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COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Explore the power of film and other modern media and gain a practical grounding for careers in the media industries

  • Study the impact of digital media and the convergence of old and new media

  • Deepen your understanding and enjoyment of film and develop your critical thinking as part of a lively community

  • Take advantage of outstanding industry-standard facilities to learn practical film techniques and skills at our on-campus Multimedia Centre

  • Experience different cultures and gain valuable life skills by studying abroad in the USA or Japan

Film is a powerful and accessible cultural form that opens up new worlds to us. Drawing on your intellect and imagination, our vibrant Film and Media Studies programme offers you the opportunity to gain an understanding of the developments in this major global industry and to critically examine central elements of Film Studies – production, reception, and textual functions – within the context of wider media history and culture.

Through a variety of modules, you will learn transferable skills, creative thinking, and have opportunities to apply theoretical knowledge to practical projects. You will explore the history and development of film as a medium, techniques of narrative and storytelling, genre and questions of taste, representation and identities, fans and audiences, and many other exciting areas.

You are taught by a team of film specialists with different backgrounds, whose diverse research expertise is reflected in the breadth and scope of the curriculum.

Year 1 introduces you to the academic study of the media, developing a broad understanding of key issues, concepts and debates in a variety of contexts. There is a particular focus on the impact of digital media and the convergence of old and new media. You will have the chance to apply this knowledge of theory and history in practical modules where you will develop digital technology skills. You will also take two dedicated Film Studies modules: Reading Film and Understanding Horror Film.

In Year 2, you will take more Film Studies modules (Contemporary European Cinema
and Science Fiction and Fantasy Film), as well as modules in media theory and research methodologies. The work placement module will help you start planning for your future career as a graduate.

Your final year will include both Media and Film modules and a year-long Extended Independent Project that will allow you to demonstrate the full range of your knowledge and skills in a deep and sustained fashion. You will also study modules in Gothic Film, Community Media, Celebrity Culture, and Stars.

A choice of optional modules in Years 2 and 3 include Exploring Teaching as a Career, Interrogating TV, Politics and the Media, and Documentary and Photojournalism.

You will benefit from collaborating with fellow students from different programmes of study within the School of Media and Film in a friendly interdisciplinary learning environment. This will provide you with a wide range of knowledge and experience, which will give you an edge in your chosen graduate career.

Careers

On successful completion of the course you will be ready to enter a wide range of careers across the media and cultural industries, such as journalism, media management, film, television and video production, film criticism, social media branding, public relations and advertising.

94% of our 2016/17 graduates (first degree and other undergraduate courses) were in employment and/or further study six months after completing their course (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey). 

Pre-approved for a Masters

If you study a Bachelor Honours degrees with us, you will be pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible, you will need to apply by the end of March in the final year of your degree and meet the entry requirements of your chosen Masters degree.

 

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Work placements

Students have the opportunity to take part in field trips and gain work experience through volunteering.

Study abroad (optional):

Our BA (Hons) Film and Media Studies course provides an opportunity for you to study abroad in the United States of America (USA) in Year 2 (Level 5).

For more information see our Study Abroad section.

Learning and teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market. 

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc.), you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 1 (Level 4): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 324 hours
  • Independent learning: 876 hours
Year 2 (Level 5): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 240 hours
  • Independent learning: 924 hours
  • Placement: 36 hours
Year 3 (Level 6): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 192 hours
  • Independent learning: 1008 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course. 

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester.

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 1 (Level 4)*:
  • 88% coursework
  • 11% written exams
  • 1% practical exams
Year 2 (Level 5)*:
  • 100% coursework
  • 0% written exams
  • 0% practical exams
Year 3 (Level 6)*:
  • 99% coursework
  • 0% written exams
  • 1% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2020 Entry: 96-112 points
2021 Entry: 96-112 points

A GCSE A*-C or 9-4 pass in English Language is required.

International Baccalaureate: 26 points to include a minimum of 2 Higher level IB certificates at grade 4 or above.

If English is not your first language: IELTS 6.0 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in writing or equivalent

Course enquiries and applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234

Send us a message

International students

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by emailing our International Recruitment Team at International@winchester.ac.uk or calling +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Days.

Year 1 (Level 4)

Modules Credits

Introduction to Media, Culture and Society 15

This module introduces the main concepts, themes and theories that are deployed to study media and communication in contemporary society. The module will provide students with opportunities to learn and apply a set of key concepts that are central to the analysis of media including journalism, advertising, audio media and social media. While it does not assume that you have studied media before, it will involve the application of these concepts to contemporary issues and developments in ways that will be new and stimulating for students who may have undertaken the study of the media in courses before coming to university. Key concepts include production, consumption, representation, identity, power and control, ‘new’ and ‘old’ media, signs, genre, audience and regulation. The focus will be upon the application of these key concepts in the analysis of contemporary media.

Manipulating Media 30

This module will focus on the collaborative production of rich online, media projects based on particular themes. Students will work in teams to research, produce and publish online media projects. The contents of the projects may consist of social networking sites, blogs, wiki documents, video, photographic and audio (podcasts), textual documents, and supporting academic materials, such as annotated bibliographies. Students will perform a variety of tasks on the module and gain a range of skills in the gathering, evaluation and production of information as well as research, project management and leadership skills.

Introduction to Digital Video Skills 15

This module introduces and develops various skills required for the production of digital video, such as how to handle a camera, how to assess and capture sound and light, and how to edit footage. Students will work in small groups to mutually support each other through the process of decision-making, producing, and reflecting upon their work. These skills and experiences are crucial building blocks for creating professional digital content in the age of social media.

Introduction to Digital Publishing Skills 15

In this module students will be introduced to the essentials of digital publishing. Gaining a solid understanding of the basics of using programs from the Adobe Creative Cloud suite (Photoshop, InDesign and Illustrator) students will develop skills in graphic design, publishing software, and knowledge of the industry.

Understanding Horror Film 15

This module will focus on the horror film to explore the flexibility of the genre and how it has adapted to industrial, social, political and cultural change. Charting the genre from the 1930s to contemporary horror cinema and across different national cinema traditions, the module will act as a case study of film history through a focused study of a specific area that will exemplify and develop the approach of the Film Form, History and Culture module, while also considering the importance of social and cultural context through exploration of the horrific ‘other’, the uncanny, ideology and genre, the body and body horror and representations of gender, sexuality and ethnicity.

Reading Film 15

Running parallel to the theoretical strand, Film Criticism, and focusing on contemporary mainstream films, this module will offer an introduction to the basic procedures for reading film, writing about film and the terminology most widely used in film analysis. Methods of close textual analysis will be explored, foregrounding major filmic devices, or procedures, such as mise-en-scène, editing, sound and narrative. The module will help students explore and evaluate ways in which these devices contribute to meaning.

Optional modules
  • The Meaning of Life on Film - 15 Credits

Optional Credits

Introduction to Media, Culture and Society 15

This module introduces the main concepts, themes and theories that are deployed to study media and communication in contemporary society. The module will provide students with opportunities to learn and apply a set of key concepts that are central to the analysis of media including journalism, advertising, audio media and social media. While it does not assume that you have studied media before, it will involve the application of these concepts to contemporary issues and developments in ways that will be new and stimulating for students who may have undertaken the study of the media in courses before coming to university. Key concepts include production, consumption, representation, identity, power and control, ‘new’ and ‘old’ media, signs, genre, audience and regulation. The focus will be upon the application of these key concepts in the analysis of contemporary media.

Manipulating Media 30

This module will focus on the collaborative production of rich online, media projects based on particular themes. Students will work in teams to research, produce and publish online media projects. The contents of the projects may consist of social networking sites, blogs, wiki documents, video, photographic and audio (podcasts), textual documents, and supporting academic materials, such as annotated bibliographies. Students will perform a variety of tasks on the module and gain a range of skills in the gathering, evaluation and production of information as well as research, project management and leadership skills.

Introduction to Digital Video Skills 15

This module introduces and develops various skills required for the production of digital video, such as how to handle a camera, how to assess and capture sound and light, and how to edit footage. Students will work in small groups to mutually support each other through the process of decision-making, producing, and reflecting upon their work. These skills and experiences are crucial building blocks for creating professional digital content in the age of social media.

Introduction to Digital Publishing Skills 15

In this module students will be introduced to the essentials of digital publishing. Gaining a solid understanding of the basics of using programs from the Adobe Creative Cloud suite (Photoshop, InDesign and Illustrator) students will develop skills in graphic design, publishing software, and knowledge of the industry.

Understanding Horror Film 15

This module will focus on the horror film to explore the flexibility of the genre and how it has adapted to industrial, social, political and cultural change. Charting the genre from the 1930s to contemporary horror cinema and across different national cinema traditions, the module will act as a case study of film history through a focused study of a specific area that will exemplify and develop the approach of the Film Form, History and Culture module, while also considering the importance of social and cultural context through exploration of the horrific ‘other’, the uncanny, ideology and genre, the body and body horror and representations of gender, sexuality and ethnicity.

Reading Film 15

Running parallel to the theoretical strand, Film Criticism, and focusing on contemporary mainstream films, this module will offer an introduction to the basic procedures for reading film, writing about film and the terminology most widely used in film analysis. Methods of close textual analysis will be explored, foregrounding major filmic devices, or procedures, such as mise-en-scène, editing, sound and narrative. The module will help students explore and evaluate ways in which these devices contribute to meaning.

Optional modules
  • The Meaning of Life on Film - 15 Credits

Year 2 (Level 5)

Modules Credits

Introduction to Media Research Methods 15

This module introduces the main research techniques that are employed in researching media texts, institutions and audiences, both in their contemporary and historical contexts. Students are introduced to research practices found in Cultural Studies, qualitative and quantitative research. On completing this module students will be able to choose which research methods are most appropriate in developing their own research questions and be fully prepared to begin work on research that may form the basis of their final year projects.

Exploring Media Theory 15

This module aims to provide students with a thorough understanding with a number of the main theoretical approaches used in media and communications analysis. Accordingly it will focuses upon a number of key perspectives used in the academic study of the media. It examines a number of central topics students will learn how various theories can be applied to interpret these topics.

The module begins by problematizing the popular understanding of media and introducing a range of key theoretical traditions such as mass society theory, contemporary Marxist and feminist theory (and their variants), and post-structuralism. Students are encouraged to recognise underlying conceptions within these theories about the idea of the citizen, the nature of society, power, class and gender.

Social Media, Advertising and Branding 15

This module examines the various ways in which social media is used in advertising and branding. Social media has been understood as a key channel in integrated marketing communications over the past few years and a presence on social media constitutes a significant aspect of most marketing campaigns and branding strategies. The module will consider the various strategies and techniques used in advertising and branding on social media; explore basic methods of analysis in monitoring social media, consider a number of case studies in which social media has been used and examine the effectiveness and limitations (including legal and ethical issues) of social media and engagement. Students will produce a detailed plan for the use of social media in a branding or advertising campaign including the production of exemplar material for use in a campaign.

Understanding Social Media 15

Social media and web 2.0 software applications such as social networking tools, wikis, blogs, video sharing sites and other collaborative software available over the internet have had a considerable impact upon how people and organisations interact. Social media is often understood as a media form that enables the user production and dissemination of content. This module introduces students to the academic study of social media from within a humanities and social scientific framework. Furthermore, it will expand student’s capabilities in using social media and encourage them to recognise how social media can be used in a variety of contexts.

Students will be introduced to key debates surrounding social media including the ‘long tail’, privacy, copyright, collective intelligence and the wisdom of crowds and the various business models that underpin social media.

Contemporary European Cinema 15

On this module, a variety of contemporary European national cinemas will be investigated. We will begin with an examination of key concepts such as ‘popular’ and ‘national cinema’, interrogating oppositions between classifications such as ‘art’ and ‘entertainment’ to identify cinematic trends and audience expectations. The role of cinema in constructing a sense of national identity will be considered, as we explore such issues as ‘belonging’ and ‘otherness’, memory and trauma, and the national and transnational. Films will be situated in contexts of production and reception, and close attention will be paid to their textual features. Topics to be examined will include the role of the auteur within national cinema, the function of popular genres, and the ambivalence of European cinema’s relationship with Hollywood. In addition to attempting to identify an understanding of European cinema, the concept will be problematised by exploring the distinctive features of national cinemas.

Researching Film Studies 15

The module centres upon the independent research of primary and secondary sources that is an essential part of the successful undergraduate study of film, and through this enables students to pursue their own areas of study. The module correspondingly provides preparation for the Extended Independent Study (Dissertation) that Single Honours students undertake as a compulsory component of their studies in Year 3. Students will engage with research techniques and further develop their critical and theoretical understanding while working on a research project on an area of film of their own choice. Each year the module will have, as a way of focusing discussion, a thematic nucleus, which might comprise the consideration of, for example, a particular national cinema, filmmaking within a particular decade, a particular genre or the work of a particular filmmaker.

Science Fiction and Fantasy Film 15

This module examines science-fiction and fantasy versions of speculative cinema (not including Gothic and horror) with regard to their histories, institutional patterns, generic codes, and ideological and cultural resonances. The module sets out key generic concerns initially, but will then range across a variety of sub-genres (e.g., dystopias, apocalyptic texts, time travel, space opera, Cold War SF, swords and sorcery, Epic fantasy), hybrid forms (SF Horror, tech noir), themes (gender, ideology of the genres, special effects, the ‘Other’, cyborgs and robots, environmental concerns, and fantasy and allegory), and different national traditions from the US, Europe and Asia to understand the changing popularity and cultural meanings of SF and fantasy in cinema. Examples of texts to be studied include: Metropolis, Aelita, Things to Come, Alien, The Day the Earth Stood Still, 2001: A Space Odyssey, the original Star Wars trilogy, Lucy, Mad Max, Ex Machina, and Lord of the Rings.

Optional modules
  • Exploring Teaching as Career - 15 Credits
  • Work Placement - 15 Credits

Optional Credits

Introduction to Media Research Methods 15

This module introduces the main research techniques that are employed in researching media texts, institutions and audiences, both in their contemporary and historical contexts. Students are introduced to research practices found in Cultural Studies, qualitative and quantitative research. On completing this module students will be able to choose which research methods are most appropriate in developing their own research questions and be fully prepared to begin work on research that may form the basis of their final year projects.

Exploring Media Theory 15

This module aims to provide students with a thorough understanding with a number of the main theoretical approaches used in media and communications analysis. Accordingly it will focuses upon a number of key perspectives used in the academic study of the media. It examines a number of central topics students will learn how various theories can be applied to interpret these topics.

The module begins by problematizing the popular understanding of media and introducing a range of key theoretical traditions such as mass society theory, contemporary Marxist and feminist theory (and their variants), and post-structuralism. Students are encouraged to recognise underlying conceptions within these theories about the idea of the citizen, the nature of society, power, class and gender.

Social Media, Advertising and Branding 15

This module examines the various ways in which social media is used in advertising and branding. Social media has been understood as a key channel in integrated marketing communications over the past few years and a presence on social media constitutes a significant aspect of most marketing campaigns and branding strategies. The module will consider the various strategies and techniques used in advertising and branding on social media; explore basic methods of analysis in monitoring social media, consider a number of case studies in which social media has been used and examine the effectiveness and limitations (including legal and ethical issues) of social media and engagement. Students will produce a detailed plan for the use of social media in a branding or advertising campaign including the production of exemplar material for use in a campaign.

Understanding Social Media 15

Social media and web 2.0 software applications such as social networking tools, wikis, blogs, video sharing sites and other collaborative software available over the internet have had a considerable impact upon how people and organisations interact. Social media is often understood as a media form that enables the user production and dissemination of content. This module introduces students to the academic study of social media from within a humanities and social scientific framework. Furthermore, it will expand student’s capabilities in using social media and encourage them to recognise how social media can be used in a variety of contexts.

Students will be introduced to key debates surrounding social media including the ‘long tail’, privacy, copyright, collective intelligence and the wisdom of crowds and the various business models that underpin social media.

Contemporary European Cinema 15

On this module, a variety of contemporary European national cinemas will be investigated. We will begin with an examination of key concepts such as ‘popular’ and ‘national cinema’, interrogating oppositions between classifications such as ‘art’ and ‘entertainment’ to identify cinematic trends and audience expectations. The role of cinema in constructing a sense of national identity will be considered, as we explore such issues as ‘belonging’ and ‘otherness’, memory and trauma, and the national and transnational. Films will be situated in contexts of production and reception, and close attention will be paid to their textual features. Topics to be examined will include the role of the auteur within national cinema, the function of popular genres, and the ambivalence of European cinema’s relationship with Hollywood. In addition to attempting to identify an understanding of European cinema, the concept will be problematised by exploring the distinctive features of national cinemas.

Researching Film Studies 15

The module centres upon the independent research of primary and secondary sources that is an essential part of the successful undergraduate study of film, and through this enables students to pursue their own areas of study. The module correspondingly provides preparation for the Extended Independent Study (Dissertation) that Single Honours students undertake as a compulsory component of their studies in Year 3. Students will engage with research techniques and further develop their critical and theoretical understanding while working on a research project on an area of film of their own choice. Each year the module will have, as a way of focusing discussion, a thematic nucleus, which might comprise the consideration of, for example, a particular national cinema, filmmaking within a particular decade, a particular genre or the work of a particular filmmaker.

Science Fiction and Fantasy Film 15

This module examines science-fiction and fantasy versions of speculative cinema (not including Gothic and horror) with regard to their histories, institutional patterns, generic codes, and ideological and cultural resonances. The module sets out key generic concerns initially, but will then range across a variety of sub-genres (e.g., dystopias, apocalyptic texts, time travel, space opera, Cold War SF, swords and sorcery, Epic fantasy), hybrid forms (SF Horror, tech noir), themes (gender, ideology of the genres, special effects, the ‘Other’, cyborgs and robots, environmental concerns, and fantasy and allegory), and different national traditions from the US, Europe and Asia to understand the changing popularity and cultural meanings of SF and fantasy in cinema. Examples of texts to be studied include: Metropolis, Aelita, Things to Come, Alien, The Day the Earth Stood Still, 2001: A Space Odyssey, the original Star Wars trilogy, Lucy, Mad Max, Ex Machina, and Lord of the Rings.

Optional modules
  • Exploring Teaching as Career - 15 Credits
  • Work Placement - 15 Credits

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

The Extended Independent Study in Media and Communication 30

The Extended Independent Study in Media and Communication will give students opportunities to employ the academic, critical and practical skills that they have acquired through the Media and Communication programme in order to pursue their own interests in developing either:

  • a traditional academic research project (10,000-word dissertation)
  • a practical media project (e.g. a portfolio of journalism, videos, advertising campaign, public awareness campaign, producing a video game) alongside a shorter critical reflection (c. 4000 words)
Climate Crisis and the Media 15

Climate breakdown is the defining issue of our era, threatening the future of humanity. This module critically examines the media’s role in framing the parameters of climate change debates, representing visions of the natural world, and contributing to climate crisis itself. Topics covered include mapping the history of environmental awareness, the impact of media technologies on the natural world, fictional and non-fictional stories about environmentalism, celebrity activism, and exploring a range of critical approaches to thinking about the climate crisis. Students will be assessed through engaging with media technologies and creating a plan to mitigate such use through strategies of carbon offset.

Gothic Film 15

The module explores Gothic film by reference to specific texts and their broader cultural and historical contexts. It examines Gothic traditions in a broad diversity of cultural forms, drawing on a range of theoretical modes of thought, such as postcolonial criticism, feminism and psychoanalysis, looking at close links with Gothic romance and Gothic horror. Since the Age of Enlightenment, Gothic thinking has shed light on the wild sensations that drive us and the pull between rational and irrational forces, asking us to reconsider the securities of home, our sense of self and our beliefs. A new Gothic sensibility suggests that the wolf is within us, and the demon at the window is a reflection of our own image. Framed by a broad discussion on art, folklore, history, language, literature, media, mythology, politics, psychoanalysis and religion, the module stimulates new ways of thinking through and beyond disciplinary boundaries, providing a valuable framework: 1) to pinpoint specifically filmic concerns with Gothic horror motifs and themes and 2) to locate a ‘cinematic Gothic’, a concept that both draws on and is distinct from other (literary and artistic) forms. Underlying these objectives is an interest in the cultural and political functions of Gothic filmmaking, and the levels of subversion or social conformity at the heart of the films.

Celebrity Culture 15

This module will assess and critique from an academic perspective contemporary celebrity culture, exploring the ways conceptions of fame have in recent years exceeded their traditional origins in Hollywood due to the expansion of the media industries and developments in technology. It will, therefore, engage with the growing historiography of celebrity by locating modern versions of fame and stardom in Classical Hollywood and chart developments through the twentieth century, before focusing particularly on the production and consumption of celebrity in the contemporary milieu of social media and convergence culture. The module will explore a range of methodologies, including textual analysis, semiotics, political economy, and post-structuralism. Key topics will include history and historiography, ethics, technology, propaganda and public relations, branding, fan cultures, and the various affective functions of celebrity in terms of class and identity issues, including nation, gender, sexualities, and ‘race’.

Stars 15

The module will raise questions about the notion of stardom, the evolution of the star system and the history of star studies within the realm of film studies. Broad areas will include the connotations of ‘star’ and distinctions between star and actor, in terms of quality and notoriety. A range of methods and approaches will be explored, such as textual analysis, semiology, intertextuality and ethnography. Key concepts will include debates surrounding authorship, genre and identity issues such as race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. The shifting signification of specific stars, over time, and across different cultures, will also be explored.

Optional Modules
  • Dark Side of the Net - 15 Credits
  • Working in Digital Journalism - 15 Credits
  • Big Data and Algorithmic Cultures - 15 Credits
  • Politics and the Media - 15 Credits
  • Documentary and Photojournalism - 15 Credits
  • Interrogating TV - 15 Credits
  • Community Media - 15 Credits
  • The Values of Nature - 15 Credits
  • Video Game Worlds - 15 Credits

Optional Credits

The Extended Independent Study in Media and Communication 30

The Extended Independent Study in Media and Communication will give students opportunities to employ the academic, critical and practical skills that they have acquired through the Media and Communication programme in order to pursue their own interests in developing either:

  • a traditional academic research project (10,000-word dissertation)
  • a practical media project (e.g. a portfolio of journalism, videos, advertising campaign, public awareness campaign, producing a video game) alongside a shorter critical reflection (c. 4000 words)
Climate Crisis and the Media 15

Climate breakdown is the defining issue of our era, threatening the future of humanity. This module critically examines the media’s role in framing the parameters of climate change debates, representing visions of the natural world, and contributing to climate crisis itself. Topics covered include mapping the history of environmental awareness, the impact of media technologies on the natural world, fictional and non-fictional stories about environmentalism, celebrity activism, and exploring a range of critical approaches to thinking about the climate crisis. Students will be assessed through engaging with media technologies and creating a plan to mitigate such use through strategies of carbon offset.

Gothic Film 15

The module explores Gothic film by reference to specific texts and their broader cultural and historical contexts. It examines Gothic traditions in a broad diversity of cultural forms, drawing on a range of theoretical modes of thought, such as postcolonial criticism, feminism and psychoanalysis, looking at close links with Gothic romance and Gothic horror. Since the Age of Enlightenment, Gothic thinking has shed light on the wild sensations that drive us and the pull between rational and irrational forces, asking us to reconsider the securities of home, our sense of self and our beliefs. A new Gothic sensibility suggests that the wolf is within us, and the demon at the window is a reflection of our own image. Framed by a broad discussion on art, folklore, history, language, literature, media, mythology, politics, psychoanalysis and religion, the module stimulates new ways of thinking through and beyond disciplinary boundaries, providing a valuable framework: 1) to pinpoint specifically filmic concerns with Gothic horror motifs and themes and 2) to locate a ‘cinematic Gothic’, a concept that both draws on and is distinct from other (literary and artistic) forms. Underlying these objectives is an interest in the cultural and political functions of Gothic filmmaking, and the levels of subversion or social conformity at the heart of the films.

Celebrity Culture 15

This module will assess and critique from an academic perspective contemporary celebrity culture, exploring the ways conceptions of fame have in recent years exceeded their traditional origins in Hollywood due to the expansion of the media industries and developments in technology. It will, therefore, engage with the growing historiography of celebrity by locating modern versions of fame and stardom in Classical Hollywood and chart developments through the twentieth century, before focusing particularly on the production and consumption of celebrity in the contemporary milieu of social media and convergence culture. The module will explore a range of methodologies, including textual analysis, semiotics, political economy, and post-structuralism. Key topics will include history and historiography, ethics, technology, propaganda and public relations, branding, fan cultures, and the various affective functions of celebrity in terms of class and identity issues, including nation, gender, sexualities, and ‘race’.

Stars 15

The module will raise questions about the notion of stardom, the evolution of the star system and the history of star studies within the realm of film studies. Broad areas will include the connotations of ‘star’ and distinctions between star and actor, in terms of quality and notoriety. A range of methods and approaches will be explored, such as textual analysis, semiology, intertextuality and ethnography. Key concepts will include debates surrounding authorship, genre and identity issues such as race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. The shifting signification of specific stars, over time, and across different cultures, will also be explored.

Optional Modules
  • Dark Side of the Net - 15 Credits
  • Working in Digital Journalism - 15 Credits
  • Big Data and Algorithmic Cultures - 15 Credits
  • Politics and the Media - 15 Credits
  • Documentary and Photojournalism - 15 Credits
  • Interrogating TV - 15 Credits
  • Community Media - 15 Credits
  • The Values of Nature - 15 Credits
  • Video Game Worlds - 15 Credits

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2020 Course Tuition Fees

 UK/EU

International

Year 1 £9,250 £13,500
Year 2 £9,250 £13,500
Year 3 £9,250 £13,500
Total £27,750 £40,500
Optional Sandwich Year £700 £700
Total with Sandwich Year £28,450 £41,200

If you are a UK or EU student starting your degree in September 2020, the first year will cost you £9,250*. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK and EU students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK/EU Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £112.50 and a 15 credit module is £1,687.

*The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year. 

ADDITIONAL COSTS

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Optional

  • Overseas trip: Students will have the option to attend an overseas Film Festival in each year of study. Indicative cost: £375.

Mandatory

  • Core texts: In their first year, students are asked to purchase copies of John Hill & Pamela Church Gibson (eds) The Oxford Guide to Film Studies, OUP 1998 and David Bordwell & Kristin Thompson, Film Art: an Introduction, McGraw-Hill, 1993, 97, 2004, 06, 10, 12, 16. Indicative cost: £70.00.
  • Printing and Binding: We are proud to offer free printing for all students to ensure that printing costs are not a potential financial barrier to student success. The University of Winchester and Winchester Student Union are champions of sustainability and therefore ask that all students consider the environment and print fairly. Students may be required to pay for the costs of dissertation binding. Indicative cost is £1.50-£3.

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards.

Key course details

UCAS code
P350
Duration
3 years full-time; 6 years part-time
Typical offer
96-112 points
Location
On campus, Winchester