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COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Study at the University for Sustainability and Social Justice. Learn about the climate emergency and responding to it, how the natural world interacts with today’s changing society and how we can plan for the future
  • Geography is a subject valued by employers and graduates have high employability rates. The course prepares you for a variety of potential career paths.
  • Experience a wide range of teaching and learning methods, including fieldwork, class seminars and workshops, laboratory and IT sessions and independent research.

From glaciers to megacities, geography is the study of the earth’s processes, both natural and human. As a subject it has the capacity to take you almost anywhere, and field exploration is a major component of study. Our course explores some of the most pressing issues facing the planet in the 21st-century: climate change, pressures on the natural world and society and how these can be mitigated and managed.

The course takes a hands-on, practical approach. You could be advising imaginary governments on globalisation, population growth, resource shortages, geopolitical instability and managing natural hazards. You could be planning and carrying out a day surveying a site subject to sea level rise and erosion threats, or gathering samples from the field to analyse past climates. We are set on the edge of the South Downs National Park half an hour from the coast and an hour by train from London. We are perfectly placed to make the most of the diverse and beautiful landscapes that surround Winchester, for both fieldwork and for recreation.

The Foundation Year (first year of study) gives you the chance to commence your studies with us if you have not quite achieved the entry qualifications required or if you feel you would benefit from the opportunity to develop your study skills and subject knowledge prior to embarking on your degree. Through a range of engaging, small-group lessons and practical placements, you will be equipped with the academic, professional and personal skills to help you succeed at university. Modules will cover broad topics as well as an introduction to your chosen subject area. You will also have the opportunity to study alongside students undertaking a range of degree programmes.

Each year of study has a distinctive emphasis. In Year 1 (second year of study) you receive a broad introduction to geography and geographical issues. You receive detailed teaching on the climate emergency, consequences for society and responses. In Year 2 (third year of study), you are encouraged to develop your geographical practice through specialised modules including the option for international fieldwork, laboratory and technology-based elements. An international study abroad semester is available. Skills development (geodata analysis and GIS) and ‘cultural agility’ (the ability to understand and work across cultures and environments) are emphasised strongly.

By the final year (fourth year of study), you are ready to apply your expertise to understand complex geographical problems through original research and to understand the potential external impacts of your work. You will engage in critical thinking and more complex data analysis, building on your studies to date. A final-year project enables you to work alongside our highly respected research staff and showcase your skills to employers.

This combination of solid world knowledge and awareness of impact produces well rounded, confident graduates ready to enter a variety of growing areas of employment in government, science and industry.

Throughout your studies, your future employability is a key priority for us and careers guidance is on hand. Our Geography graduates have the analytical and research skills to secure roles within the Government, the public, private and voluntary sectors, teaching, cartography and surveying, planning, environmental consultancy, nature conservation and sustainability.

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Field trips

We regard field experience as an essential part of studying geography, so we provide ample opportunity for our students to participate in field studies both in the UK and abroad.

In year 1 (second year of study) you experience local day trips that explore the wide range of human and physical environments that our local region has to offer: urban, coastal, fluvial and conservation studies. These are tied closely in with the modules People and Place and Environmental Change (see modules tab).

In year 2 (third year of study) you have the option of an international field trip. In recent years, this trip has been to NE Spain. Based in Girona, it takes in also the dynamic urban environment of Barcelona and the Garrotxa Volcanic Park in the Pyrenean foothills. You will have a week of hard work but a lot of fun as well.

Year 3 (fourth year of study) also includes a number of option modules with day-long field trips. For example, in Biogeography and Conservation we visit conservation sites and rewilding projects in Dorset and Sussex. Managing Environmental Hazards students visit the Environment Agency flood defences and the East Coast. 

Read about Geography alumni, Liisa's field trip to Spain

Study abroad

Our BSc (Hons) Geography course provides an opportunity for you to study abroad in the United States of America or Canada.

For more information see our Study Abroad section.

Learning and teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market. 

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures, seminars, practical workshops (IT and lab) and in the field, you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 0 (Level 3): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 204 hours
  • Independent learning: 996 hours
Year 1 (Level 4): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 276 hours
  • Independent learning: 924 hours
Year 2 (Level 5): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 276 hours
  • Independent learning: 912 hours
  • Placement: 12 hours
Year 3 (Level 6): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 240 hours
  • Independent learning: 948 hours
  • Placement: 12 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course. 

Each year of study has a distinctive emphasis. Year one is concerned with the provision of fundamental geographical concepts, approaches and knowledge. Year two allows students to extend and deepen their knowledge of the subject and hone specific skills of research, fieldwork and communication. Year three allows students to explore the ways in which geography is relevant to the real world and to develop and apply their specific interests.

Across all the teaching in all years, there is an emphasis on the application of geographical theory, knowledge and skills to real world situations. This includes vocationally orientated work and that which has a social or environmental impact. Students are encouraged to get involved in the wider world through, for example, their project work plans.

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester and in the field.

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 0 (Level 3)*:
  • 80% coursework
  • 20% written exams
  • 0% practical exams
Year 1 (Level 4)*:
  • 84% coursework
  • 12% written exams
  • 4% practical exams
Year 2 (Level 5)*:
  • 89% coursework
  • 6% written exams
  • 5% practical exams
Year 3 (Level 6)*:
  • 90% coursework
  • 7% written exams
  • 3% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.

Recent employment destinations for our graduates have included:

  • Local Authorities
  • Environmental consultancy
  • The finance sector
  • Teaching
  • Further research and / or training (including MSc and PhD)

Real Graduate Stories

Harry Pearce, BSc (Hons) Geography
Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Technician 

I am a Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Technician for a consultancy firm based in Hampshire. We use GIS analysis to help Local Authorities to rectify any issues that arise with static and moving traffic orders in their areas.

Studying BSc Geography at the University of Winchester helped me to prepare for this job as a GIS Technician as I learnt how to make report-worthy maps and graphics on various programs including Google Earth, Microsoft Excel and (the industry-standard) ArcGIS. These skills helped me to operate and adapt to specialist GIS software so I could succeed in my current role.

 

Bethany Nicholson, BSc (Hons) Geography, PGCE Primary 5-11

For me, Geography at Winchester has been a very diverse subject, and the choice is really yours. Each academic has their own area of expertise which enabled me to choose, whether I wanted to follow a physical path, a human path, or a mix of both.

Following my BSc Geography, I stayed at the University for an extra year to do a PGCE in Primary Education, bringing my geographical experiences with me. I’ve now moved up the road to begin my teaching career in Basingstoke as a Newly Qualified Teacher. I hope to return to my home of Guernsey in the Channel Islands to teach in the distant future, but not before travelling (and hopefully teaching) in many other parts of the world.

 

Will McVean, BSc (Hons) Geography 2019
Further study and research career

The in-depth teaching in geographical themes and methods I received at Winchester has proved invaluable to the research I have gone on to conduct in my postgraduate degree (MSc in Ecology and Conservation at the University of Aberdeen). The variety of opportunities offered to me during my time at the University was also crucial.

A highlight for me was the final year research project which was my first opportunity to conduct biogeographical/ecological research. My interest in this field has now led me to a funded PhD position at the University of British Columbia, Canada, where I will be exploring the influence of climatic warming on plant species at a remote location in the High Arctic. The fieldwork skills in particular, as well as the general geographical knowledge I developed in the BSc Geography at Winchester, will be essential to my future work in this threatened and fragile ecosystem.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2021 Entry: 48 points

A GCSE A*-C or 9-4 pass in English Language is required.

If English is not your first language: Year 0/Level 3: IELTS 5.5 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in all four components.

Course enquiries and applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234

Send us a message

International students

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by emailing our International Recruitment Team at International@winchester.ac.uk or calling +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Days.

Year 0 (Level 3)

Modules Credits

Succeeding at University 15

Succeeding at University introduces you to learning in higher education and provides you with a framework for reflection and understanding of your own personal learning identity as well as tools for continuing educational success.

Making Sense of the World: The Tools for Argument and Analysis 15

This module is designed to enable you to develop the key critical thinking skills necessary for university study and beyond. Through a combination of lectures and small group seminars the class will discuss many of the key issues that underpin discussion of all academic disciplines. The lectures will introduce key themes and issues that enable students to make sense of the world in a critical fashion while the seminars will allow students to discuss these issues and engage with key readings each week. You are encouraged to apply these abstract concepts to your specific degree path.

Humanity’s Big Question 15
Making Sense of Society 15
Pathways to Peace 15
Society’s Big Questions 15
Big Events in History 15
Optional Modules
  • Meaning of Life on Film - 15 Credits
  • Contemporary Conversations - 15 Credits

Optional Credits

Succeeding at University 15

Succeeding at University introduces you to learning in higher education and provides you with a framework for reflection and understanding of your own personal learning identity as well as tools for continuing educational success.

Making Sense of the World: The Tools for Argument and Analysis 15

This module is designed to enable you to develop the key critical thinking skills necessary for university study and beyond. Through a combination of lectures and small group seminars the class will discuss many of the key issues that underpin discussion of all academic disciplines. The lectures will introduce key themes and issues that enable students to make sense of the world in a critical fashion while the seminars will allow students to discuss these issues and engage with key readings each week. You are encouraged to apply these abstract concepts to your specific degree path.

Humanity’s Big Question 15
Making Sense of Society 15
Pathways to Peace 15
Society’s Big Questions 15
Big Events in History 15
Optional Modules
  • Meaning of Life on Film - 15 Credits
  • Contemporary Conversations - 15 Credits

Year 1 (Level 4)

Modules Credits

People and Place 15

The module introduces human geography through the lenses of the local and the everyday and primarily explores the contributions of social and cultural geography. It focuses on the relationships that people have with place in the contemporary world. It covers issues such as the meanings of place, the enduring nature and importance of place in a globalised world, the ways in which people experience and know places, the deployment of exclusive notions of place and the representation of place.

Global Risks 30

Students explore the centrality of global risk and uncertainty in the contemporary world. They explore issues including geopolitical change, resource and energy futures, climate change, population growth and food security. Students consider the ways in which understanding these risks requires an integrated human and physical geography perspective. The module considers the ways in which these global risks are measured and understood, their impacts and the ways in which international organisations and institutions and national governments attempt to manage them.

Environmental Change 15

Students are introduced to landscape and environmental change at the local scale and over millennial and lesser time scales. The module looks at terrestrial, fluvial and coastal features and associated processes of environmental change and their roles in shaping the landscape and biosphere at the river basin level and below.  It will examine a range of specific landforms and habitats and consider their present forms in the contexts of their evolution during the Pleistocene and Holocene, and associated environmental change. The focus is on the UK and North-western Europe.

Managing Geographical Issues 15

The module will engage with topical regional geographical issues and analyse the range of organisations involved in planning, managing and responding to these issues. It considers the ways in which geographical issues are managed at a variety of scales, the roles of the various organisations involved and the relations between them. The module will introduce students to concepts such as planning, policy, management, and emergency response, the relationships between human and physical aspects of these issues and the ways in which the organisations involved work across these dimensions.

Exploring Geographical Data 15

This module introduces students to various types of secondary, quantitative and qualitative human and environmental geographical data and its uses in academic research and data-driven reporting.  Students explore sources of open-source secondary data, the politics of data storage and access, open-access requirements, the management of data and data policy. Students then explore various ways of manipulating, analysing, visualising and presenting data which includes an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS).

Environment and Society 15

This module aims to develop an understanding of the different 'ways of conceptualising' environmental issues, and the ways in which these influence discussions and debates about the relationships between environment and society, as well as proposed solutions to our warming climate. The module focuses on the three core components of central relevance to current political and geographical debates: capitalism and the environment, environmental governance, and the concepts of 'nature' and 'the environment'.

Geographical Research and Study Skills 15

This module aims to instil in students the key academic skills required to research, structure and write academic assignments and/or to present data verbally and via posters. As such the module considers means by which students can get the most from classes via note taking and follow-up reading. The module also introduces data collection through fieldwork and considers the ethics of such projects and how risk is assessed. Assignment structure and how this differs by type is considered, while approaches to research using traditional written (i.e. academic books and journal papers) and internet sources are also outlined and evaluated. The requirements of and techniques for writing essays, reports and other written assignments are reviewed, and citation and bibliographic skills are developed in practical classes. The importance of illustrations and the use of such media in written assignments, presentations and posters is evaluated, while students’ abilities to present (verbally and in posters) are enhanced in workshops.

Year 2 (Level 5)

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

Geography Project 30

This is an extended piece of independent research undertaken with supervision. Students can develop one of three types of project: a public geography project, a professional geography project or an academic geography project. The project can explore any aspect of human or physical geography or can be an integrated project that explores the interactions between human and physical geography around a specific issue. It builds on one of two Level 5 research training modules. Students are required to consider the impact of their project beyond the discipline of geography and to build this into the research process or to develop it in the Level 6 module #geographywithimpact: Project Impact Case Study.

Geography with Impact: Project Impact Case Study 15

Through this module students develop a case study which demonstrates the external impact of their final year geography project beyond the University. This is developed during the project through supervision by a member of academic staff. Students will explore the impact of their project on either a specific community, an environment, an external private, public or third sector organisation or upon public understanding.  Students will demonstrate the relevance of their work and through it engage with external groups, organisations and contexts.

The Nature of Geography 15

Students explore the development of geography as an academic discipline and the impacts of changing social contexts upon its evolution. It considers the history, philosophy and institutional manifestation of geography. It begins by exploring the early origins of geography before focusing on its emergence and consolidation as an academic discipline in different parts of the world. It also explores geography's search for social relevance and the impacts of recent policies and events on the discipline of geography in the early twenty first century.

Year 3 Optional Modules
  • Managing Environmental Hazards - 15 Credits
  • New Geographies of Crime: Space, Place, Environment and Crime - 15 Credits
  • The Geographies of Global Migration and Development - 15 Credits
  • Biogeography and Conservation - 15 Credits
  • Politics, Energy and the Environment - 15 Credits
  • Critical Geopolitics - 15 Credits
  • Environmental Hydrology - 15 Credits
  • Advanced Study in Geomorphology - 15 Credits
  • Representing the Environment - 15 Credits
  • Value Studies Modules - 15 Credits

Optional Credits

Geography Project 30

This is an extended piece of independent research undertaken with supervision. Students can develop one of three types of project: a public geography project, a professional geography project or an academic geography project. The project can explore any aspect of human or physical geography or can be an integrated project that explores the interactions between human and physical geography around a specific issue. It builds on one of two Level 5 research training modules. Students are required to consider the impact of their project beyond the discipline of geography and to build this into the research process or to develop it in the Level 6 module #geographywithimpact: Project Impact Case Study.

Geography with Impact: Project Impact Case Study 15

Through this module students develop a case study which demonstrates the external impact of their final year geography project beyond the University. This is developed during the project through supervision by a member of academic staff. Students will explore the impact of their project on either a specific community, an environment, an external private, public or third sector organisation or upon public understanding.  Students will demonstrate the relevance of their work and through it engage with external groups, organisations and contexts.

The Nature of Geography 15

Students explore the development of geography as an academic discipline and the impacts of changing social contexts upon its evolution. It considers the history, philosophy and institutional manifestation of geography. It begins by exploring the early origins of geography before focusing on its emergence and consolidation as an academic discipline in different parts of the world. It also explores geography's search for social relevance and the impacts of recent policies and events on the discipline of geography in the early twenty first century.

Year 3 Optional Modules
  • Managing Environmental Hazards - 15 Credits
  • New Geographies of Crime: Space, Place, Environment and Crime - 15 Credits
  • The Geographies of Global Migration and Development - 15 Credits
  • Biogeography and Conservation - 15 Credits
  • Politics, Energy and the Environment - 15 Credits
  • Critical Geopolitics - 15 Credits
  • Environmental Hydrology - 15 Credits
  • Advanced Study in Geomorphology - 15 Credits
  • Representing the Environment - 15 Credits
  • Value Studies Modules - 15 Credits

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2022 Course Tuition Fees 

 UK / Channel Islands /
Isle of Man / Republic of Ireland

International

Year 1 £9,250 £14,100
Year 2 £9,250 £14,100
Year 3 £9,250 £14,100
Year 4 £9,250 £14,100
Total £37,000 £56,400
Optional Sandwich Year* £1,385 £1,385
Total with Sandwich Year £38,385 £57,785

If you are a UK student starting your degree in September 2022, the first year will cost you £9,250**. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a four-year degree would be £37,000 for UK students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £117.50 and a 15 credit module is £1,763.

* Please note that not all courses offer an optional sandwich year. To find out whether this course offers a sandwich year, please contact the programme leader for further information.

**The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year.

ADDITIONAL COSTS

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

Mandatory

Printing and Binding

The University is pleased to offer our students a free printing allowance of £20 each academic year. This will print around 500 A4 mono pages. If students wish to print more, printer credit can be topped up by the student. The University and Student Union are champions of sustainability and we ask all our students to consider the environmental impact before printing. Our Reprographics team also offer printing and binding services, including dissertation binding which may be required by your course with an indicative cost of £1.50-£3.

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards.

Key course details

UCAS code
L70X
Duration
4 years full-time
Typical offer
48 points
Location
On campus, Winchester