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Biography

Dr Christina Welch is Senior Fellow in Theology and Religious Studies. She gained her first class BA (Hons) in Religious Studies with Psychology at King Alfred’s College in 2000, and her MA (with distinction) in the Archaeology of Art & Representation from the University of Southampton in 2001. In 2005 she gained her AHRB-funded doctorate from the University of Southampton. Titled ‘The Role of Popular Visual Representation in the Construction of North American Indian and Western Alternative Spiritual Identities’, it combined her interests in religion and visual representation. Christina started university as a mature student having previously had a career in the financial services sector. She did much of her study as a single parent, and is dyslexic.

Dr Welch plays a leading role in the Medieval Jewish Winchester project, an interdisciplinary project in which academics from across the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences are working closely with Winchester City Council to rediscover Winchester's forgotten Jewish history and heritage.

A leading authority on late medieval carved cadavers, she recently developed a dedicated website exploring those found in England, Wales and Scotland dating from c. 1425 to 1558, as well as carved cadavers found in Ireland. Find out more about late medieval carved cadavers.

She is currently also engaged in research into Jewish cemeteries in Barbados as well as locally in Winchester.

Higher Education Teaching Qualification

Higher Education Academy Senior Fellowship (SFHEA).

Publications

  • Expected 2017: ‘Late medieval carved cadaver memorials in England and Wales’. In Classen A, (ed). Death in the Medieval. Walter de Gruyer.
  • In press: ‘From Villainous Letch and Sinful Outcast to “especially beloved of God”; Complicating the Medieval Leper through Gender and Social Status’, with Brown, R. Historical Reflections/Reflexions Historique.
  • Welch, C. (2016) ‘Marketing Death through Erotic Art’. In, Dobscha, S, (ed.). Death in a Consumer Culture. London: Routledge: 43-56.
  • Welch, C. (2015) with R. Luyt and R. Lobban ‘Diversity in Gender and Visual Representation: an introduction’ Journal of Gender Studies 24(4): 383-385.
  • Welch, C. (2015) ‘Death and the Erotic Woman: the European Gendering of Mortality in time of Religious Change’. Journal of Gender Studies 24(4): 399-418
  • Welch, Christina (2014) Coffin Calendar Girls: A New Take on an Old Trope. Writing From Below, 2 (1). pp. 1-29.  
  • Welch, C. (2014) ‘Religion and Culture: Religious Artifacts as T-shirts, Toys and Museum Exhibits'. In Hedges P, (ed). Controversies in Contemporary Religion: Volume 2: Debates in the Public Square and Ethical Issues. Oxford: Praeger: 177-212.
  • Welch, C. (2014) with P. Hedges. ‘Charisma, Scriptures, Revelation, and Texts: Sources of Religious Authority, In Hedges P, (ed). Controversies in Contemporary Religion: Volume 1: Theoretical and Academic Debates. Oxford: Praeger: 57-80.
  • Welch, C. (2014) ‘Religion and Culture: Religious Artifacts as T-shirts, Toys and Museum Exhibits'. In Hedges P, (ed). Controversies in Contemporary Religion: Volume 2: Debates in the Public Square and Ethical Issues. Oxford: Praeger: 177-212
  • Welch, C. (2014) with Dr P Hedges. ‘Charisma, Scriptures, Revelation, and Texts: Sources of Religious Authority, In Hedges P, (ed). Controversies in Contemporary Religion: Volume 1: Theoretical and Academic Debates. Oxford: Praeger: 57-80.
  • Welch, C. (2013) ‘Editorial: Death in the Field: utilizing fieldwork to explore the historical interpreting of death related activity, and the emotional coping with death’ Fieldwork in Religion 8(2): 127-132.
  • Welch, C. (2013) ‘For Prayers and Pedagogy: Contextualising English Carved Cadaver Monuments of the Late-Medieval Social and Religious Elite’. Fieldwork in Religion8(2):133-155.
  •  Welch, C. (2012) ‘Teepees & Totem Poles: imaginings of North American Indians in European popular culture for children’. In D. Stirrup & J. MacKay (Eds), Tribal Fantasies; Native Americans in the European Imaginary, 1900 - 2010. New York: Palgrave: 101-116.
  • Welch, C. (2011) ‘Savagery on Show: The Popular Visual Representation of Native American peoples and their Lifeways at the World’s Fairs (1851-1904) and in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West (1884-1904)’. Journal of Early Popular Visual Culture, 9(4): 331-345.
  • Welch, C. (2010). ‘The Spirituality of, and at, Greenham Common Peace Camp’. Feminist Theology, 18(2): 230-248.
  • Welch, C. (2007) ‘Complicating Spiritual Appropriation: North American Indian Agency in Western Alternative Spiritual Practice’. Journal of New Age & Alternative Spiritualities 3: 97-117.
  • Welch, C. (2005) ‘Representations of North American Indian Spirituality in the World of Western Children’ in, Ota, C. & Erricker, C (eds) Spiritual Education: Literary, Empirical & Pedagogical Approaches, Brighton: Sussex Academic Press: 40-58.
  • Welch, C. (2004) ‘Appropriating the Didjeridu and the Sweat Lodge: New Age Baddies and Indigenous Victims?’ in, Lewis, J. (ed.) The Encyclopaedic Source Book of the New Age, New York: Prometheus Press: 349-375.
  • Welch, C. (2002) ‘Appropriating the Didjeridu and the Sweat Lodge: New Age Baddies and Indigenous Victims?’ Journal of Contemporary Religion 17(1): 21-38.

Conferences

Selected recent conference presentations

2017

  • Contextualising the fashion for carved cadaver memorials in late medieval England. Skeletons, Stories and Social Bodies Conference, 24 - 26 March 2017, University of Southampton.

2016

  • 2016: Contextualising English Late-Medieval Carved Cadavers; depicting the pains of purgatory in anatomical art. Othello's Island: International Conference of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Centre for Visual Art and Research, Cyprus

2015 (Keynote Addresses):

  • Anatomy, Religion and English late-Medieval Carved cadaver Sculptures. Morbid Anatomy Seminar Series, Morbid Anatomy Museum, Brooklyn, USA
  • Medieval Jewish Winchester - why remembering this lost community is important to the city, and its contemporary Jewish population. ISGAP Oxford Summer Institute for Curriculum Development in Critical Antisemitism Studies, University of Oxford, Herford College
  • Beyond Memento Mori: the theology, and anatomy of late-medieval English carved cadaver monuments. Cambridge Medieval Art Seminar Series; body/surface/agency, University of Cambridge

Conference organisation

Other recent presentations

  • 2017: Death, Sin and Purgatory in Late-Medieval England. Winchester Cathedral Education Lecture Series, Winchester Cathedral.
  • 2016: How the Dead Help the Living Live. Hopes and Fear Public Engagement event, Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford
  • 2016: English Late Medieval Carved Cadaver Sculptures. 10 days Nights evening talk, Discovery Centre, Winchester

Performances, Exhibitions and Installations

Exhibitions

  • Jan – Mar 2011:‘Bought and Sold: Southampton’s Links with the Slave Trade’, Tudor House Museum, Southampton
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