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COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Pursue a rewarding career path where you can help people to make a real difference to their lives through a well-organised lifestyle and healthy eating habits
  • Gain the sought-after knowledge and skills required to work in this rapidly growing profession, benefitting from small class sizes and values based training
  • Acquire valuable hands-on experience with a variety of service users and industry organisations through innovative placements throughout your degree, using an integrated skills based approach to developing professional practice
  • Learn from supportive and accessible lecturers who have experience of working in a wide range of related professional fields
  • Approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accredited by the British Dietetic Association (BDA)

Would you like to influence food and health policy across the spectrum, from government to local communities and individuals?

Train to be a registered dietitian and you will be able to apply the nutritional care process; from developing a nutritional diagnosis to managing a wide range of nutrition related health care problems found in today’s society.

Dietitians use public health and scientific research on food, health and disease which they translate into practical guidance to enable people to make appropriate lifestyle and food choices.

This interdisciplinary course combines the study of nutrition science with dietetic practice. Alongside the scientific topics of nutritional biochemistry and physiology, you will also study communication skills, behavioural change techniques, research methods and ethics.

Time will be given for practical workshops in which you will have experience in analysing diets using specialist software, and obtain practice in analysing and diagnosing nutritional problems and developing nutritional care plans. Some work will be undertaken in our biochemistry laboratory.

During the three-year programme you undertake professional placements throughout the course within a variety of healthcare and commercial settings. This will give you the opportunity to develop your clinical skills alongside industry partners, charities and other health care professionals, such as nurses, physiotherapists and sport scientists. 

As part of the University of Winchester’s growing portfolio of health-related programmes, you will benefit from strong relationships with those teaching and studying nursing, health and wellbeing, physiotherapy and sports-related degrees. 

In Year 1, you study Foundations of Nutrition, Fundamentals of Food Science and Food Technology, Preparing for Professional Practice, Introduction to Nutrition Physiology, Introduction to Human Nutrition, Introduction to Sociology and Health, Fundamentals of Communication Skills and Introduction to Biochemistry. 

With a good foundation in place, in Year 2 you critically explore areas such as Biochemistry and Human Physiology in more depth as well as studying Clinical Dietetics, Health, Disease and Nutrition, Introduction to Scientific Research Methods and Enterprise, , Pharmacology, Behavioural Sciences, Professionalism in Dietetics, Public Health and Epidemiology  including  Healthcare Systems in the UK. Proposed optional modules may include Malnutrition at Home and Abroad, Eating Disorders, and Nutrition Across the Lifespan.

Your final-year subjects include Integrated Nutrition Care Planning – Adults and Paediatrics, and Applied Professional Practice. In addition you undertake an Independent Project in Nutrition and Dietetics in an area that especially interests you.

On completion of the degree you will have the knowledge to be able to educate people about the best ways to eat and drink in order to keep their body fit and healthy.

This degree is accredited by the British Dietetic Association (BDA) and approved by the Health and Care Professions Council. It leads to eligibility to apply for HCPC registration (you are required to complete 1,000 hours of clinical placement to be eligible) and follows the core curriculum set out by the BDA. As a graduate of this programme you can enter the profession of dietetics once registered as a dietitian.

Accreditation

This programme is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accredited by the British Dietetic Association (BDA).

British Dietetic Association (BDA) accredited programme logo

Careers

With increasing community interest in food, nutrition and health, there’s a real demand for specialists across a range of industry sectors. You will be able to seek jobs in diverse fields and organisations, including the NHS (specialising in areas such as paediatrics, nutritional support, and sports nutrition), research, media or marketing, consumer groups, food manufacturing or a government agency.

94% of our 2016/17 graduates (first degree and other undergraduate courses) were in employment and/or further study six months after completing their course (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey).

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degree with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Work placements

You have the opportunity to undertake professional practice placements during the programme for three months, six months or one year. Three or six month placements can be taken as part of credit bearing modules, allowing you to undertake a work placement and still graduate within three years.

Learning and teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market.

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc., you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 1 (Level 4): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 325.5 hours
Independent learning: 942 hours
Placement: 240 hours

Year 2 (Level 5): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 262.5 hours
Independent learning: 720 hours
Placement: 435 hours

Year 3 (Level 6): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*

Teaching, learning and assessment: 223.5 hours
Independent learning: 784 hours
Placement: 412.5 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course.

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester.

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 1 (Level 4)*:

94% coursework
0% written exams
6%  practical exams

Year 2 (Level 5)*:

59% coursework
30% written exams
11% practical exams

Year 3 (Level 6)*:

61% coursework
18% written exams
21% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures section.

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2021 Entry: 120-128 UCAS tariff points, to include Biology/Human Biology at grade C or equivalent plus another science (chemistry preferred).

A GCSE A*- C or 9-4 pass in GCSE English language, mathematics and a science is required.

International Baccalaureate: 120-128 points to include Higher level IB certificates in Biology and a second approved science at grade 5 or above.

If English is not your first language, Year1/Level 4: IELTS of 7.0 overall, with no component below 6.5 is required

Subject to validation

Course Enquiries and Applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234

Send us a message

International Students

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by emailing our International Recruitment Team at International@winchester.ac.uk or calling +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Days

Additional requirements

  • Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance. This will be arranged by the University for candidates accepting an offer for a place on this course. 
  • Occupational health clearance. This will be arranged by the University for candidates accepting an offer for a place on this course.

Year 1 (Level 4)

Modules Credits

Introduction to Biochemistry 15

This module offers an introduction to the study of nutrition from a biochemical perspective. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about what matters in biochemistry, nutrition, health and disease. This module will help students to understand difficult concepts and explore some of the fundamental questions and challenges in nutritional biochemistry today. Using examples from clinical cases, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to nutritional biochemistry, with consideration of the model and process of dietetic practice. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Fundamentals of Food Science 15

This module offers an introduction to food and catering systems management. As a key member of health food service operations, dietitians provide expertise to ensure recipes and menus are safe, sustainable and financially reasonable. This module also aims to increase students understanding of the importance of food safety and catering systems management, and its contribution to patient health outcomes. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking.

Introduction to Nutritional Physiology 15

This module offers an introduction to the study of nutrition from a physiological perspective. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about what matters in nutritional physiology and health. This module will help students to understand difficult concepts and explore some of the fundamental questions and challenges in nutritional physiology today. Using examples from clinical cases, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to nutritional physiology, with consideration of the model and process of dietetic practice. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Preparing for Professional Practice 15

This module is designed to develop students’ professionalism for practice. It also aims to increase students understanding of the importance of professionalism, within the framework of the HCPC standards of conduct, performance and ethics and its intimate links to patient safety. A key factor within the module will be enabling students to investigate the factors involved in safe dietetic practice, including students’ responsibilities and how to raise concerns. The Model and process of dietetic practice will also be introduced in this module. Reflective practice and critical appraisal tools will also be used to appraise scientific evidence and other sources, to develop professionalism for safe and effective dietetic practice.

Practice Education 1 0

This module offers an exploration into dietitian competencies through the framework of the Model and process of dietetic practice, including collection and interpretation of patient-related information, providing the opportunity to regularly observe clinical practice. 

Specifically, this module will enhance student’s ability to integrate theoretical  learning about areas such as food safety and catering within a healthcare context. This module will also help students to understand difficult concepts and explore some of the fundamental questions and  challenges in dietetic practice today. Using examples from across the globe, students will also be  encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to dietetic practice. Students will receive guidance on their responsibilities and how to raise concerns.  At the same time, an  emphasis will be placed on the development of compassionate care using a values based approach, being mindful of the HCPC standards of conduct, performance and ethics, in addition to developing transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Introduction to Human Nutrition 15

This module will use lectures to explore current issues in human nutrition. Specifically, this module will engage students in discussions around contemporary nutrition and health topics while considering Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis. This module will provide students with an understanding of DOHaD in addition to recent research advances in nutrition, the application to health and the relationship to professional issues in nutrition. In so doing, this module will  help students to understand the developmental origins of disease and health within a multicultural society through an appreciation and understanding of the DOHaD hypothesis and its evidence base. Using examples from across the  globe, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to health and disease, and the intergenerational impact of environmental and sociological insults. An emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking.

Introduction to Sociology and Health 15

This module offers an introduction to the study of dietetics from a sociological perspective. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about health inequalities in relation to how and where people live and the effect it has on their health and wellbeing, with consideration of the model and process of dietetic practice. In so doing, this module will help students to understand sociological concepts within a multicultural society through an appreciation and understanding of the discipline of sociology and its evidence base. Using examples from across the globe, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to sociology. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Fundamentals of Communication Skills 15

This module offers an introduction to the study of communication skills and supports students to be effective communicators. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about the need for ongoing continuous professional development in relation to communication skills. This module will help students to understand difficult concepts and explore some of the fundamental questions and challenges in communication skills training today. Using examples from across the globe, students will be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to communication skills. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on effective communication within the model and process of dietetic practice and the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking.

Fundamentals of Behavioural Science 15

This module offers an introduction to the study of dietetics from a behavioural sciences perspective. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about psychological theories of health and illness. This module will also help students to understand the psychological basis of eating, which will assist students with the psychological aspects of the Model and Process of dietetic practice. Using examples from across the globe, students will be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to health psychology. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Year 2 (Level 5)

Modules Credits

Clinical Dietetics 1 15

This module examines the study of dietetics from a practical perspective. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about what matters in clinical dietetics practice, across the lifespan from infancy to older adults. This module will also help students to understand difficult concepts and examine some of the fundamental questions and challenges in dietetics practice today. Using examples from dietetics practice, students will be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to clinical dietetics considering a values based approach to nutrition care, individualisation, making every contact count, patient/family centred care. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Pharmacology 15

This module examines pharmacological approaches to the management of health conditions that involve a significant dietitian contribution. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about clinical pharmacology, drug metabolism and drug nutrient interactions that relate to dietetic practice. Using examples from across the globe, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to pharmacology in dietetics. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Professionalism in Dietetics 15

This module is designed to further develop students’ professionalism for practice, including leadership, team working and resilience in practice, business and workforce planning and the patient pathways, within the framework of the HCPC standards of conduct, performance and ethics.

Students will begin to integrate and consolidate knowledge around the use of a values based approach to nutrition care, individualisation of medical and nutrition care using patient pathways, making every contact count and the use of patient/family centred care. It also aims to increase students understanding of the importance of professionalism, and its intimate links to patient safety - including students’ responsibilities and how to raise concerns, particularly with respect to electronic patient records and the use of remote or video consultations. A key factor within this second module on professionalism will be enabling students to practically demonstrated skills required safe dietetic practice. Reflective practice and critical appraisal tools will also be used to appraise scientific evidence and other sources, to develop professionalism for safe and effective dietetic practice.

 

Practice Education 2 30

This module offers students an opportunity to demonstrate effective communication in practice. Specifically, this module will engage students in written and verbal communication as well as the promotion of health through the delivery and evaluation of appropriate learning experiences to meet the health needs of individuals and/or groups. Using clinical cases, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to clinical decision-making. Students will adhere to the HCPC standards of conduct, performance and ethics,  receive guidance on their responsibilities and how to raise concerns. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Clinical Dietetics 2 15

This module will equip students with the understanding and skills necessary for safe and effective practice in dietetics. The module will also further develop students clinical decision-making skills to ensure effective and safe management of patients with dietetic-related diseases. Specifically, this module will help students to understand difficult concepts and examine some of the fundamental questions and challenges in dietetics today. Using examples from across the globe, students will be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to dietetic practice with reference to the double burden of malnutrition, in addition to considering how a values based approach to nutrition care can be achieved, individualisation of nutrition care, making every contact count and the use of patient/family centred care. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Behavioural Science 15

This module offers students an opportunity to further develop and apply their knowledge of psychology and gain an understanding of current theories of psychology that are relevant to eating behaviour change in groups and individuals. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about what matters in dietetics. This module will help students to understand difficult concepts and examine some of the fundamental questions and challenges in dietetics today. Using examples from across the globe, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to eating behaviour change. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Research Methods 15

This module with develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the research process.  This will include areas of research design such as constructing a research question, quantitative and qualitative research methods, the place of audit, sampling and recruitment, data governance, collection and analysis techniques and research quality/threats to credibility and trustworthiness of data.  It will give students the opportunity to develop a protocol design, using group work, understand the ethical process, and how to manage a research project.  It will also deal with issues of dissemination.

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

Integrated Nutrition Care Planning - Adults 15

This module will equip students with the understanding and skills necessary for safe and effective practice in dietetics before their final practice placement module giving them time to further practice, using the BDA Nutrition Care Plan process focusing on individuals with specific diseases states promoting a deeper understanding of nutrition knowledge. The module will also further  develop students clinical decision-making skills to ensure effective and safe management of patients with dietetic-related diseases, with a focus on contemporary areas such as; critical illness including long-term nutrition rehabilitation and feeding, pre-habilitation as part of cancer treatment, nutritional support in the elderly and the use of  the FODMAP diet for gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome . At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the  development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Integrated Nutrition Care Planning - Paediatrics 15

This module will equip students with the understanding and skills necessary for safe and effective practice in dietetics before their final practice placement module giving them time to further practice, using the BDA Nutrition Care Plan process focusing on individuals with specific diseases states promoting a deeper understanding of nutrition knowledge. The module will also further  develop students clinical decision-making skills to ensure effective and safe management of patients with dietetic-related diseases, with a focus on; prematurity, critical illness, congenital heart disease, complex food allergy, feeding difficulties and inflammatory bowel disease . In addition students will consider in detail how they will implement  values based approach to nutrition care can be achieved, individualisation of nutrition care, making every contact count and the use of family centred care. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Public Health and Epidemiology 15

This module critically examines the study of dietetics from a public health perspective. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about what matters in dietetics, public health, and food policy. This module will help students to understand difficult concepts and critically examine some of the fundamental questions and challenges in public health nutrition and epidemiology today. Using examples from across the globe, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to public health nutrition and epidemiology. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Research Methods and Enterprise 15

This module critically examines research methods in dietetics. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about what matters in dietetics. This module will help students to understand difficult concepts and explore some of the fundamental questions and challenges in dietetics research today. Using examples from across the globe, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to the research process in dietetics. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Dissertation 30

This module offers an introduction to the study of dietetics from a research perspective. Specifically, this module will engage students in contemporary discussions about what matters in dietetics research. This module will help students to understand difficult concepts and critically examine some of the fundamental questions and challenges in dietetics research today. Using examples from across the globe, students will be encouraged to critically reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to research in dietetics. At the same time, an emphasis will be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Practice Education 3 30

This module offers students with further opportunities for independent and autonomous practice. Specifically, this module will engage students in communicating safely and effectively with individuals and groups of service users and the wider multi-disciplinary healthcare professional team using tailored methods. In addition students will implement  a values based approach to nutrition care can be achieved, individualisation of nutrition care, making every contact count and the use of family centred care. This module will also help students to consolidate clinical reasoning processes underpinned by a sound evidence base across a range of practice environments and specialities, such as safe caseload management. Students will adhere to the HCPC standards of conduct, performance and ethics, and receive guidance on their responsibilities and how to raise concerns. Using examples from across the globe, students will also be encouraged to reflect on their basic assumptions with regards to dietetic practice. At the same time, an emphasis will  be placed on the development of transferable academic skills and critical thinking in particular.

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2021 Course Tuition Fees

 UK / Channel Islands /
Isle of Man / Republic of Ireland 

International*

Year 1 £9,250 £13,800
Year 2 £9,250 £13,800
Year 3 £9,250 £13,800
Total £27,750 £41,400
Optional Sandwich Year** £1,385 £1,385
Total with Sandwich Year £29,135 £42,785

If you are a UK student starting your degree in September 2021, the first year will cost you £9,250***. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £115 and a 15 credit module is £1,725.

*Please note, the tuition fees for students from the EU (excluding UK and Republic of Ireland) are yet to be confirmed by the University.

** Please note that not all courses offer an optional sandwich year. To find out whether this course offers a sandwich year, please contact the programme leader for further information.

***The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year.

Additional costs

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS)

DBS clearance check is required when applicants accept their offer for a place on the course. Indicative cost is £40.

British Dietetic Association (BDA) Student Membership

British Dietetic Association (BDA) Student Membership is a requirement of the course. Indicative cost is £37 per year from Year 2 of your studies. Membership is free in your first year.

Benefits include: a free subscription to PEN (worth £350 per year), online access to Dietetics Today, insurance to cover you on placements, access to Groups & Branches for events and networking, £30 off the Manual of Dietetic Practice, money saving via BDA rewards, and access to student volunteering opportunities.

Uniform

One uniform will be provided but you are likely to require additional uniforms. Indicative cost: £30.

Placement Expenses

There are placements in each year of the programme that are organised by the University with regional healthcare providers. Insurance for students on placement and the necessary immunisation/vaccination is provided by the University.

Students will need to travel to placements/arrange accommodation. In some cases there may be costs incurred here for travel and accommodation. 

The University will pay for an occupational health assessment; however, you may need to pay for immunisations if they are not covered by your GP.

Visits

Nutrition modules may include optional visits to specialist healthcare facilities, exhibitions etc. You will normally be expected to cover the cost of travel and admission, unless otherwise specified in the module profile.

Core Texts

Core texts are available from the University Library; however some students prefer to purchase their own copies. These can be bought second hand or as an e-book, which can often reduce this cost. Indicative cost is £70-£299 per academic year.

Printing and binding

The University is pleased to offer our students a free printing allowance of £20 each academic year. This will print around 500 A4 mono pages. If students wish to print more, printer credit can be topped up by the student. The University and Student Union are champions of sustainability and we ask all our students to consider the environmental impact before printing. Our Reprographics team also offer printing and binding services, including dissertation binding which may be required by your course with an indicative cost of £1.50-£3.

Scholarships, bursaries and awards

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards page.

Key course details

UCAS code
B400
Duration
3 years full-time
Typical offer
120-128 points
Location
On campus, Winchester