed with the aim of examining how data can be interpreted in various ways, each one of which might be equally valid. Case studies will depend upon staff availability but might include the ‘Younger Fill’/human landscape degradation debate on the interpretation of Late Holocene sediments in the Mediterranean; diffusion models to explain the change from Mesolithic to Neolithic society in Europe; chronologies of colonisation (of for example the Americas and Australia, and of Europe by early forms of Homo and Homo sapiens); origins, causes and effects of diseases in the archaeological and historical record and dating the eruption of Thera and the end of the Minoan civilisation and mid-Holocene vegetation change.

Optional Modules
  • Fieldwork 2 - 15 Credits
  • Archaeological Project Management - 15 Credits
  • The Celts - 15 Credits
  • Later Prehistoric Wessex - 15 Credits
  • The Archaeology of Winchester - 15 Credits
  • Caribbean Peoples and Cultures - 15 Credits
  • Archaeology of Buddhism - 15 Credits
  • The Archaeology of the Southern Caucasus - 15 Credits
  • Medieval Religion and Belief - 15 Credits
  • Battlefield Archaeology - 15 Credits
  • Minoans and Mycenaeans: The Greek Bronze Age - 15 Credits
  • The Archaeology of Conflict - 15 Credits

Entry requirements

104-120 points

Our offers are typically made using UCAS tariff points to allow you to include a range of level 3 qualifications and as a guide, the requirements for this course are equivalent to:

  • A-Levels: BCC-BBB from 3 A Levels or equivalent grade combinations (e.g. BBB is comparable to ABC in terms of tariff points)
  • BTEC/CTEC: DMM from BTEC or Cambridge Technical (CTEC) qualifications
  • International Baccalaureate: To include a minimum of 2 Higher Level certificates at grade H4
  • T Level: Merit in a T Level

Additionally, we accept tariff points achieved for many other qualifications, such as the Access to Higher Education Diploma, Scottish Highers, UAL Diploma/Extended Diploma and WJEC Applied Certificate/Diploma, to name a few. We also accept tariff points from smaller level 3 qualifications, up to a maximum of 32, from qualifications like the Extended Project (EP/EPQ), music or dance qualifications. To find out more about UCAS tariff points, including what your qualifications are worth, please visit UCAS.

In addition to level 3 study, the following GCSE’s are required:

GCSE English Language at grade 4 or C, or higher. Functional Skills at level 2 is accepted as an alternative, however Key Skills qualifications are not. If you hold another qualification, please get in touch and we will advise further.

If you will be over the age of 21 years of age at the beginning of your undergraduate study, you will be considered as a mature student. This means our offer may be different and any work or life experiences you have will be considered together with any qualifications you hold. UCAS have further information about studying as a mature student on their website which may be of interest.

If English is not your first language, a formal English language test will most likely be required and you will need to achieve the following:

  • IELTS Academic at 5.5 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in all four components (for year 1 entry)
  • We also accept other English language qualifications, such as IELTS Indicator, Pearson PTE Academic, Cambridge C1 Advanced and TOEFL iBT.

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by contacting our International Recruitment Team via our International Apply Pages.

2024 Course Tuition Fees

  UK / Channel Islands /
Isle of Man / Republic of Ireland 

International

Year 1 £9,250 £16,700
Year 2 £9,250 £16,700
Year 3 £9,250 £16,700
Total £27,750 £50,100
Optional Sandwich Year* £1,850 £3,340
Total with Sandwich Year £29,600 £53,440

Additional tuition fee information

If you are a UK student starting your degree in September 2024, the first year will cost you £9,250**. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK students.

Remember, you don’t have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year.

UK Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £139.14 and a 15 credit module is £2,087.

* Please note that not all courses offer an optional sandwich year.

**The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year.

Additional costs

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Mandatory

Excavation
Students are required to undertake four weeks compulsory fieldwork which takes place over the summer after Year 1, normally at one of the Department's local research/ training projects. These local projects have no direct costs for student participants, but students may need to pay for their travel.

Printing and Binding
The University is pleased to offer our students a printing allowance of £5 each academic year. This will print around 125 A4 (black and white) pages. If students wish to print more, printer credit can be topped up by the student. The University and Student Union are champions of sustainability and we ask all our students to consider the environmental impact before printing.

Optional

Further Fieldwork
Students may opt to undertake a further four weeks' archaeological fieldwork in the summer after Year 2. Local projects have no direct costs for student participants, but students may need to pay for their travel. Students who opt to join non-local projects may have to cover project-specific costs. At the highest end of this spectrum is the project in Georgia (indicative cost is £1500 for four weeks) where the costs include flights, food and accommodation for the duration of the project. Indicative cost: £0-£1500
Field trip module
Students will have the option to participate in a three day-long residential field trip module in their second year of study. Indicative cost: £150.

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards section.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Graduates from the programme are well equipped to enter the archaeological or heritage profession via a career in museums, heritage organisations, commercial archaeology or local authorities.

The University of Winchester ranks in the top 10 in the UK for graduates in employment or further study according to the Graduate Outcomes Survey 2023, HESA.

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree. 

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