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COURSE OVERVIEW

Please note this programme is closed for September 2020 entry. Applications will be accepted from October 2020, for September 2021 entry. 

  • Learn from a specialist team of research-active academics who work at the forefront of the field
  • Access a wide range of specialist software and tools including a dedicated Cyber Security and Forensics laboratory in a state-of-the-art new development (from 2019)
  • Develop an appreciation of the wider role information security plays in an organisational context

The course covers key aspects of Cyber Security including network, computer and information security. You will learn the most important information security concepts — such as access control, risk management, security governance, data protection and network security. Alongside this, the course focuses on the business context so that students can progress their careers more rapidly through organisations and aim very particularly at management positions.

This programme will provide you with the necessary skills to understand and apply security knowledge to recognise and resolve complex threats faced by organisations and government bodies. You will develop a rounded perspective of key security domains such as network security, information security management and risk. In addition, you will develop a deep understanding of business management enabling you to respond positively to global challenges in the twenty-first century.

Careers

Students will be equipped to enter a variety of business and information security management roles including business development manager and information security manager.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Suitable for applicants from:

UK, EU, World

Learning and teaching

The programme is designed to ensure that learning, teaching and assessment is embedded within the programme to meet learning outcomes and provide ‘accessible and appropriate support for all aspects of student academic and personal skills development’ (Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy, 2015-18). The programme has a modular structure and learning outcomes and assessments are clearly defined for each module.

Location

Taught elements of the course take place on the King Alfred Campus or at West Downs, Winchester

Assessment

Our validated courses may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances.

We ensure all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used on the course you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day or Open Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Feedback

We are committed to providing timely and appropriate feedback to you on your academic progress and achievement in order to enable you to reflect on your progress and plan your academic and skills development effectively. You are also encouraged to seek additional feedback from your course tutors.

Further information

For more information about our regulations for this course, please see our Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

A good first degree in computing or a computing-related discipline. A lower degree classification may be considered if you can demonstrate a significant level of experience in the security area, with competence in computer programming. Professional experience may also be taken into consideration.

If English is not your first language: IELTS 6.0 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in writing or equivalent

Course enquiries and applications

Telephone: +44 (0) 1962 827234
Send us a message

International students

If you are living outside of the UK or Europe, you can find out more about how to join this course by emailing our International Recruitment Team at International@winchester.ac.uk or calling +44 (0)1962 827023

Visit us

Explore our campus and find out more about studying at Winchester by coming to one of our Open Evenings.

 

Year 1 (Level 7)

Modules Credits

Academic Development and Research 20

The aim of this module is to develop student understanding of the skills and competencies required in academic study and research at postgraduate level.  The module is designed to provide students with the knowledge and tools required to develop and undertake research in the area of international business. Students will evaluate and synthesise research philosophies, develop research strategies, and select research methods using secondary and/or primary sources appropriate to particular research questions, relating these to existing international business theories.The module provides the foundation for further development of research skills through a dissertation by independent study.

Information Security Management 20

This module focuses on the operation and improvement of information security and encompasses three roles commonly defined in the security community: Security and Information Risk Advisor, Security Architect and Security Officer.  In addition, the following six domains are covered: Access Control, Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery, Information Security Governance and Risk Management; Software Development Security, Security Architecture and Design, Physical and Environmental Security.

Principles of Responsible Management 20

This module introduces the principles of responsible management as presented in the United Nations PRME and Global Compact frameworks. The module draws on and engages with the ongoing debate concerning the role of business organisations as future generators of ‘sustainable value’ for business and society at large. Issues such as ethics, corporate social responsibility, sustainability, globalisation, and stakeholder theory are considered. These are then placed in the context of functional discipline areas through topics such as accounting standards, corporate governance, green marketing, social entrepreneurship, employee wellbeing, sustainable innovation and global supply-chain management. The module will introduce a critical understanding of CSR investment decision-making and its limits in company practice. The implications of principles of sustainability and responsibility for student’s own leadership practices are considered, introducing the concept of ‘responsible leadership’ from different organisational, national, cultural and ethical perspectives. Employer engagement through seminars with invited industry practitioners will add a practical slant to the student experience.

Managing in a Global Environment 20
Cyber Crime and the Dark Web 20

This module critically evaluates state-of-the-art research in the areas of Cyber Crime and Cyber Security.  The history of Cyber Crime is explored together with the key stakeholders in the business of preventing, controlling and policing cyber-criminal activities. Consideration is given to crypto currencies and the political economy of the Dark Web.

Strategic Management 20

Strategic management is the primary decision-making function of senior managers in public, private and third-stream organisations, regardless of scale, ownership or location. This module considers the process of strategic management from theoretical, analytical and practical perspectives and the points of view of a range of stakeholders. It aims to equip students with the ideas and conceptual tools they will need to understand organisational strategic practice in diverse conditions. They will learn to evaluate an organisation’s internal competences, its access to financial resources, as well as its capabilities to compete within and across markets, and to respond to rapid fluctuations in financial and strategic environments.

Through discussion of differing theoretical perspectives and their application to a global range of case studies, students consider the issues that arise as organisations pursue opportunities for sustainability and growth while subject to contextual parameters, competitive pressures and financial constraints in the post-financial crash world. They will engage in research individually and in groups to evaluate organisational performance using financial and non-financial models, but will also learn how to develop practical solutions and future-oriented strategic options within embedded paradigms of sustainability and ethical management practice. Students will acquire ideas and a toolkit readily applicable to the organisations and environments they find themselves in after graduation.

Entrepreneurship 20

Entrepreneurship is recognised as a phenomenon fundamental to global economic growth and development, thanks both to the importance of small firms as the mainstay of most economies and the vital role played by dynamic and innovative new ventures. This module views entrepreneurship through a comparative global perspective, within a sustainable and ethical framework. It sets out to develop students’ understanding of theoretical debates in entrepreneurial scholarship and their ability to assess them, with a grounding in opportunity-focused behavioural perspectives and their critical alternatives.

Yet entrepreneurship is an inherently practical activity, and the module discusses a set of tools and models used to examine entrepreneurial practice in local, regional and global contexts. Students learn how to evaluate new entrepreneurial opportunities and the venture-building and sustainability strategies of the entrepreneurs who grasp those opportunities. In a highly practical manner, they also develop skills in researching and developing innovative new business models and communicating the results to both scholarly and practitioner audiences.

Dissertation (Independent Study Module) 40
Optional Modules
  • Intercultural Business Communications 20 credits
  • Managing Information for Decision Making 20 credits

Optional Credits

Academic Development and Research 20

The aim of this module is to develop student understanding of the skills and competencies required in academic study and research at postgraduate level.  The module is designed to provide students with the knowledge and tools required to develop and undertake research in the area of international business. Students will evaluate and synthesise research philosophies, develop research strategies, and select research methods using secondary and/or primary sources appropriate to particular research questions, relating these to existing international business theories.The module provides the foundation for further development of research skills through a dissertation by independent study.

Information Security Management 20

This module focuses on the operation and improvement of information security and encompasses three roles commonly defined in the security community: Security and Information Risk Advisor, Security Architect and Security Officer.  In addition, the following six domains are covered: Access Control, Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery, Information Security Governance and Risk Management; Software Development Security, Security Architecture and Design, Physical and Environmental Security.

Principles of Responsible Management 20

This module introduces the principles of responsible management as presented in the United Nations PRME and Global Compact frameworks. The module draws on and engages with the ongoing debate concerning the role of business organisations as future generators of ‘sustainable value’ for business and society at large. Issues such as ethics, corporate social responsibility, sustainability, globalisation, and stakeholder theory are considered. These are then placed in the context of functional discipline areas through topics such as accounting standards, corporate governance, green marketing, social entrepreneurship, employee wellbeing, sustainable innovation and global supply-chain management. The module will introduce a critical understanding of CSR investment decision-making and its limits in company practice. The implications of principles of sustainability and responsibility for student’s own leadership practices are considered, introducing the concept of ‘responsible leadership’ from different organisational, national, cultural and ethical perspectives. Employer engagement through seminars with invited industry practitioners will add a practical slant to the student experience.

Managing in a Global Environment 20
Cyber Crime and the Dark Web 20

This module critically evaluates state-of-the-art research in the areas of Cyber Crime and Cyber Security.  The history of Cyber Crime is explored together with the key stakeholders in the business of preventing, controlling and policing cyber-criminal activities. Consideration is given to crypto currencies and the political economy of the Dark Web.

Strategic Management 20

Strategic management is the primary decision-making function of senior managers in public, private and third-stream organisations, regardless of scale, ownership or location. This module considers the process of strategic management from theoretical, analytical and practical perspectives and the points of view of a range of stakeholders. It aims to equip students with the ideas and conceptual tools they will need to understand organisational strategic practice in diverse conditions. They will learn to evaluate an organisation’s internal competences, its access to financial resources, as well as its capabilities to compete within and across markets, and to respond to rapid fluctuations in financial and strategic environments.

Through discussion of differing theoretical perspectives and their application to a global range of case studies, students consider the issues that arise as organisations pursue opportunities for sustainability and growth while subject to contextual parameters, competitive pressures and financial constraints in the post-financial crash world. They will engage in research individually and in groups to evaluate organisational performance using financial and non-financial models, but will also learn how to develop practical solutions and future-oriented strategic options within embedded paradigms of sustainability and ethical management practice. Students will acquire ideas and a toolkit readily applicable to the organisations and environments they find themselves in after graduation.

Entrepreneurship 20

Entrepreneurship is recognised as a phenomenon fundamental to global economic growth and development, thanks both to the importance of small firms as the mainstay of most economies and the vital role played by dynamic and innovative new ventures. This module views entrepreneurship through a comparative global perspective, within a sustainable and ethical framework. It sets out to develop students’ understanding of theoretical debates in entrepreneurial scholarship and their ability to assess them, with a grounding in opportunity-focused behavioural perspectives and their critical alternatives.

Yet entrepreneurship is an inherently practical activity, and the module discusses a set of tools and models used to examine entrepreneurial practice in local, regional and global contexts. Students learn how to evaluate new entrepreneurial opportunities and the venture-building and sustainability strategies of the entrepreneurs who grasp those opportunities. In a highly practical manner, they also develop skills in researching and developing innovative new business models and communicating the results to both scholarly and practitioner audiences.

Dissertation (Independent Study Module) 40
Optional Modules
  • Intercultural Business Communications 20 credits
  • Managing Information for Decision Making 20 credits

Please note the modules listed are correct at the time of publishing, for full-time students entering the programme in Year 1. Optional modules are listed where applicable. Please note the University cannot guarantee the availability of all modules listed and modules may be subject to change. For further information please refer to the terms and conditions at www.winchester.ac.uk/termsandconditions.
The University will notify applicants of any changes made to the core modules listed above.

Progression from one level of the programme to the next is subject to meeting the University’s academic regulations.

2020 Course Tuition Fees

UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man

Full-time entry | £8,200
Part-time entry | £4,100 p/a

Total Cost | £8,200

International Students

Full-time entry | £13,500
Part-time entry | £6,750 p/a

Total Cost | £13,500

 

ADDITIONAL COSTS

As one of our students, all of your teaching and assessments are included in your tuition fees including, lectures/guest lectures and tutorials, seminars, laboratory sessions and specialist teaching facilities. You will also have access to a wide range of student support and IT services.

There might be additional costs you may encounter whilst studying. The following highlights the mandatory and optional costs for this course:

Mandatory

Text-books

Students are required to purchase the core text-books (each semester of the programme)

SCHOLARSHIPS, BURSARIES AND AWARDS

We have a variety of scholarship and bursaries available to support you financially with the cost of your course. To see if you’re eligible, please see our Scholarships and Awards.

Key course details

Duration
Full-time: 1 year; Part-time: 2 years
Typical offer
A good first degree in computing or a computing-related discipline
Location
King Alfred Campus