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COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Learn from a specialist team of research-active academics who work at the forefront of this exciting field
  • Work on practical exercises and projects using a wide range of specialist software and tools including dedicated computer science and cyber security laboratories in a state-of-the-art new development (from 2019).
  • Develop an appreciation of the wider role Artificial Intelligence plays in an organisational context
  • Explore a multi-disciplinary perspective on the subject of Artificial Intelligence giving you an excellent basis for a future career in the field

Artificial intelligence (AI) has arrived, but are you ready for it? As AI shifts from the lab to the workplace and into our homes, it is having an increasingly profound impact on the world around us.

On our innovative Computer Science with Artificial Intelligence degree you venture into one of the most exciting fields of technological development of our times placing you at the forefront of the accelerating artificial-intelligence race.

Artificial intelligence is the attempt to build artificial systems that have intelligent behaviour. Applications of AI range from ‘smart’ controllers for household devices to computers that can converse in English, play games, conduct intelligent web searches or act as the brain of a robot.

Your overarching goal on our three-year programme is to develop the skills to implement solutions to complex problems. You do this by learning the fundamentals of computer science juxtaposed with a broad range of AI techniques, including neural networks and evolutionary algorithms.

The course draws on the fields of law, philosophy and psychology to deliver a truly interdisciplinary experience. You benefit from a team of experts in these fields as well as from specialists in Digital Media (Virtual Reality/Augmented Reality). In addition, you reap the rewards of ongoing research and knowledge exchange activities in AI, law, ethics and big data at the Centre for Information Rights (CIR).

As well as fundamental computer science classes and laboratory work, you cover topics such as expert systems, intelligent agents, the history and philosophy of artificial intelligence, machine learning, computer vision, heuristic optimisation and other intelligent systems.

You will enhance your knowledge of various computing disciplines and skills including software development, database analysis, AI programming, machine learning and data structures. And you will have access to specialist facilities including well-equipped labs containing Linux and Microsoft platforms.

In Year 1, you are introduced to the key concepts and tools underpinning modern computer science with artificial intelligence. You learn how to program in Java, study the architecture and applications of computer systems and explore areas of AI. You also take an Introduction to Academic Studies module while developing your personal and professional skills.

This course shares a common first year with our Computer Science degree, giving you the flexibility to switch easily between courses if you choose.

In Year 2 you explore the latest developments in AI and programming together with modules in related topics such as cyber security. Other optional modules may include Servers, Data Centres and Smart Systems, and Software Testing.

An optional placement year gives you the opportunity to enhance your employability, business understanding and professional skills.

In Year 3 you develop an appreciation of the legal, ethical and regulatory frameworks together with the human aspects of information security assurance and forensic investigation. There are modules on Advanced Software Development and Machine Learning and Robotics. The Dissertation module helps you to develop specialist skills and expertise through the undertaking of a substantial body of work. You learn how to successfully present your evidence in written format and orally. Optional modules in your final year may include Distributed Systems, Cloud Computing Infrastructures, and Information Futures.

The programme has a modular structure and learning outcomes and assessments are clearly defined for each module.

Advanced computing skills and knowledge are highly valued in many sectors. Your degree also provides skills in flexibility, critical thinking, problem solving and attention to detail.

Careers

On graduation, you will be equipped to enter a variety of computer science and AI graduate roles including graduate artificial intelligence engineer and data scientist. 

94% of our 2016/17 graduates (first degree and other undergraduate courses) were in employment and/or further study six months after completing their course (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey).

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market.

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc., you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

YEAR 1 (LEVEL 4): TIMETABLED TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITY*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 288 hours
  • Independent learning: 912 hours
YEAR 2 (LEVEL 5): TIMETABLED TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITY*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 252 hours
  • Independent learning: 948 hours
YEAR 3 (LEVEL 6): TIMETABLED TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITY*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 180 hours
  • Independent learning: 1020 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course. 

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester.

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

The University library is open seven days a week, 24 hours a day.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

YEAR 1 (LEVEL 4)*:
  • 75% coursework
  • 25% written exams
  • 0% practical exams
YEAR 2 (LEVEL 5)*:
  • 80% coursework
  • 13% written exams
  • 7% practical exams
YEAR 3 (LEVEL 6)*:
  • 62% coursework
  • 38% written exams
  • 0% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2020 Entry: 104-112 points

A GCSE A*-C or 9-4 pass in Maths and English is required.

International Baccalaureate: 104-112 points to include a minimum of 2 Higher level IB certificates at grade 4 or above.

If English is not your first language: IELTS 6.0 overall with a minimum of 5.5 writing or equivalent

Course enquires and applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234

Send us a message

International students

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by emailing our International Recruitment Team at International@winchester.ac.uk or calling +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Days.

Year 1 (Level 4)

Modules Credits

Business Expertise 1 15

The aim of this module is to develop student understanding of the skills and competencies required in both academic and professional environments. Students will work individually and in teams to develop the knowledge and skills required to plan, design and conduct a research project.  Students will have the opportunity to engage in a range of activities which will build industry awareness at a national and international level; enhance communication and negotiation skills; and increase awareness of the importance of evidence based thinking and reflective practice.  This module provides the foundation for continuing personal and professional development building confidence to provide students with the potential to maximise academic and career aspirations.

Information Systems and Organisations 15

The aim of the module is to introduce the application of information, information systems and information technologies within organisations and understand the impact of such systems on organisational performance. Students will develop an understanding of the project lifecycle focussing on the importance of the customer and will look at the process involved in creating information systems by learning how to investigate and define customer requirements and understand future needs. Undertaking this module gives students an introduction to information systems and organisations, giving them the skills to work effectively within an IS organisation on projects and giving them the base for understanding other IS modules within the degree programme.

Introduction to Software Development 15

This module will introduce technical students to programming and testing concepts. Students will develop an understanding of the general principles of how programs and projects are delivered within the IT services industry and the application of the concepts of testing and programming. The module will develop introductory skills using a specific but not defined programming language and platform. Undertaking the module will develop the student’s skills in developing and testing programmes using industry techniques.

Innovative Systems 15

Using inspirational demonstrators from both academia and industry, this module provides an overview of a range of innovative systems and applications in the fields of computer science, cyber security, psychology, social sciences, digital media and business decision making.  It will also facilitate hands-on experience on the choices and applications of innovative systems to interdisciplinary fields.  This module is suitable for students from technical programmes and from psychology, business, digital media and social sciences.

Introduction to Cyber Security and Networks 15

The aim of this module is to introduce concepts of IT security in order to understand the security threats to an IT system and the operational impact of these threats on an organisation. The module will explore different protection methods for data and develop knowledge of security policies and procedures, including risk assessments, and how these procedures can be implemented and maintained. This module will introduce topical case studies of attacks on organisational information systems, highlighting the business consequences.

System and Software Analysis and Design 15

This module will teach the design concepts of object orientated programming and creativity and ideation techniques.  This module will develop the student’s skills in analysing business and technical requirements to select and specify appropriate technology solutions; capturing client requirements and producing the solutions architecture and software design. Systems Development: The concept will be tested with reference to the business case.

Data Structures and Operating Systems 15

This module imparts an understanding of operating systems including concepts such as scheduling, concurrency and synchronisation, memory management, input and output systems, kernel security and file systems. Fundamentals of data structures and core algorithms and analysis are also explored.

Database Analysis and Design 15

This module imparts an understanding of analysis and design concepts that are essential for developing and implementing software and database systems.  Design concepts and procedures such as Business Rules, Requirements Analysis, Data Modelling, Relational Data Modelling, Object Orientated Analysis and SQL will be explored.  Students will also learn how to apply Unified Modelling Language (UML) within different computing scenarios.

Year 2 (Level 5)

Modules Credits

Software Development and Testing 30

This module builds on the progress made during the first year software development modules. It will focus on the principles of object-oriented software development and also how to test these types of applications.  By the end of this year long module, students will be expected to understand the three pillars of object-oriented design and the 7 principles of software testing. Students will produce a solution based on a design which will be developed within the module, paying particular attention to effective and good quality software programming. The module will present a systematic approach to both the development process and testing applications. In addition, students will be investigating the need to produce inclusive interfaces and ensure that they follow guidelines to support the development of interaction with their system.

Artificial Intelligence 15

This module introduces the field of artificial intelligence and the fundamental concepts and techniques in the areas of problem solving, knowledge representation and machine learning.  Agents, Search, Planning, Knowledge Representation and Bayesian Artificial Intelligence are explored.

Intelligence and Adaptive Behaviour 30

This module develops knowledge in artificial life and ‘human-made’ systems by applying a multidisciplinary understanding of biological evolution (e.g. reproduction, mutation, recombination and selection) to evolutionary algorithms techniques. Consideration is given to human computer interaction in the context of robotics and complex systems including the functions of vision, image structure, object recognition and active vision and perception. The module emphasises practical techniques through the introduction to suitable software packages.

Object Orientated Software Development 15

The module develops theoretical and practical skills in software engineering principles including abstraction, encapsulation, aggregation and inheritance. You will learn the processes from analysis to design, implementation, testing and documentation together with software quality principles.

Integrated Project 15

This module provides an opportunity for you to work as part of a collaborative team to manage and complete a substantial project for a given scenario. You are expected to utilise and extend the knowledge and understanding imparted previously and contextualise the material already covered.

Risk Management and Cyber Security 15

The aim of this module is to further develop student understanding of IS Security.  The main focus of this module will be to explore key themes, trends and issues in cyber-security, policing and governance of the internet and business vulnerabilities.  The module provides students with an opportunity to analyse risk management, information risk assessment, risk mitigation, management standards and methodologies, implementing a risk management strategy and business continuity planning.

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

Information Systems Futures 15

Information Systems Futures evaluates contemporary issues in a rapidly changing information systems environment, as applied to businesses and their stakeholders. The module will focus upon in-depth studies of a number of recent, emerging or potential developments in information systems management – in both theoretical and practice driven terms. In-depth studies involve the evaluation of distinctive digital and online activities, especially as they relate to the creation of new forms of transaction, business models and markets. It will also evaluate the nature, growth and impact of virtual communities and the relationships that form and develop in those communities. The module will investigate a number of topical theoretical issues and practical developments that link technologies to information systems developments.

Advanced Artificial Intelligence 30

This module develops advanced knowledge and skills in the core fields of artificial intelligence including machine learning, neural networks, data mining and cognitive science. Drawing upon multiple disciplines including psychology and biology, an in-depth multidimensional understanding of AI is imparted.  The practical basis of how learning algorithms can be applied is covered through hands-on practical work.  Theories of cognitive science and neuroscience are explored in depth and consideration is given to human information processing, knowledge and reasoning.

Cyber Law and the Regulation of the Information Society 15

This module will examine the emerging trends that signify the formation of the information society and also its relationship with law, technology, and public policy. This module will cover UK and European Union law along with a variety of international regulatory perspectives that seek to harmonise law. The module will analyse the many legal and regulatory challenges that the information society generates for society, particularly with regard to privacy, the creation of products, the media. Particular focus will be upon whether these challenges can be best resolved by law or some other means, for example, technology, education or simple market forces.

Advanced Software Development 30

The overall aim of this module is to introduce you to a range of advanced, near-research level topics in contemporary software development. The module considers issues from a technology-driven perspective and a user-driven perspective. You will develop advanced skills in modern software development languages and methodologies such as Java, Swift, C# and C++. and Agile The practical activities of this module are fundamental to build sufficient skills and confidence to approach the Synoptic Project.

Computing Project 30

The Computing Project provides the opportunity to undertake a major computing related problem in an approved topic area relevant to the programme of study.

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2019 Course Tuition Fees* 

 UK/EU

International

Year 1 £9,250 £13,300
Year 2 £9,250 £13,300
Year 3 £9,250 £13,300
Total £27,750 £39,900
Optional Sandwich Year £700 £700
Total with Sandwich Year £28,450 £40,600

If you are a UK or EU student starting your degree in September 2019, the first year will cost you £9,250*. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK and EU students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK/EU Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,938.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £110.83 and a 15 credit module is £1,662.

*The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year. 

ADDITIONAL COSTS

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Optional

Core texts: Core texts are available from the University Library. However some students prefer to purchase their own copies. Some core texts can be bought second-hand or as an ebook which can often reduce this cost. Indicative cost is £150 for whole course.

Mandatory

Laptop: Students are expected to have their own laptop to use on this course. Indicative cost is £200-£1,000.

Printing and Binding: We are proud to offer free printing for all students to ensure that printing costs are not a potential financial barrier to student success. The University of Winchester and Winchester Student Union are champions of sustainability and therefore ask that all students consider the environment and print fairly. Students may be required to pay for the costs of dissertation binding. Indicative cost is £1.50-£3

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards.

Key course details

UCAS code
I400
Duration
3 years full-time; 4 years full-time (sandwich)
Typical offer
104-112 points
Location
On campus, Winchester