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COURSE OVERVIEW

  • Develop your knowledge and analytical skills to understand politics at domestic, regional and international levels 
  • Join a department that has averaged over 95% overall satisfaction since 2013 in National Student Surveys of final-year undergraduate students
  • Benefit from small numbers in tutorials, which allow for rewarding discussions and debates and closer interaction with our expert staff
  • Pursue your own interests through a wide range of specialist optional modules, which cover topical issues such as The War on Terror, 21st Century Africa and The Ethics of the Post‐Crash Economy

How on earth do we make sense of Brexit, Trump and terrorism? Why do countries go to war? And how can I actively participate in policy making? 

Our compelling course and enthusiastic team of expert lecturers will help you answer these questions and get to grips with the complexity of domestic, regional and international political life. 

Over three years, you gain a thorough overview of the key forces and trends driving politics in a wide range of areas such as the environment, human and animal rights, conventional and non-conventional security threats, diplomacy, strategy, China’s rise, the future role of the EU and the US. 

In today’s world of uncertain alliances and emerging popular movements, there is a new demand for experts who are equipped with the skills and knowledge to analyse global politics. You learn the various theoretical tools that are available to undertake such analyses and apply them to current political affairs.

On our distinctive programme you are encouraged to become an independent, critical inquirer and aspirational learner. Each module is designed by members of staff to reflect current debates within their disciplines and is shaped by their areas of research expertise.

Year 1 gives you a solid grounding in global political studies, including an introduction to International Relations, British and American Politics, Human Rights in the Global Political Economy and Principles of Micro- and Macroeconomics. 

In Year 2, you study the institutions and concepts behind US and Russian foreign policies, Strategic and Security Studies, Southern Cultures, Political and Religious Themes in the Near and Middle East and International Law.

Your final year features compulsory modules in Diplomatic Studies, China: 21st Century Challenges, Politics of International Courts, Human Rights in World Politics, and Politics, Energy and the Environment. Having built up an understanding of the core research methods and taught modules, you undertake a dissertation on a topic of your choice; this is a significant piece of independent research supported by expert supervision.

Throughout Years 2 and 3 you can choose from a wide range of optional modules to explore your special interests. These may include The War on Terror, The Modern American Presidency, Sexual Violence and Politics, The Politics of Food Production, and The Ethics of the Post‐Crash Economy.

Careers

Our graduates bring a global perspective as well as transferable skills in time management, problem solving and critical thinking to the workplace. They are prepared to address many of the complex issues facing the modern world.

These skills open up a number of career paths to you, including roles in national and local government, the civil and foreign service, interest groups, non-government organisations and charities. You may also find rewarding roles in education, business, the military and media.

94% of our 2016/17 graduates (first degree and other undergraduate courses) were in employment and/or further study six months after completing their course.

The Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) record collects information about what those completing university go on to do six months after graduation. The Careers Service undertakes DLHE on an annual basis through surveys and a data collection process. DLHE is designed and strictly controlled by HESA.

Pre-approved for a Masters

University of Winchester students studying Bachelor Honours degrees are pre-approved to start a Masters degree at Winchester. To be eligible students must apply by the end of March in their final year and meet the entry requirements of their chosen Masters degree.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applications from:

UK, EU, World

Work placements

You have the opportunity to undertake professional practice placements during the programme for three months, six months or one year. Three or six month placements can be taken as part of credit bearing modules, allowing you to undertake a work placement and still graduate within three years.

Learning and teaching

Our aim is to shape 'confident learners' by enabling you to develop the skills needed to excel in your studies here and as well as onto further studies or the employment market.                      

You are taught primarily through a combination of lectures and seminars, allowing opportunities to discuss and develop your understanding of topics covered in lectures in smaller groups.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time such as lectures and seminars etc.), you are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, your personal tutor and the wide range of services available to you within the University.

Independent learning

Over the duration of your course, you will be expected to develop independent and critical learning, progressively building confidence and expertise through independent and collaborative research, problem-solving and analysis with the support of staff. You take responsibility for your own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

Overall workload

Your overall workload consists of class contact hours, independent learning and assessment activity.

While your actual contact hours may depend on the optional modules you select, the following information gives an indication of how much time you will need to allocate to different activities at each level of the course.

Year 1 (Level 4): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 204 hours
  • Independent learning: 996 hours
Year 2 (Level 5): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 192 hours
  • Independent learning: 996 hours
  • Placement: 12 hours
Year 3 (Level 6): Timetabled teaching and learning activity*
  • Teaching, learning and assessment: 168 hours
  • Independent learning: 1032 hours

*Please note these are indicative hours for the course. 

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on campus in Winchester.

Teaching hours

All class based teaching takes places between 9am – 6pm, Monday to Friday during term time. Wednesday afternoons are kept free from timetabled teaching for personal study time and for sports clubs and societies to train, meet and play matches. There may be some occasional learning opportunities (for example, an evening guest lecturer or performance) that take places outside of these hours for which you will be given forewarning.

The University library is open seven days a week, 24 hours a day.

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Percentage of the course assessed by coursework

The assessment balance between examination and coursework depends to some extent on the optional modules you choose. The approximate percentage of the course assessed by different assessment modes is as follows:

Year 1 (Level 4)*:
  • 69% coursework
  • 31% written exams
  • 0% practical exams
Year 2 (Level 5)*:
  • 80% coursework
  • 8% written exams
  • 12% practical exams
Year 3 (Level 6)*:
  • 77% coursework
  • 13% written exams
  • 10% practical exams

*Please note these are indicative percentages and modes for the programme.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

2020 Entry: 104-120 points

A GCSE A*-C or 9-4 pass in English Language is required.

International Baccalaureate:104-120 points to include a minimum of 2 Higher level IB certificates at grade 4 or above.

If English is not your first language: IELTS 6.0 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in writing or equivalent.

Course Enquiries and Applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234

Send us a message

International Students

International students seeking additional information about this programme can send an email to International@winchester.ac.uk or call +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Days

Year 1 (Level 4)

Modules Credits

Introduction to Global Politics and Philosophy 30

This module introduces significant themes, theoretical perspectives and concepts in Politics and Global Studies, and aims to develop an initial understanding of the methodologies and practices of the discipline of Politics where it comes into contact with related subject areas such as international relations, economics, the environment and religion. This module aims to develop an understanding of Global Politics. By covering the theory and practice of politics in terms of examining different political systems such as representative, parliamentary democracy and their institutions of government, the role of interest groups, electoral systems, voting behaviour, public policy, human rights, security studies, international economic relations, dictatorships and one party states will give a grounding in how political processes work. The course then goes on to examine the philosophical underpinnings of differing systems of government by looking at ideologies such as liberalism, conservatism, communism and socialism that originated in the Western world and comparing and contrasting systems of government elsewhere in the world where such beliefs have been used, adapted or rejected.

Introduction to International Relations 15

This module outlines the key theoretical perspectives within International Relations. It will provide students with an overview of the development of the discipline of International Relations considering key historical eras. The module assists students in developing a theoretical vocabulary by introducing them to the major approaches and their critiques within the discipline. It will also draw upon empirical examples of historical and contemporary significance and equip students to describe, analysis and understand them. For example, war, peace, globalisation and terrorism. Students will be encouraged to critically engage with these issues in order to comprehend the way in which different theoretical approaches shape meaning and understanding of them.

United States Politics and Society 15

This module examines the ideas and themes in American politics, with particular emphasis on the contemporary situation. It will incorporate key theories of political science and political philosophy, looking at such themes as separation of powers and ideas including American liberalism and American conservatism. It will also look at the contemporary policy debates in America at present, such as healthcare and the size of the government. The module should provide sufficient foundational knowledge of the American political system, not least in the context of the controversies raised during and after the 2016 Presidential election, which will aid future study, especially in other modules like Modern American Presidency and US Foreign Policy.

Human Rights in the Global Political Economy 15

Human rights have been called the ‘idea of our time.’ In the post-World War Two period this ‘idea’ has achieved a totemic status, associated with civility and modernity. Against this, however, are the widespread reports of torture, genocide, disappearances, ethnic cleansing, political prisoners, the suppression of trade unions and democracy movements, and willful deprivation of access to the basic necessities of life.

One of the causes for the apparent disjuncture between the optimism represented by the idea of human rights, and the pessimism engendered by media reports of widespread violation of human rights, can be found in what John Vincent has called ‘human rights talk’. Human rights is not a singular discourse, but three overlapping discourses: philosophy, law and politics. We will critically explore these three discourses historically, culturally and in their contemporary form, and seek to gain an insight into the role of human rights under conditions of present-day globalization.

Introduction to British Politics 15

This module aims to introduce students to contemporary debates within British politics. Whilst focusing on contemporary issues, this module will also help students to understand the context and history of British political development.  By focusing on British politics, students will be able to understand how British parliamentary democracy works. This will involve looking at political parties, the Great Offices of state, the role of the media and Britain's foreign relations and how the post-Brexit environment will impact on British politics.

Principles of Micro‐ and Macro Economics 30

This module introduces students to the field of economics. The first semester focuses on Microeconomics, studying the behaviour of individual agents and their interaction in markets. The second semester focuses on Macroeconomics, the study of the economy at the aggregate level, and the fundamental policy choices that are associated with it.

Students will learn a range of vocabulary and concepts that allow them to model and understand economic situations, to predict the consequences of changing a particular variable, and to determine the best economic course of action for agents. During the semester, students will undertake a range of exercises to be held during seminars. These will contribute to develop those skills that will be tested in two assignments, due at the end of each semester, and the final exam, taking place during assessment week.

Year 2 (Level 5)

Modules Credits

US Foreign Policy: Institutions and Concepts 15

The foreign policy of the United States has had far reaching impact and global ramifications. The contemporary position of the US as the “world’s only superpower”, and her dominance in terms of world trade, military capacity, and cultural output, means that the foreign policy decisions of the US government are hugely consequential and worthy of study. This module will seek to explain how and why these decisions are made by introducing the key foreign policy concepts and ideological positions present in the US polity, as well as charting the institutions and offices under whose authority it falls to make them. Expanding on this, an analysis will be made of extra-governmental institutions, such as the media and its impact on policy. Students will gain from the module an understanding of the processes involved in formulating America’s foreign policy, the extent of its impact in the arena of international relations, and the objectives and motivations that drive it.

Researching Politics and Global Studies 15

This module will meet in small tutor groups of four or five. In this format, students will work with tutors to sharpen their skills in researching, collating, organising, assessing and presenting materials drawn from different sources (e.g. print [monograph and article], journalistic, on-line.) This will be achieved via a variety of individual student-led projects which will deepen an understanding of the demands of an interdisciplinary approach to Politics and Global Studies, providing good preparation for the FYP. 

Optional Modules
  • Political and Religious Themes in the Near and Middle East - 15 credits
  • Global Governance - 15 credits
  • Gender, Power and Global Politics - 15 credits
  • The ‘War on Terror’ and the ‘Axis of Evil’ and Beyond - 15 credits
  • International Law - 15 credits
  • Discourses Of War - 15 credits
  • Independent Study Module - 15 credits
  • Security Studies : Theory and Practice - 15 credits
  • Political Leadership and Communication - 15 credits
  • The Modern American Presidency - 15 credits
  • Southern Cultures - 15 credits
  • Global Political Economy - 15 credits
  • The Changing Face of Politics: Party, Activism and Community - 15 credits
  • Volunteering For Politics and Global Studies - 15 credits
  • Power: Theory and Applications - 15 credits

Optional Credits

US Foreign Policy: Institutions and Concepts 15

The foreign policy of the United States has had far reaching impact and global ramifications. The contemporary position of the US as the “world’s only superpower”, and her dominance in terms of world trade, military capacity, and cultural output, means that the foreign policy decisions of the US government are hugely consequential and worthy of study. This module will seek to explain how and why these decisions are made by introducing the key foreign policy concepts and ideological positions present in the US polity, as well as charting the institutions and offices under whose authority it falls to make them. Expanding on this, an analysis will be made of extra-governmental institutions, such as the media and its impact on policy. Students will gain from the module an understanding of the processes involved in formulating America’s foreign policy, the extent of its impact in the arena of international relations, and the objectives and motivations that drive it.

Researching Politics and Global Studies 15

This module will meet in small tutor groups of four or five. In this format, students will work with tutors to sharpen their skills in researching, collating, organising, assessing and presenting materials drawn from different sources (e.g. print [monograph and article], journalistic, on-line.) This will be achieved via a variety of individual student-led projects which will deepen an understanding of the demands of an interdisciplinary approach to Politics and Global Studies, providing good preparation for the FYP. 

Optional Modules
  • Political and Religious Themes in the Near and Middle East - 15 credits
  • Global Governance - 15 credits
  • Gender, Power and Global Politics - 15 credits
  • The ‘War on Terror’ and the ‘Axis of Evil’ and Beyond - 15 credits
  • International Law - 15 credits
  • Discourses Of War - 15 credits
  • Independent Study Module - 15 credits
  • Security Studies : Theory and Practice - 15 credits
  • Political Leadership and Communication - 15 credits
  • The Modern American Presidency - 15 credits
  • Southern Cultures - 15 credits
  • Global Political Economy - 15 credits
  • The Changing Face of Politics: Party, Activism and Community - 15 credits
  • Volunteering For Politics and Global Studies - 15 credits
  • Power: Theory and Applications - 15 credits

Year 3 (Level 6)

Modules Credits

Dissertation 30

This is a dissertation of between 8,000 and 10,000 words on a subject of the students’ choice (subject to approval). Study is primarily student-directed, with regular supervision supplied by tutors teaching in the subject. It is mandatory for Single Honours students; Joint students can choose which field to take their dissertation within.

Foreign Policy Analysis 15

This module examines the nature of foreign policy decisions, including the process of decision-making and the actual foreign policies pursued by state actors. This module begins by considering the nature of Foreign Policy Analysis (FPA) before introducing levels of analysis and their relationship to international relations theory as key tools for understanding and explaining how and why foreign policy decisions are made. This module explores a range contemporary and classic case-study examples to illustrate the role of individual leaders in foreign policy decision-making, the interplay of domestic and international politics in FPA, regional and international or systemic influences on foreign policy and key debates in the field, such as the rise of ‘civilian powers’, including supra-national foreign policy actors, such as the EU, and the problem of explaining continuity and change in FPA.

Optional Modules
  • Debates in Globalisation - 15 credits
  • Political Islam - 15 credits
  • Diplomatic Studies - 15 credits
  • Contemporary Civil War - 15 credits
  • Politics, Energy and the Environment - 15 credits
  • China: 21st Century Challenges - 15 credits
  • Case Study in Political Philosophy: Conservatism - 15 credits
  • Sexual Violence and Politics: a political, historical, and cultural investigation - 15 credits
  • Global South: Politics, Inequality and (In)Security - 15 credits
  • The Politics of Food Production, Consumption and Distribution - 15 credits
  • Liberty and Extremism - 15 credits
  • Populism and National Identity - 15 credits
  • The Ethics of the Post-Crash Economy - 15 credits
  • Writing Global History and Politics - 15 credits
  • Russian Foreign and Security Policy - 15 credits

Optional Credits

Dissertation 30

This is a dissertation of between 8,000 and 10,000 words on a subject of the students’ choice (subject to approval). Study is primarily student-directed, with regular supervision supplied by tutors teaching in the subject. It is mandatory for Single Honours students; Joint students can choose which field to take their dissertation within.

Foreign Policy Analysis 15

This module examines the nature of foreign policy decisions, including the process of decision-making and the actual foreign policies pursued by state actors. This module begins by considering the nature of Foreign Policy Analysis (FPA) before introducing levels of analysis and their relationship to international relations theory as key tools for understanding and explaining how and why foreign policy decisions are made. This module explores a range contemporary and classic case-study examples to illustrate the role of individual leaders in foreign policy decision-making, the interplay of domestic and international politics in FPA, regional and international or systemic influences on foreign policy and key debates in the field, such as the rise of ‘civilian powers’, including supra-national foreign policy actors, such as the EU, and the problem of explaining continuity and change in FPA.

Optional Modules
  • Debates in Globalisation - 15 credits
  • Political Islam - 15 credits
  • Diplomatic Studies - 15 credits
  • Contemporary Civil War - 15 credits
  • Politics, Energy and the Environment - 15 credits
  • China: 21st Century Challenges - 15 credits
  • Case Study in Political Philosophy: Conservatism - 15 credits
  • Sexual Violence and Politics: a political, historical, and cultural investigation - 15 credits
  • Global South: Politics, Inequality and (In)Security - 15 credits
  • The Politics of Food Production, Consumption and Distribution - 15 credits
  • Liberty and Extremism - 15 credits
  • Populism and National Identity - 15 credits
  • The Ethics of the Post-Crash Economy - 15 credits
  • Writing Global History and Politics - 15 credits
  • Russian Foreign and Security Policy - 15 credits

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2020 Course Tuition Fees

 UK/EU

International

Year 1 £9,250 £13,500
Year 2 £9,250 £13,500
Year 3 £9,250 £13,500
Total £27,750 £40,500
Optional Sandwich Year £700 £700
Total with Sandwich Year £28,450 £41,200

If you are a UK or EU student starting your degree in September 2020, the first year will cost you £9,250*. Based on this fee level, the indicative fees for a three-year degree would be £27,750 for UK and EU students.

Remember, you don't have to pay any of this upfront if you are able to get a tuition fee loan from the UK Government to cover the full cost of your fees each year. If finance is a worry for you, we are here to help. Take a look at the range of support we have on offer. This is a great investment you are making in your future, so make sure you know what is on offer to support you.

UK/EU Part-Time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £77.08 and a 15 credit module is £1,156. Part-time students can take up to a maximum 90 credits per year, so the maximum fee in a given year will be the government permitted maximum fee of £6,935.

International part-time fees are calculated on a pro rata basis of the full-time fee for a 120 credit course. The fee for a single credit is £112.50 and a 15 credit module is £1,687.

*The University of Winchester will charge the maximum approved tuition fee per year. 

Additional Costs

As one of our students all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees, including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Mandatory Costs

Printing and Binding: We are proud to offer free printing for all students to ensure that printing costs are not a potential financial barrier to student success. The University of Winchester and Winchester Student Union are champions of sustainability and therefore ask that all students consider the environment and print fairly. Students may be required to pay for the costs of dissertation binding. Indicative cost is £1.50-£3.

Course specific bursaries/scholarships

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards page.

Key course details

UCAS code
L240
Duration
3 years full-time; 6 years part-time
Typical offer
104-120 points
Location
On campus, Winchester