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COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Join a long tradition of legal history in the city of Winchester
  • Set yourself up to flourish in your degree and beyond with our Foundation Year
  • Develop real-world professional skills from practical assessments such as mooting and negotiation
  • Gain an impressive range of other transferable skills that will prepare you for future employment in both legal and non-legal working environments
  • Benefit from small numbers in tutorials, which allow for rewarding discussions and debates and closer interaction with our expert staff

Winchester has been central to the English legal system for at least 1,000 years. Choose to study here and you will be following in a long, historic tradition. It was King Alfred who established English law-making and its ideology as a distinctive system which would have a major influence on the common law of later medieval England. Even today, The Domesday Book, a cornerstone legal document compiled in Winchester, is still valid as evidence of title to land.

Law continues to provide the framework for modern society, impacting on all our lives. As a law student at Winchester you build a thorough knowledge of previous case law to enable you to explore questions at the core of the world we live in. From the protection of life and liberty to international relationships, law provides the mechanism for change employed by governments around the world.

Studying for a law degree with us is an intellectually stimulating and thought-provoking experience. The programme encourages you to develop an enquiring and critical attitude to law, learn to think logically and communicate clearly. You become proficient in vital skills such as legal research, negotiation and mooting - presenting a legal argument to defeat an opponent in court. Mooting brings law alive and you may find yourself discussing a wide range of topics from discrimination in the workplace to third-party rights when downloading music from the internet.

These skills are invaluable as teaching techniques to help develop successful law graduates. The emphasis on skills-based learning is a core component of the programme and forms a key element in the assessment pattern.

This programme is ideal if you are interested in becoming a practising solicitor or barrister. It also suits those seeking a flexible qualification with a solid foundation in law that leads to a wide-range of careers in both the public and private sectors.

A Foundation Year is the perfect way to boost your academic skills, build your confidence and develop your wider subject knowledge so you can succeed at Winchester. This course offers an extra year of study at the start (Year 0) which leads onto a full degree programme (Years 1, 2 and 3).

A Foundation Year is ideal if you are returning to education after a break; haven’t quite achieved the entry qualifications required; are wanting more support during the transition to studying at university; or are unsure about which subject you wish to pursue.

In Year 0, you will study a set of modules from across the Faculty of Business, Law and Digital Technologies which are designed to develop your academic and practical skills. This broader focus in your first year introduces you to studying at university level and provides you with a better understanding of Law and related subjects.

You will experience a variety of teaching methods including lectures, discussion-based seminars and independent study. You will also receive support to boost your academic skills to prepare you for the rest of your time at Winchester. Find out more and hear from our Foundation Year students at winchester.ac.uk/foundation 

If you intend to qualify as a solicitor or barrister, you have to complete an academic stage of training before going on to a vocational stage. All law degrees recognised by the Law Society and the Bar Council (known as Qualifying Law Degrees) involve the study of seven key subjects - the ‘Foundations of Legal Knowledge’. This LLB is a Qualifying Law Degree recognised by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board.

Accreditation

Accredited by the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) for the purpose of a Qualifying Law Degree.

Careers

Graduates may choose to go on to the vocational stage of training which is required before beginning to practice law either as a solicitor or a barrister. Others enter a wide range of careers in the private and public sectors.

Pre-approved for a Masters

University of Winchester students studying Bachelor Honours degrees are pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible students must apply by the end of March in their final year and meet the entry requirements of their chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applications from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market.                      

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc.), you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 0 (Level 3): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 228 hours
  • Independent learning: 948 hours
  • Placement: 24 hours
Year 1 (Level 4): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 276 hours
  • Independent learning: 924 hours
Year 2 (Level 5): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 252 hours
  • Independent learning: 936 hours
  • Placement: 12 hours
Year 3 (Level 6): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 252 hours
  • Independent learning: 948 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course. 

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester.

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 0 (Level 3)*:
  • 87% coursework
  • 13% written exams
  • 0% practical exams
Year 1 (Level 4)*:
  • 12% coursework
  • 50% written exams
  • 38% practical exams
Year 2 (Level 5)*:
  • 68% coursework
  • 6% written exams
  • 26% practical exams
Year 3 (Level 6)*:
  • 74% coursework
  • 3% written exams
  • 23% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2021 Entry: 48 points

A GCSE C or 4 pass in English Language is required.

If English is not your first language:

Year 0/Level 3: IELTS 5.5 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in all four components. 

Course Enquiries and Applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234

Send us a message

International Students

International students seeking additional information about this programme can send an email to International@winchester.ac.uk or call +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Days

Year 0 (Level 3)

Modules Credits

Succeeding at University 15

Succeeding at University introduces you to learning in higher education and provides you with a framework for reflection and understanding of your own personal learning identity as well as tools for continuing educational success.

The Future of the Planet 15

In 2015, global leaders committed to the 2030 Agenda of 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals putting sustainable development at the heart of the global development endeavour. The goals aim to address a range of challenges. These include the need for action on climate change and degraded natural resources and the distribution of power and resources that challenge poverty reduction efforts. This module introduces students to key concepts, literature and debates to investigate relationships between the topics and issues encompassed within (and beyond) the Sustainable Development Goals.

Making Sense of the World: The Tools for Argument and Analysis 15

This module is designed to enable you to develop the key critical thinking skills necessary for university study and beyond. Through a combination of lectures and small group seminars the class will discuss many of the key issues that underpin discussion of all academic disciplines. The lectures will introduce key themes and issues that enable students to make sense of the world in a critical fashion while the seminars will allow students to discuss these issues and engage with key readings each week. You are encouraged to apply these abstract concepts to your specific degree path.

Contemporary Legal Issues 15

Students will have the opportunity to develop their critical thinking considering the role of law in contemporary issues that frame our everyday life and interactions with others. It will enable students to develop important practical skills, necessary in enhancing your overall personal, professional and academic capabilities.

Law for Business 15

Knowledge of key areas of law is essential to operate a business successfully. This module covers the most important and frequently occurring areas of law relevant to business. Utilising business scenarios this module will develop students’ awareness of the legal environment within which business operates, as well as to certain substantive areas of law that apply to commercial operations. 

Introduction to Markets 15

An understanding of markets is central to the study of business.  This module explores markets and market economics, encouraging discussion of how individual consumers, industrial firms, governments, and other networks and organisations affect consumer culture and shape market dynamics. You will consider current consumer trends and increasing consumer power and consumer participation. The implications of new and emerging markets will also be discussed, as will historical and cultural aspects of the move towards consumerism.  The module provides an introduction to a range of data sources and analytical tools concerning market and consumer trends.

Working with People 15

This module develops your ability to work in different contexts and organisations. In preparing for this you will be provided with opportunities to experience different aspects of working with people in organisations through practical learning activities within the seminars and workshops. You will be introduced to a range of organisation behaviour theories to inform and explain different aspects of with people in organisations. The Sustainable Development Goals are referenced to develop awareness of the wider impact of individual and organisation behaviour.

Optional Modules
  • Being the Difference - 15 Credits
  • How to be an Entrepreneur – 15 credits
  • Working with numbers - 15 credits

Optional Credits

Succeeding at University 15

Succeeding at University introduces you to learning in higher education and provides you with a framework for reflection and understanding of your own personal learning identity as well as tools for continuing educational success.

The Future of the Planet 15

In 2015, global leaders committed to the 2030 Agenda of 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals putting sustainable development at the heart of the global development endeavour. The goals aim to address a range of challenges. These include the need for action on climate change and degraded natural resources and the distribution of power and resources that challenge poverty reduction efforts. This module introduces students to key concepts, literature and debates to investigate relationships between the topics and issues encompassed within (and beyond) the Sustainable Development Goals.

Making Sense of the World: The Tools for Argument and Analysis 15

This module is designed to enable you to develop the key critical thinking skills necessary for university study and beyond. Through a combination of lectures and small group seminars the class will discuss many of the key issues that underpin discussion of all academic disciplines. The lectures will introduce key themes and issues that enable students to make sense of the world in a critical fashion while the seminars will allow students to discuss these issues and engage with key readings each week. You are encouraged to apply these abstract concepts to your specific degree path.

Contemporary Legal Issues 15

Students will have the opportunity to develop their critical thinking considering the role of law in contemporary issues that frame our everyday life and interactions with others. It will enable students to develop important practical skills, necessary in enhancing your overall personal, professional and academic capabilities.

Law for Business 15

Knowledge of key areas of law is essential to operate a business successfully. This module covers the most important and frequently occurring areas of law relevant to business. Utilising business scenarios this module will develop students’ awareness of the legal environment within which business operates, as well as to certain substantive areas of law that apply to commercial operations. 

Introduction to Markets 15

An understanding of markets is central to the study of business.  This module explores markets and market economics, encouraging discussion of how individual consumers, industrial firms, governments, and other networks and organisations affect consumer culture and shape market dynamics. You will consider current consumer trends and increasing consumer power and consumer participation. The implications of new and emerging markets will also be discussed, as will historical and cultural aspects of the move towards consumerism.  The module provides an introduction to a range of data sources and analytical tools concerning market and consumer trends.

Working with People 15

This module develops your ability to work in different contexts and organisations. In preparing for this you will be provided with opportunities to experience different aspects of working with people in organisations through practical learning activities within the seminars and workshops. You will be introduced to a range of organisation behaviour theories to inform and explain different aspects of with people in organisations. The Sustainable Development Goals are referenced to develop awareness of the wider impact of individual and organisation behaviour.

Optional Modules
  • Being the Difference - 15 Credits
  • How to be an Entrepreneur – 15 credits
  • Working with numbers - 15 credits

Year 1 (Level 4)

Modules Credits

The English Legal System and Academic Legal Skills 15

This module introduces students to the structure and operation of the institutions and processes of the English legal system. It will consider at the primary and secondary sources of English law and how the law is interpreted. In addition, the module will allow students to develop a theoretical understanding of a number of foundation academic legal skills used in the study and practice of law.

Introduction to English Legal Process and Practical Legal Skills 15

This module introduces students to the civil and criminal justice systems in England and Wales. Students will gain an insight into the role of judges, the legal professions and lay participation in the legal system. In addition, the module will allow students to develop a theoretical understanding of a number of foundation practical legal skills used in the study and practice of law.

Law of Contract – Formation and Terms 15

The Law of Contract deals with multi-million-pound deals, such as shipbuilding down to the purchase of a cup of tea. It concerns how agreements are made and become binding, impediments to agreement being reached, what obligations are created and who they affect. This module is an introduction to the law of Contract and its social and economic impact.

Law of Contract – Problems and Remedies 15

This module builds on the understanding gained in the module, Law of Contract - Foundations and Terms and explores the problems which can arise during the formation and performance of a contract and how the common law and statute has developed to remedy these issues. This module will also explore how a contract can be terminated, and the remedies which are available for breach of contract, as well as their practical consequences.

Introduction to Public Law 15

This module explores core issues relating to the UK constitution, such as the role of parliament and the monarchy within a parliamentary democracy. We will examine the balance of power between parliament and the courts, as well as the powers of government and its limitations. The module introduces students to the legal and political sources of the British constitution, the relationship of the State towards its citizens and to other States, and to the scope of the courts to review government action. 

Public Law: Judicial Review and Human Rights 15

This module continues to explore the constitutional role of the courts in examining the actions of government, as well as the steps a petitioner must take when asking a court review the legality of government action. We will examine the legal analysis used by the courts in the process of judicial review of the government. This module will encourage you to examine the individual human rights afforded to citizens, as well as the protections provided by the common law.

Foundations of the Law of Tort 15

A ‘tort’ is a civil wrong against protected interests such as the physical integrity of the person, land and property, reputation and economic interests. This module introduces some foundations of the of torts. It considers key principles of selected torts and considers their historical development. This module will examine the interactions between law and public policy, as well as the social and philosophical foundations of the law of torts more broadly.

Further Principles of Tort 15

This module follows on from the Foundations of the Law of Torts module and aims to further develop the knowledge and skills already gained.  This module studies a range of different torts, each varying in nature and possessing unique complexity. This could include those relating to physical integrity of the person, land and property, reputation and economic interests.  The key principles of various selected torts and their historical development are explored including reflections on the social and public policy implications, as well as the philosophical or social foundations of each tort studied.

Year 2 (Level 5)

Modules Credits

Criminal Law - Principles and Personal Offences 15

The criminal law provides citizens with a framework set of rules for conducting day to day activities. Under the criminal law, those people who have been found to fail to comply to these rules are punished. The state – through legislation and common law – uses its power to uphold these rules and award punishments to those who offend. The criminal law covers a wide range of behaviours that vary in severity and regularity. This module focuses on the fundamental principles of criminal law. It explores key offences against the person, including non-fatal offences against the person, homicide, and sexual offences, and examines legal and moral issues relating to these offences.

Criminal Law - Property Related Offences 15

The criminal law provides citizens with a framework set of rules for conducting day to day activities. Under the criminal law, those people who have been found to fail to comply to these rules are punished. The state – through legislation and common law – uses its power to uphold these rules and award punishments to those who offend. The criminal law covers a wide range of behaviours that vary in severity and regularity. This module focuses on the fundamental principles of criminal law. It also explores key offences against property, including theft, criminal damage, burglary, robbery and fraud, and examines legal and moral issues relating to these offences.

Equity and Trusts Law 15

To begin with, this module requires an appreciation of the historical development of Equity as a key means of understanding our current system of courts, and how equitable principles and remedies continue to play a crucial role in our justice system. Students will be encouraged to consider a broad range of important themes, such as conscionability, fairness and justice, as well as Equity’s fundamental intention to promote flexibility in the application of the law. Much of this module will focus on the Trust, and how it operates in practice. The trustee, appointed to carry out the trust instrument, is bound by their duty to uphold the terms of the trust, and this module will explore the potential for serious breaches, and the consequences which arise as a result.   

Land Law 15

Land Law deals with one of society’s most valuable assets. Land is recognised as essential to the realisation and pursuit of a good life. It is therefore crucial to understand and evaluate key concepts such as relativity of title and safeguarding legal and equitable interests in land. During this module, students will gain understanding of the principles which underpin this area of law, as well as how it has developed and changed over time.

Optional Modules
  • Employment Law - 15 Credits
  • Equality Law - 15 Credits
  • Medical Law - 15 Credits
  • Human Rights Law - 15 Credits
  • Sports and the Law - 15 Credits
  • Criminal Justice - 15 Credits
  • Evidence Law - 15 Credits
  • Company Law – The Corporate Body - 15 Credits
  • Company Law – Corporate Governance - 15 Credits
  • Immigration Law and Policy - 15 Credits
  • Volunteering for Law Students - 15 Credits
  • Value Studies module - 15 Credits
  • Study Abroad - 30 Credits

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

Dissertation 30

Students will need to choose either Dissertation OR Independent Research Project

 

The Law Dissertation module provides students with an opportunity to research an area of law which is of particular interest. Students will be assigned supervisor who will help to guide and support them as they focus their research question on a specific area of law.

Students are expected to meet with their supervisor and work with them to formulate a working title and structure, with a view to producing a coherent and detailed dissertation which critically analyses a particular legal issue. This will require researching a range of primary and/or secondary legal sources and materials in order to engage with the required depth of analysis and evaluation.

Independent Research Project 15

Students will need to choose either Dissertation OR Independent Research Project

 

The Independent Research Project module provides students with an opportunity to undertake an independent study, with the support of an assigned supervisor. This will facilitate the in-depth critical analysis of an area of law which is of interest to the student.

Students are expected to meet with their supervisor and work with them to formulate a working title and structure, with a view to producing a coherent research project on a particular legal issue. This will require engaging in a critical analysis of primary and/or secondary legal sources and materials.

European Union Law 15

Firstly, we will look at the jurisdiction of the Court of Justice of the European Union with particular reference to the preliminary ruling procedure and the ability of the European Commission to act in their role as Guardian of the Treaties. Then we will proceed to analyse the application of case law from the Court of Justice of the European Union dealing specifically with issues relating to the free movement of goods within the internal market. We will analyse both fiscal and non-fiscal barriers to the free movement of goods. Then we will turn our attention to the free movement of workers within the European Union and the advantages associated with being a citizen of the European Union. Our discussion will involve interpretation of treaty provisions and EU Directives as well as application of relevant case law from the Court of Justice of the European Union. 

Optional Modules
  • Criminal Law – Principles of Personal Offences - 15 Credits
  • Criminal Law – Property Related Offences - 15 Credits
  • Current Legislative Problems - 15 Credits
  • Evidence Law - 15 Credits
  • Advocacy - 15 Credits
  • Technology and Cyberlaw - 15 Credits
  • Philosophy of Law - 15 Credits
  • Child Law and Policy - 15 Credits
  • Mental Health Law - 15 Credits
  • Intellectual Property Law - 15 Credits
  • Criminal Justice - 15 Credits
  • Employment Law - 15 Credits
  • Equality Law - 15 Credits
  • Human Rights Law - 15 Credits
  • Medical Law - 15 Credits
  • Sports and the Law - 15 Credits
  • Family Law - 15 Credits
  • Comparative Public Law - 15 Credits
  • Company Law – The Corporate Body - 15 Credits
  • European and International Labour Law - 15 Credits
  • International Criminal Law - 15 Credits
  • Immigration Law and Policy - 15 Credits
  • Environmental Law and Policy - 15 Credits
  • Employment Law in the Workplace - 15 Credits
  • Advanced Equity and Trusts Law - 15 Credits
  • Value Studies module - 15 Credits

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2022 Course Tuition Fees 

 UK / Channel Islands /
Isle of Man / Republic of Ireland

International

Year 1 £9,250 £14,100
Year 2 £9,250 £14,100
Year 3 £9,250 £14,100
Year 4 £9,250 £14,100
Total £37,000 £56,400
Optional Sandwich Year* £1,385 £1,385
Total with Sandwich Year £38,385 £57,785

If you are a UK student starting your degree in September 2022, the first year will cost you £9,250**. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a four-year degree would be £37,000 for UK students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £117.50 and a 15 credit module is £1,763.

* Please note that not all courses offer an optional sandwich year. To find out whether this course offers a sandwich year, please contact the programme leader for further information.

**The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year.

Additional Costs

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Optional

Formal wear: 

Students may be expected to dress formally for oral assessments. Costs will vary depending on the student's existing wardrobe. Indicative cost £0 - £50. 

Mandatory

Core texts: 

Law students are expected to purchase core texts for almost all law modules and some modules also require the purchase of statute books. This could amount to approximately £800 over the course of the degree for single honours depending on module selection. Indicative cost £800 across 3 years of study.

Volunteering and placements:

Students will incur travel costs on a mandatory volunteering placement in their Foundation Year (Year 0). Indicative cost: £5 - £30 per day

Printing and binding: 

The University is pleased to offer our students a free printing allowance of £20 each academic year. This will print around 500 A4 mono pages. If students wish to print more, printer credit can be topped up by the student. The University and Student Union are champions of sustainability and we ask all our students to consider the environmental impact before printing. Our Reprographics team also offer printing and binding services, including dissertation binding which may be required by your course with an indicative cost of £1.50-£3.

Course specific bursaries/scholarships

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards page.

Key course details

UCAS code
M10X
Duration
4 years full-time
Typical offer
48 points
Location
On campus, Winchester