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COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Learn from staff with extensive industry experience as you engage with real-world PR projects
  • Develop as a critical thinker and master the art of how to communicate effectively and creatively across multiple platforms
  • Choose from a broad range of teaching content allowing you to explore various career pathways in public relations, journalism and media communications
  • Use the Work Placement module to gain experience in an office environment relevant to your career aspirations
  • Produce your own media content in our Multimedia Centre’s outstanding industry-standard facilities, including two HD TV studios with green screens, a newsroom, and a computerised radio studio

Are you ready to make a lasting impression? As a public relations executive you’ll need to know how to manage the reputations of people, products and organisations effectively by telling the right stories on the right platforms at the right time.

Our Public Relations and Journalism degree is designed to help you do just that by developing quality critical and creative expertise in public relations. You’ll learn to manage communications and implement a wide range of public relations initiatives using traditional and digital tools. Whether you’re exploring an individual or collaborative approach you’ll be closely supported by academic and industry professionals.

This dynamic three-year programme of study combines the analytical and practical elements of 21st-century public relations. You will learn about the PR industry and its connections to the media; its history and development within the digital media landscape, and the powerful role it plays in areas as diverse as marketing, celebrity culture, and political communications. Alongside this, you will have the opportunity to gain an insight into the skills required to produce media content using industry-standard facilities.

As well as innovative practical workshops and work placements, you will explore a range of digital, physical and online resources to support your in-class teachings and creative projects, and have the opportunity to work to real-world briefs.

Year 1 develops your core academic skills and introduces you to journalism and Key Concepts in Media and Communication. Practical modules enhance your Media Skills and there are modules on Design Thinking and Persuasive Writing.

In Year 2, you study journalism in more depth, including its relationship with digital and social media. You also take specialist modules exploring Professional Media Writing; Social Media, Advertising and Branding, and Podcasting. A range of optional modules include Exploring Media Theory and Feature Writing. The second-year Work Placement module allows you to go beyond the lecture theatre to work in a PR setting where you can gain valuable experience and apply your learning in a real office environment.

In the final year, you take a module in documentary and photojournalism, update your knowledge of media law and study a module designed to provide insight on communications in the political arena. For the Extended Independent Study, you can produce a portfolio of articles, a more practical media project or undertake a conventional dissertation on any aspect of the programme that interests you. Optional modules include Community Media, Business Storytelling and Celebrity Culture.

Studying Public Relations and Journalism at Winchester is an excellent preparation for a successful career in PR and the media. Our up-to-date course content ensures you have the relevant critical and practical skills to succeed in the modern workplace.

Graduates can expect to find work in the creative industries, PR consultancy, in-house public relations, business-to-business, journalism, marketing and communications, fashion and celebrity industry, the third sector, and political communications.

Careers

BA (Hons) Public Relations and Journalism supports a broad range of employment opportunities. For example, working in the creative industries,  PR consultancy, in-house public relations, business-to-business, journalism, marketing and communications, fashion celebrity industry, the third sector, and political communication. Our Work Placement module will provide you with experience in public relations, or in other environments relevant to your career aspirations. The programme will also enhance key flexible skills that support a route into a wide range of careers in wider communication work, HR business, education, management and public service.

94% of our 2016/17 graduates (first degree and other undergraduate courses) were in employment and/or further study six months after completing their course (Destination of Leavers from Higher Education survey).

The Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) record collects information about what those completing university go on to do six months after graduation. The Careers Service undertakes DLHE on an annual basis through surveys and a data collection process. DLHE is designed and strictly controlled by HESA.

Pre-approved for a Masters

University of Winchester students studying Bachelor Honours degrees are pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible students must apply by the end of March in their final year and meet the entry requirements of their chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Work placements

Students have the opportunity to undertake work placements to gain work experience.

Learning and teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market. 

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc.), you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 1 (Level 4): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 240 hours
  • Independent learning: 960 hours
Year 2 (Level 5): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 216 hours
  • Independent learning: 936 hours
  • Placement: 48 hours
Year 3 (Level 6): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 168 hours
  • Independent learning: 1032 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course. 

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

The University library is open seven days a week, 24 hours a day.

Assessments

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 1 (Level 4)*:
  • 86% coursework
  • 13% written exams
  • 1% practical exams
Year 2 (Level 5)*:
  • 99% coursework
  • 0% written exams
  • 1% practical exams
Year 3 (Level 6)*:
  • 91% coursework
  • 8% written exams
  • 1% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2020 Entry: 104-120 points
2021 Entry: 104-120 points

A GCSE A*-C or 9-4 pass in English Language is required.

International Baccalaureate: 104-120 points to include a minimum of 2 Higher level IB certificates at grade 4 or above.

If English is not your first language: IELTS 6.0 (including 5.5 in writing) or equivalent.

Course Enquiries and Applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234

Send us a message

International Students

International students seeking additional information about this programme can send an email to International@winchester.ac.uk or call +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Days

Year 1 (Level 4)

Modules Credits

Media Law 15

The media law module covers the basic curriculum of practical legal knowledge required by professional journalists. Topics covered include libel, contempt of court, copyright, and privacy. The module also covers the regulatory framework in which UK journalism, emphasising practical application through field trips to courts and the local authorities.

Introduction to Journalism 30

This module provides an introduction to the media industries and the role of journalism in providing valuable commercial content for these businesses. At the same time it allows the student to amass certain preparatory skills and familiarity with media production systems and equipment. There are two main objectives for this module: for students to produce a short feature based on a journalistic organisation; and secondly to master the basics of news writing.

Radio Production and Presentation 15

This module builds on the introductory module in semester one and moves on to establish a routine of weekly news reporting resulting as solo audio packages mixing reportage and script reading with interviews and other gathered sound material.

Introduction to Digital Publishing Skills 15

In this module students will be introduced to the essentials of digital publishing. Gaining a solid understanding of the basics of using programs from the Adobe Creative Cloud suite (Photoshop, InDesign and Illustrator) students will develop skills in graphic design, publishing software, and knowledge of the industry.

Introduction to Public Relations and Business Communications 15

This module will explore the relationships between the functions of corporate relations, media relations, and public relations opening career opportunities for these skill sets upon which those three functions converge. Students will first research into the various ways in which global corporations have presented themselves to the world (through public relations, advertising, marketing, strategizing etc.) with a view to better understanding how public relations has become a key element of how these corporations establish themselves. The students will then move to carrying out their own research into businesses of different sizes, so as to gain sufficient detailed knowledge to be able to start fashioning their own writing about these in an attempt to bolster, improve, or embellish their wider identities to consumers and the public at large.

Persuasive Writing 15

This module is designed as an introduction for students into the various techniques and strategies of rhetorical writing. It will begin by looking at examples of rhetorical writing from past and present, with an intention to examine and analyse how they work and what they are trying to achieve. Students will then explore how best to develop specific pieces of writing that are intended to persuade, cajole, and seduce the reader for particular reasons and in order to achieve specific effects. The intention all the while is for their writing to be professional, polished, and always suitable to the subject matter.

Professional Writing 1: Editing and Proofreading 15

This module is designed as the first opportunity for students to develop writing skills in relation to specific professional contexts. Students will be encouraged to work on skills such as gathering information/note-taking, as well as basic editing and proofreading skills, in relation to specific professional writing tasks, and to think through the stages of writing development and refinement. They will consider what the label ‘professional’ means in relation to different forms of writing, and how writers can use their writing skills in work-related environments.

Year 2 (Level 5)

Modules Credits

Media Writing 15

This module will see students developing their own media writing skills within the context of a wider consideration and understanding of the structures and constraints imposed by various media institutions, discourses and forms. This will include (but not be confined to) issues related to writing for radio and television presentation, celebrity magazines and newspapers, and blogs and websites.

Students will be required to develop and explore their own particular writing interests in relation to specific forms and media. This will not involve a focus on developing professional skills in journalism, but will be more concerned with how students’ creative writing evolves and is reshaped in relation to a variety of contexts and audiences. There will, however, be a need to engage in the critical debates around media representation and delivery, and the institutional practices that writers sometimes find themselves responding to. Students will need to look at a wide range of media products, and to consider the varying potential and possibility for writing on various topics.

Journalism: Digital and Social Media 15

This module explores the role and impact of social media in democratic and non-democratic societies and the role and impact of digital media in journalistic practices and organizations.

Analysing Journalism 15

This module will provide students with the opportunity to draw upon a range of academic perspectives and critical research to explore the pressures, tensions and opportunities inherent in news production, feature writing and fashion journalism. It will identify some debates central to the discipline of journalism studies and give you opportunities to critically evaluate these in the light of your own research and your own experience.

Copywriting 15

This module allows students to engage with a range of copywriting tasks within a variety of copywriting contexts. They will develop their own writing skills in this area in relation to specific tasks (advertising, marketing etc.) but only after they have gained knowledge of the ways/conditions in which copywriters work and the role they play within a creative team. Students will research into a variety of examples of successful copywriting (both past and present) and examine the reasons for this success – both in terms of the text itself and also the ways in which it tapped into a specific audience at a specific moment in time.

Advertising and Branding: History and Theory 15

This module will offer students a critical approach to studying advertising and branding. It will encourage students to position advertising and branding texts and practices within cultural, political, historical and economic frameworks. The module will consider the cultural history of the advertising industry as well as the development of particular professional discourses, such as lifestyling and audience positioning. The module will consider different approaches branding, such as pitching and targeting towards audiences, and to the analysis of advertising texts, such as semiotics, quantitative analysis and ethnographic research. The module enables students to test out their skills through specific class-based exercises. Attention will be paid to the production of advertising and branding strategies within different media forms and students will be encouraged to consider these in relation to the specificity of their cultural and historical contexts.

Optional modules
  • Speechwriting - 15 credits
  • Social Media, Advertising and Branding - 15 credits
  • Volunteering for Public Relations and Journalism - 15 credits
  • Work Placement - 15 credits
  • Value Studies Module - 15 Credits

Optional Credits

Media Writing 15

This module will see students developing their own media writing skills within the context of a wider consideration and understanding of the structures and constraints imposed by various media institutions, discourses and forms. This will include (but not be confined to) issues related to writing for radio and television presentation, celebrity magazines and newspapers, and blogs and websites.

Students will be required to develop and explore their own particular writing interests in relation to specific forms and media. This will not involve a focus on developing professional skills in journalism, but will be more concerned with how students’ creative writing evolves and is reshaped in relation to a variety of contexts and audiences. There will, however, be a need to engage in the critical debates around media representation and delivery, and the institutional practices that writers sometimes find themselves responding to. Students will need to look at a wide range of media products, and to consider the varying potential and possibility for writing on various topics.

Journalism: Digital and Social Media 15

This module explores the role and impact of social media in democratic and non-democratic societies and the role and impact of digital media in journalistic practices and organizations.

Analysing Journalism 15

This module will provide students with the opportunity to draw upon a range of academic perspectives and critical research to explore the pressures, tensions and opportunities inherent in news production, feature writing and fashion journalism. It will identify some debates central to the discipline of journalism studies and give you opportunities to critically evaluate these in the light of your own research and your own experience.

Copywriting 15

This module allows students to engage with a range of copywriting tasks within a variety of copywriting contexts. They will develop their own writing skills in this area in relation to specific tasks (advertising, marketing etc.) but only after they have gained knowledge of the ways/conditions in which copywriters work and the role they play within a creative team. Students will research into a variety of examples of successful copywriting (both past and present) and examine the reasons for this success – both in terms of the text itself and also the ways in which it tapped into a specific audience at a specific moment in time.

Advertising and Branding: History and Theory 15

This module will offer students a critical approach to studying advertising and branding. It will encourage students to position advertising and branding texts and practices within cultural, political, historical and economic frameworks. The module will consider the cultural history of the advertising industry as well as the development of particular professional discourses, such as lifestyling and audience positioning. The module will consider different approaches branding, such as pitching and targeting towards audiences, and to the analysis of advertising texts, such as semiotics, quantitative analysis and ethnographic research. The module enables students to test out their skills through specific class-based exercises. Attention will be paid to the production of advertising and branding strategies within different media forms and students will be encouraged to consider these in relation to the specificity of their cultural and historical contexts.

Optional modules
  • Speechwriting - 15 credits
  • Social Media, Advertising and Branding - 15 credits
  • Volunteering for Public Relations and Journalism - 15 credits
  • Work Placement - 15 credits
  • Value Studies Module - 15 Credits

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

Major Project in Public Relations and Journalism 60

For this major project, students must submit a portfolio consisting of:

  • a piece/portfolio of PR work or journalism c. 15,000 words or equivalent
  • a supporting rationale/contextualisation of c. 2000 words
  • a supporting bibliography

Study and writing is primarily student-directed, with supervision supplied by tutors teaching/researching in the area of PR and Journalism.

Publishing III: Small Press Publication 15

This module is the third of three ‘publishing’ modules across the course of the programme, and in this case students will work together as a publishing team contributing to the production of a small-press publication. As such they will work through the various stages of submission, reader evaluation, editing, proofing, layout design, and eventual printing and publication. They will also work on creating a strategy for maximising the readership of said publications. By the end of the process students will have utilised a significant number of publishing skills, widened their understanding of the practicalities of publishing, as well as broadened their knowledge of the publishing industry per se.

Business Storytelling 15

This module centres on an area of growing contemporary interest in the business world – the use of storytelling as part of establishing and furthering corporate identities. Students will first research into the various ways in which global corporations have presented themselves to the world (advertising, marketing, strategizing etc.) with a view to better understanding how writing, and in particular storytelling, has become a key element of how these corporations establish themselves. The students will then move to carrying out their own research into businesses of different sizes, so as to gain sufficient detailed knowledge to be able to start fashioning their own stories about these in an attempt to bolster, improve, or embellish their wider identities to consumers and the public at large.

Media Law update 15

This module supplements the study of principles and statutes developed at Level Four with the analysis of current cases and recent precedents both in the courts and in the findings of key regulatory bodies such as OFCOM. It will provide you with the skills to continually update your knowledge throughout your career through the examination of cases in this rapidly changing field.

Optional modules
  • Big Data and Algorithmic Cultures - 15 credits
  • Working in Digital Journalism - 15 credits
  • Community Media - 15 Credits
  • Climate Crisis and the Media - 15 credits
  • Value Studies Module - 15 Credits

Optional Credits

Major Project in Public Relations and Journalism 60

For this major project, students must submit a portfolio consisting of:

  • a piece/portfolio of PR work or journalism c. 15,000 words or equivalent
  • a supporting rationale/contextualisation of c. 2000 words
  • a supporting bibliography

Study and writing is primarily student-directed, with supervision supplied by tutors teaching/researching in the area of PR and Journalism.

Publishing III: Small Press Publication 15

This module is the third of three ‘publishing’ modules across the course of the programme, and in this case students will work together as a publishing team contributing to the production of a small-press publication. As such they will work through the various stages of submission, reader evaluation, editing, proofing, layout design, and eventual printing and publication. They will also work on creating a strategy for maximising the readership of said publications. By the end of the process students will have utilised a significant number of publishing skills, widened their understanding of the practicalities of publishing, as well as broadened their knowledge of the publishing industry per se.

Business Storytelling 15

This module centres on an area of growing contemporary interest in the business world – the use of storytelling as part of establishing and furthering corporate identities. Students will first research into the various ways in which global corporations have presented themselves to the world (advertising, marketing, strategizing etc.) with a view to better understanding how writing, and in particular storytelling, has become a key element of how these corporations establish themselves. The students will then move to carrying out their own research into businesses of different sizes, so as to gain sufficient detailed knowledge to be able to start fashioning their own stories about these in an attempt to bolster, improve, or embellish their wider identities to consumers and the public at large.

Media Law update 15

This module supplements the study of principles and statutes developed at Level Four with the analysis of current cases and recent precedents both in the courts and in the findings of key regulatory bodies such as OFCOM. It will provide you with the skills to continually update your knowledge throughout your career through the examination of cases in this rapidly changing field.

Optional modules
  • Big Data and Algorithmic Cultures - 15 credits
  • Working in Digital Journalism - 15 credits
  • Community Media - 15 Credits
  • Climate Crisis and the Media - 15 credits
  • Value Studies Module - 15 Credits

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2020 Course Tuition Fees

 UK/EU

International

Year 1 £9,250 £13,500
Year 2 £9,250 £13,500
Year 3 £9,250 £13,500
Total £27,750 £40,500
Optional Sandwich Year £700 £700
Total with Sandwich Year £28,450 £41,200

If you are a UK or EU student starting your degree in September 2020, the first year will cost you £9,250*. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK and EU students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK/EU Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £112.50 and a 15 credit module is £1,687.

*The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year. 

Additional Costs

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Optional

Core texts: Core Texts are available from the University Library; however we strongly recommend student's purchase their own books. Students can find hard copies/e-copies of these books in the library. Indicative cost is £30-£200 per academic year.

Mandatory

Core texts: Students are required to purchase two books.

  • Essential English for Journalists, Editors and Writers by Harold Evans
  • McNae's Essential Law for Journalists by Mark Hanna and Mike Dodd

Indicative cost is £40. 

Printing and Binding: We are proud to offer free printing for all students to ensure that printing costs are not a potential financial barrier to student success. The University of Winchester and Winchester Student Union are champions of sustainability and therefore ask that all students consider the environment and print fairly. Students may be required to pay for the costs of dissertation binding. Indicative cost is £1.50-£3.

Course specific bursaries/scholarships

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards page.

Key course details

UCAS code
P250
Duration
3 years full-time
Typical offer
104-120 points
Location
On campus, Winchester